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Friedrich Moser
06-18-2007, 12:28 AM
General question: who else of you is doing natur & natural history docs?

Thanks for your replies!

Friedrich Moser

planet e
06-18-2007, 06:36 AM
i've got one in the works for an environmental organization. sort of nature/science combined. we're hoping that the pre-planning comes together around the time of our RED's release. that would be ideal.

and you? what are you working on?

Friedrich Moser
06-18-2007, 08:58 AM
Hi planet e,

I'm working on a 50min prime-time tv-doc, basicly for Austria/Germany, but also an english version for the international market on the region I'm living in (www.suedtirol.info). I made my RED-reservation some days ago, it should ship in early 2008, so I hope I can shoot most of the project already Redcode 4k.

For me personally, quite a few novelties come together: First, I'm upgrading from Beta SP. Second, it's the first time I'm filming alpine wildlife (chamois, ibex, golden eagle, bearded vulture, snow grouse, marmot ...) - up to now most of my work was about man&nature. So, the places where I'll be shooting are the same, but the approach is pretty different. Third, for me it's a major leap from the quality-POV, concerning both storytelling and shooting, because I'm moving from the regional scale to the international one (but with an experienced partner who in fact runs the production and does the post. My part is screenwriting/directing/camera-work).

Luckily, the commissioning editor behind the project warned me already in november not to buy equipment at that time for there were great changes to expect in the camera market... When I first checked out the RED-site, I thought it was a joke: a ridiculously cheap cam double as good as Arri's D20 (that I had seen at IBC 2004 and perceived as from another sphere), and also, just watching those renderings all the time with very little test-footage from a sensor called "mysterium"... until this NAB I considered it the fancy of a mad millionaire, although a dream I'd have liked to share.

Well, since NAB I consider it something pretty serious and it will be a bomb, especially in our field of work: the ability to use an imense range of lenses at the tenth of the cost (or less) it would have been with HDCam (+CineStyle lenses...). The ability out in the field to do a rough-cut in order to check if the scenes visually worked (within a one-step-only workflow !). And: its 4k, so it fits well for cinema or the projection in info-points of national parks or so, too.

I started this thread to get together expertise & expectations of those REDusers who will be working in the outbacks. Which lens options did/do you choose? What power supply? Temperature/humidity issues? Third party accessories? And, last but not least, making 4k stock footage available (just to put an example: for a doc I made last year about the geological history of a canyon in the Italian Dolomites I needed footage from the Bahamas to show how a certain geological strata looked like 200 million years ago). Stock footage that's not touristic or commercial-like can be very precious, as is the possibility to engage someone living next-door to a certain motive.

So, it would be great to create a plattform within this plattform that is not so much dedicated to the feature-film/indie-film issue, but that could be a nice place to drop by just to pick up some usefull information for all those interested in nature / natural history / scientific filming.

Regards,
Friedrich Moser

planet e
06-19-2007, 02:05 AM
fascinating stuff, very aligned with my own interests.

RED could possibly be the greatest wildlife film camera ever. imagine the detail you will get with that 300 mm bomb on the end. and the new zoom with the macro feature. i can't wait. having both the macro and telephoto ends of the shooting spectrum covered out of the gate will make this camera a fantastic nature/outdoors/natural history/science tool.

although i'm sure that i will be putting RED to other uses in the course of running my production studio, the documentary project that i have in the works has a broad theme - "water" - and we are in the early development stages. we're shooting a short fund-raising demo using a pair of Canon XH A1s, but we hope to put the RED to use soon on behalf of the planet's water supply. we are working with a well-known enviro water lawyer who will be our primary fund-raiser.

i'm glad you started this thread. i hope others chime in.

Friedrich Moser
06-19-2007, 08:09 AM
sounds great! some years ago I did something on the disappearing glaciers in our region, in my current doc there will be sthg on traditional irrigation techniques that have been first mentioned around 1200 A.D. but are definitely older. By the way, South Tyrol is Europe's largest apple growing area, but this only works by using the waters that come down from our glaciers... if interested: f.moser(at)blueandgreen.info

Keith Brust
06-19-2007, 09:18 AM
Hi,

I have been shooting nat hist exclusively for about 20 years. I will be using my camera for this. Most of my work is with the BBC Natural History unit. They are very interested to see how the camera works out. I have worked on the last two Attenborough series and PLANET EARTH. I am very excited to be able to use most of my existing lenses, especially my custom probe lenses. I can't wait.

