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View Full Version : How does the Redray codec work?



Wayne Morellini
11-04-2013, 05:16 PM
How does the Redray compression codec work? It has been a while, there should be patents out there describing it.

Jeff Kilgroe
11-05-2013, 08:18 AM
Perhaps there are patents, but they may be held under an entity or name other than RED. Sometimes it's better to hold patents in obscurity than to broadcast your details to competitors. Especially in terms of software algorithms or other concepts where patents must be all too specific and can be easily circumvented by re-ordering a step or two. And it's always better to hold the patent on the concept than on the technical method.

What they have said publicly is that it's wavelet based, as are the recorded R3D files. It is an encrypted format, which is an inherent aspect of wavelets when properly implemented.

Wayne Morellini
11-05-2013, 10:07 AM
Thanks Jeff, I had considered patenting under another entity a long tine ago, and forgotten, until after I posted this. However, redray could have been done under old patent law, which required actual inventors to be listed. Even if they reassigned their rights to have their name expunged (us that possible) there should be a record of the change somewhere. With companies, even if you made an entity the ownership papers of the entity would point back to the owners and eventually them, though it is possible to hide ownership in certain companies I think. The other way, is to have some party agree to hold the ownership of the patent for you under contract, ussually law firms most likely.

Still, who makes Red's sensor tech, Jim said he was going to mention it. Originally when Jim showed a picture of what the technology does in the mid 2000`s it turned out to be shot on a Canon, it seemed he was saying the picture was shit with the same technology. In America, there is Aptina. They came out with this supper looking saturated mode, if you took away the color, increased the detail, contrast and sharpness, maybe it would look like old Red footage. Anybody got a Nikon J1/V1 to compare stills? :)

egon touste
11-16-2013, 11:55 AM
It is an encrypted format, which is an inherent aspect of wavelets when properly implemented.
not true jeff ..redode may be encrypted.. but wavelet transformations have no inherent encryption ..and have nothing to do with the compression actually, except that they present the data to the compression algorithm in a more compressible way..they always have an inverse wavelet transformation..so that we see a picture after encode.. just saying

Axel Mertes
12-18-2013, 05:42 AM
What they have said publicly is that it's wavelet based, as are the recorded R3D files. It is an encrypted format, which is an inherent aspect of wavelets when properly implemented.

Jeff,

wavelets and encrpytion have absoluetly nothing to do with each other.

Wavelet data may look cryptic to you, but believe me - it really isn't.

However, it may well be the case that .RED files are using encryption for the sake of DRM. But that would happen definetly after the wavelet conversion, quantisation and compression.

Cheers,
Axel