PDA

View Full Version : Stop motion... help!



HeatherMarieCollins
07-14-2008, 05:10 PM
I shot a stop motion test last week through the following process:
In the sensor menu, I accessed the Time Lapse sub menu and enabled it. I then set it to "one shot", "trigger mode". After exiting the menu, my screen showed that I was in "1 frame burst". I then proceeded to capture 200 stills by pressing the record button once to arm, once to post. I could see at the top of my screen that the clips were being named sequentially and I stopped at 200. I was shooting at 4K RAW, Redcode 28.

I gave the card to a DIT and they say that they are unable to bring the footage into Final Cut. In fact, they say that there is only 35K of information in the file (meaning nothing at all). So, my question is, am I capturing correctly? I'm going wrong somewhere.... I'd appreciate any advice you can give me. Thank you!

Kenn Michael
07-14-2008, 05:24 PM
Each frame is not its own separate clip. They will be strung together as one long R3D.

Use the side Record button to capture frames, then use the back Record button to stop recording. To make sure that you are recording properly, you should see your red timecode display advance each time you press the side record button.

conrad gaunt
07-14-2008, 05:33 PM
I shot a stop motion test last week through the following process:
In the sensor menu, I accessed the Time Lapse sub menu and enabled it. I then set it to "one shot", "trigger mode". After exiting the menu, my screen showed that I was in "1 frame burst". I then proceeded to capture 200 stills by pressing the record button once to arm, once to post. I could see at the top of my screen that the clips were being named sequentially and I stopped at 200. I was shooting at 4K RAW, Redcode 28.

I gave the card to a DIT and they say that they are unable to bring the footage into Final Cut. In fact, they say that there is only 35K of information in the file (meaning nothing at all). So, my question is, am I capturing correctly? I'm going wrong somewhere.... I'd appreciate any advice you can give me. Thank you!

You need to try and narrow down what the problem is, obviously(!), so
What build are you using?
.. Is the DIT selecting the correct file?
Is he copying all the data across from the CF card, including any folders?

Try doing a search of the CF Card for "all files, including subfolders etc" and see if there are any files larger than 35k.

35k only seems large enough to hold some sort of meta-data, not any footage. If thats the largest file, then the camera surely isn`t recording anything? Have you printed out the manual? I haven`t had much time yet to test my R1`s functionality, or read the manual yet, but that will start tomorrow hopefully, then I`ll be more use :)

Ed Watkins
07-14-2008, 05:34 PM
What file were they trying to take into final cut? The .R3D file or a QT proxy file?
Is the 35k file the .R3D file? If it is, then that would suggest that you didn't capture correctly.

From what you are saying, it sounds like you created 200 .r3d files rather than one .r3d file with 200 frames. You can use an external trigger like the the Origo (http://www.viewfactor.net/khxc/index.php?app=ccp0&ns=prodall) to do capture this way, or use the side record button, as stated above.

Kenn Michael
07-14-2008, 05:35 PM
The side record button triggers frames, the back button starts and ends the record process.

Noah Kadner
07-14-2008, 05:37 PM
IMHO a DSLR is way more useful for stop motion- not too mention cheaper and less bulky.

Noah

Ed Watkins
07-14-2008, 05:40 PM
IMHO a DSLR is way more useful for stop motion- not too mention cheaper and less bulky.

Noah

Totally agree. I use a DSLR hooked up to a capture program for onion skinning. Not to mention the advantages of the ability to pan and scan on the over sized image in post.

HeatherMarieCollins
07-14-2008, 06:00 PM
To answer some of the questions, I was using Build 15. I have read the manual but was not aware that the side and back record buttons are different. I will sure give that a try.
I will contact the DIT and ask what his process was. Thank you all for your help.

HeatherMarieCollins
07-14-2008, 06:02 PM
Just to clarify, I should press the back button once at the beginning then use the side button to trigger capturing each frame. Then, at the end of the process, press the back button again?

Noah Kadner
07-14-2008, 06:06 PM
Totally agree. I use a DSLR hooked up to a capture program for onion skinning. Not to mention the advantages of the ability to pan and scan on the over sized image in post.

Plus battery life... :)

-Noah

Eli
07-14-2008, 07:41 PM
I am the Post Super, and working as the DIT in this case, on the project you are referring to. What was delivered to me was 200 .R3D files all 32k in size. Obviously not enough to record anything. If you can check your recording settings I bet that will solve it.

:)

Jason Diamond
07-15-2008, 04:10 AM
i agree. same DOF less cash. easier workflow. get istop motion or use premiere.

Mike Gifford
07-15-2008, 07:45 AM
I can think of a number of reasons why you might want to do stopframe with a RED
There are numerous techniques used in stopframe animation beyond single frame capture - multipass, slomo, gomo, ramping, capture in multiples etc etc
You might want to shoot 24 -120 fps on the same set, camera and lens that you have just shot single frame capture on.
Using cinema lenses on DSLRs is not that easy - and you might want to!
In a motion control environment REDs GPIO sockets are going to be mighty useful, not to mention its ease of rigging
A DSLR specced-up to work in a professional stopframe environment with HDSDI monitoring, remote stop/start, heatsink, lens support, OS override etc costs about the same as a RED.

Of course you can just buy a DLSR and iStopMotion and get terrific results as other posters have stated

From the tests I've seen RED can find a role in the stopframe world which DSLRs can only partially cover

just my two pence worth