Keith

planet e
06-19-2007, 12:22 PM
PLANET EARTH rocks! totally genre re-defining! fantastic footage! riveting material!

pardon a little bit of fandom, keith. i hope i didn't gush too much, but i've been really enjoying the series. and feeling a little jealous, at times!

friedrich, i may pick your brain a little (that's kind of a chilling idiom, isn't it??) when the time is right about the relationship between the glaciers and the farming. we're still very preliminary in our planning. but it's great to have the contact. thank you.

Friedrich Moser
06-19-2007, 03:54 PM
[QUOTE=Keith Brust;52418]Hi,

"Most of my work is with the BBC Natural History unit."

Guess they know my commissioning editor from ORF ;-)

"They are very interested to see how the camera works out."

Got to tell this my producer tomorrow!

"I have worked on the last two Attenborough series and PLANET EARTH."

I'm on my knees! Which parts of Planet Earth? I am watching it over and over again. They're of a tremendous beauty! Congratulations!

Friedrich

Ed Watkins
06-19-2007, 04:22 PM
I'm currently, among other things, a grad student on a Science & Natural History Filmmaking MFA program ( http://naturefilm.montana.edu ).

I'm just about to start production on a 1 hr adaptation of the book "Into The Cool" by Eric Schnieder and Dorion Sagan (Carl Sagan's son). It's about thermodynamics and life. Should be allot of fun.

I'm incredibly jealous of you Keith. I'd give my arm, leg and probably RED to work for the BBC.

Friedrich Moser
06-19-2007, 10:39 PM
to Keith: of what RED-setup do you think that would be useful? Which lens ranges? Would you rather go with the announced Birger mount for Canon or just manually?

to planet e: don't hesitate to contact me!

Regards, Friedrich

Keith Brust
06-20-2007, 09:26 AM
to Keith: of what RED-setup do you think that would be useful? Which lens ranges? Would you rather go with the announced Birger mount for Canon or just manually?

to planet e: don't hesitate to contact me!

Regards, Friedrich


Friedrich, I am hoping to use the Bridger mount with the Canon 600 f/4. I think it will make it much easier to keep the shot steady, especially when using a teleconverter. I have many canon L lenses and look forward to using them on the RED. I also will use canon macro lenses as part of a pinhole/probe lens set up I have. I think the bridger mount will be quite useful in that scenario as well. If I find the bridger mount doesn't work as well as I anticipate then I will probably go with the Nikon lenses I have and use my Willytec follow focus.

Cheers,

Keith

Albert Cheng
06-25-2007, 01:19 PM
Planet Earth is incredible. I'm very interested in being involved in shooting natural history. How awesome is it to shoot for the BBC.

Albert Cheng
06-25-2007, 01:23 PM
Looks like I'm getting mine around October. If any of you experienced Natural History guys wanna try shooting and in return teach me a thing or two, shoot me a holler.

Friedrich Moser
06-25-2007, 01:59 PM
hi opcode,

depends on where you're based! Though my experience isn't a tenth of Keith's :huh:

Ken Corben
06-25-2007, 10:06 PM
Great thread,

Nat history is my passion. Although I have shot for all types from Wild Things, Shark Week, Nat Geo and the soon to be released Paramount feature Arctic Tale my favorite/specialty is underwater. The BBC nat-history unit has set the bar - very inspirational.

I plan to shoot all my nat history footage in Red 4K Redcode as soon as I receive my cameras. Based on the results from Gibby's #8 tests I believe we will have a firm grip on the lens choices/questions for our applications. Gibby and I have some very exciting and cutting edge projects in the works that feature Redone cameras Pole to Pole, ground breaking digital 3D based on Redone cameras displayed on RealD screens and perhaps the first underwater 3D RED 4K footage in the world (if i can pry #8 out of Gibby's hands).

Trust me when I say we plan to rig Redone cameras on every platform imaginable, and some that are totally new, to tell our nat history stories in ways that were previously impossible due to technological restraints.

It is a great time to be a filmmaker in this genre and I look forward to telling great stories with the application of RED cameras.

Sharky

Friedrich Moser
06-26-2007, 01:55 AM
hi sharky,

1. do you just dive or do filming with submarines, too?

2. mount the REDcam wherever possible - oh yesss! I'd like to know how it worked on small remote helicopters so you could fly into the crevasses of glaciers or through tight canyons or streets etc.
Do you & Gibby also plan to use/develop :innocent: a light-weighter version of this http://www.brainsandpictures.com/camcat, to make its use easier with e.g. waterfalls, eyries, climbing... ?

Regards, Friedrich

planet e
06-26-2007, 06:58 AM
hi keith, if you do go with the birger technology, i will be very interested to hear how it works in the field. among other Canon lenses, i have the legendary 200mm f/1.8 and a 100mm macro which i am most eager to test with my RED camera. it will be interesting to see how the RED macro feature in the 18-50mm RED zoom stacks up to the 100mm.

i tend towards lighter set-ups than the Beeb probably provides (there's an understatement!), which is why RED is so very exciting, to be able to schlep lighter gear unaided and get this quality of footage blows my mind.

shameless plug: i recently started a nature and outdoors online video contest, the only one of its kind, and hope to see some RED users join the fun eventually. it has attracted video producers from all over the world, Norway, UK, Arctic Circle, Sweden, South Africa, US, Australia. it's a diverse and fun group of people who are building a truly supportive international community. check it out, if you're interested. the winners have cooked up some truly outstanding images, the most recent winner having shot a truly gorgeous macro short

www.uwolchallenge.com

i'm kind of a macro/telephoto junkie.

finding this thread is like finally finding a home at reduser--thanks, friedrich!

Ken Corben
06-26-2007, 07:06 AM
1. do you just dive or do filming with submarines, too?

Where ever the story leads really. I must say one of the highlights of my career was a night dive aboard the Sealink to 1400 feet and successfully filming six-gill sharks - one shark was bigger than the sub - yikes!



2. mount the REDcam wherever possible - oh yesss! I'd like to know how it worked on small remote helicopters so you could fly into the crevasses of glaciers or through tight canyons or streets etc.
Do you & Gibby also plan to use/develop a light-weighter version of this http://www.brainsandpictures.com/camcat, to make its use easier with e.g. waterfalls, eyries, climbing... ?

You sir are a creative thinker - just add RED digital 3D to your ideas and you'll be getting warmer:cold:

Albert Cheng
06-26-2007, 08:48 PM
hi opcode,

depends on where you're based! Though my experience isn't a tenth of Keith's :huh:


I'm based in Los Angeles on the westside.

Albert Cheng
06-26-2007, 08:56 PM
Kenneth (sharkguy)! What do I have to do to assist you and Gibby on your projects. I would kill for the opportunity to help you guys. One of my dreams is to travel and shoot docs for Nat Geo and Discovery HD.

I'd seriously quit my six figure day job to schlep gear for you guys on your adventures. My Red package is at your disposal.

Ken Corben
06-27-2007, 12:09 AM
Opcode,

When I was single my response to this query was always, "you don't have the right bra size." I had a male AC once immediately respond with, "I'll get the breast implants tomorrow - do you prefer C's or D's." LOL

Check your PM - the future is very exciting...

Sharky

Friedrich Moser
06-27-2007, 12:16 AM
You sir are a creative thinker

By profession! :biggrin:

In the end from a technical POV it's a matter of stabilization: does a REDone with Birger Mount and electronically stabilized wide-angle optics need any additional gyro-stabilization? I remember to have read some impressions on those tests from BirgerEngineer. One will have to try, but I'm curious if it worked mounting a pan&tilt head on that kind of cableway they're actually using in my valley here to bring down the timber from the steep mountain slopes - those rope-systems are mobile, easily available and have ranges up to 1000 meters.

For those remote helicopter shoots: they're already doing them with the small Panasonic and Sony Camcorders. I think in this case it's a matter of stabilization and budget: I know what that one-day-shoot with Cineflex-HD in my upcoming production will cost, including mounting and unmounting, standby-fees... and yes, you get great panoramic shots, but mostly it's even more impressive to be closer when moving around your object.

Already in those specific themes: any probe-lenses that any of you would recommend for the REDcam? Light-weight dollies?

The reason why I asked Sharkguy about filming with a submarine is that I'd like to prepare something on the building of reefs. Could anyone also recommend me marine research institutes working on this topic?

Regards, Friedrich

Albert Cheng
06-27-2007, 02:51 PM
Opcode,

When I was single my response to this query was always, "you don't have the right bra size." I had a male AC once immediately respond with, "I'll get the breast implants tomorrow - do you prefer C's or D's." LOL

Check your PM - the future is very exciting...

Sharky

LOL, that's hilarious.

The future is exciting indeed. I sent you back a PM.

Ken Corben
06-27-2007, 10:09 PM
Ya,

His sense of humor was like mine - hysterical over the top. I always hired him as my AC on music vids and commercial work here in California. We would be cracking each other up on those 18 hour days on location.

On the nat history gigs if you only do one thing, like sound, it's hard to justify the flight and accommodation to the Arctic in the budget. I got hired on a major NG Explorer series as the pilot (Cessna 185 on wheel skis), underwater B camera, Surface A camera, aerial operator and rebreather technician. Only one paycheck of course.

But standing on the edge of the Arctic ice flow on a sunny day in a t-shirt with our Cessna in the background while filming a hundred or more belugas frolicking at your feet I turned to the producer and asked, "You're paying me to do this?"

Sharky

planet e
06-28-2007, 06:40 AM
what is a rebreather technician?

i think that one of my peak moments was shooting a commercial documentary in bhutan and getting rare footage of a newborn baby takin. there aren't many takins left and seeing, let alone being able to shoot, the babies is unusual...

i'd love to hear more of other people's peak moments...

Ken Corben
06-28-2007, 03:34 PM
what is a rebreather technician?

A rebreather technician is the guy that does the daily assembly, gas charging and system checks of the rebreathers on set/location. We used two of my modified O2 rebreathers to dive under the Arctic ice while filming the marine mammals for the series. Several of the more spectacular shots can be seen in the feature film Arctic Tale slated for release next month. The bubbleless life support system provides warmer breathing gas, extended range compared to Scuba and the holy grail of no bubbles.

Moir
06-28-2007, 03:38 PM
Hi planet e

I visited Bhutan last year to photograph White-bellied Herons - what a wonderful country. Was the Takin wild or in the enclosure outside Thimpu?

Lots of great wildlife moments for me, but visiting an Emperor Penguin rookery with small chicks stands out. If only I'd been able to shoot it with a Red camera!

Christian Munoz D
06-28-2007, 05:19 PM
"General question: who else of you is doing natur & natural history docs?"
Friedrich Moser

We are working on Natural History. Not with budgets as BBC NHU, but certainly we will be using the RED with several SRL lens and scopes for our work.


[QUOTE=Keith Brust;52418]
"I'm on my knees! Which parts of Planet Earth? I am watching it over and over again. They're of a tremendous beauty! Congratulations!"
Friedrich

Friedrich, you must see "Sonora: A Violent Eden" one of the Keith's Amazing docs with the great Sean Morris.

Best,
Christian

planet e
06-28-2007, 08:40 PM
thanks for the description, sharkguy. the only underwater i do is snorkeling around with a splashbag and an old GL2 on the occasional beach vacation, so it's good to know these things.

the takin was wild, although that's an oxymoron, because they have the deepest, gentlest vibe of any mammal i've ever encountered, which makes them the perfect national animal of bhutan. a most amazing place....

true story. i was in a monastery shooting, and the lama who was showing me around was talking with another fellow, and i was a little bored, so i looked out the window and saw, across a valley, a guy in robes sitting on a precipice with several prayer flags behind him. so, using a 20x zoom, i zoomed in to frame a shot, and the guy, who was initially looking out over the deep valley, turned in my direction as soon as i locked onto him, and he looked right at me and turned away, like he didn't want his picture taken. i was stunned, because i was an entire valley away, behind a monastery window. i gave up on the shot, and looked around the room for something else to shoot. i tried it a second time, and got the exact same response, the second i zoomed in on him. i took the shot anyway, but it was quite clear i had invaded his space.

that's a pretty clear, uncluttered vibe, of a guy who can feel your camera a mountain away, from within a building....

wondrous place, bhutan. quite magical.

Denis Buhot
08-02-2007, 09:23 AM
Hi planet e,

I'm working on a 50min prime-time tv-doc, basicly for Austria/Germany, but also an english version for the international market on the region I'm living in (www.suedtirol.info). I made my RED-reservation some days ago, it should ship in early 2008, so I hope I can shoot most of the project already Redcode 4k.

For me personally, quite a few novelties come together: First, I'm upgrading from Beta SP. Second, it's the first time I'm filming alpine wildlife (chamois, ibex, golden eagle, bearded vulture, snow grouse, marmot ...) - up to now most of my work was about man&nature. So, the places where I'll be shooting are the same, but the approach is pretty different. Third, for me it's a major leap from the quality-POV, concerning both storytelling and shooting, because I'm moving from the regional scale to the international one (but with an experienced partner who in fact runs the production and does the post. My part is screenwriting/directing/camera-work).

Luckily, the commissioning editor behind the project warned me already in november not to buy equipment at that time for there were great changes to expect in the camera market... When I first checked out the RED-site, I thought it was a joke: a ridiculously cheap cam double as good as Arri's D20 (that I had seen at IBC 2004 and perceived as from another sphere), and also, just watching those renderings all the time with very little test-footage from a sensor called "mysterium"... until this NAB I considered it the fancy of a mad millionaire, although a dream I'd have liked to share.

Well, since NAB I consider it something pretty serious and it will be a bomb, especially in our field of work: the ability to use an imense range of lenses at the tenth of the cost (or less) it would have been with HDCam (+CineStyle lenses...). The ability out in the field to do a rough-cut in order to check if the scenes visually worked (within a one-step-only workflow !). And: its 4k, so it fits well for cinema or the projection in info-points of national parks or so, too.

I started this thread to get together expertise & expectations of those REDusers who will be working in the outbacks. Which lens options did/do you choose? What power supply? Temperature/humidity issues? Third party accessories? And, last but not least, making 4k stock footage available (just to put an example: for a doc I made last year about the geological history of a canyon in the Italian Dolomites I needed footage from the Bahamas to show how a certain geological strata looked like 200 million years ago). Stock footage that's not touristic or commercial-like can be very precious, as is the possibility to engage someone living next-door to a certain motive.

So, it would be great to create a plattform within this plattform that is not so much dedicated to the feature-film/indie-film issue, but that could be a nice place to drop by just to pick up some usefull information for all those interested in nature / natural history / scientific filming.

Regards,
Friedrich Moser
Hi there, I am a french independent wildlife cinematographer. Last thing I did was a 50' about the european eagle-owl. I'm considering going red myself, and I'd love to know where you're standing now...is it the coming thing for us, as it seems ? Checked out flaws or impediments for our specific use ? What format do you expect to shoot in, especially using heavy 35mm canon or Nikon telephotos ? thanks for answering me, I'm getting confused a bit, since, as you know, being a wildlife specialist is often quite enough to go busy with! Regards, Denis

Friedrich Moser
08-02-2007, 12:16 PM
Salut Denis,

I am convinced it will be a great tool for wildlife. I'll be shooting Redcode RAW 4k as often as I can, and the high-speed shots at 2k/100fps (if/when enabled, there are threads about it).
Why 4k? For my archive, because as I'm not specialized, my topics will constantly change (except: mountains) for TV-productions, but there are always smaller projects for institutional purposes (info-points etc.) in between, that are made for big screens. Offering 4k makes me more competitive. And my archive will outdate more slowly.
Regarding slow-motion I count very much on the development of appropriate software for NLE-plugins and on further developments by RED.

BTW, will some of you nat-hist-people show up @IBC? I plan to be there on Friday 7th. Would be nice to have a coffee or beer with you!

Regards, Friedrich

Mike Peters
08-06-2007, 02:46 PM
I'm with a New Zealand NGO which is trying to get into natural history about NZ biodiversity. Been going for 3 years and making slow but steady progress. Bush Telly is linked to a national NGO with a good network of support amoungst conservationists. We have done one 20 minute doco and filmed bits for a number of others to be completed. Our biggest challenge has been good sound, light and camera support. Will have nailed those problems in a few months, and so the challenge then becomes getting a decent camera or two.

Till we can raise the $$, the effort will be pre production, and putting together a storyboard for each program (powerpoints). So far we have around 60 programs we want to make about NZ native plants and animals.

We are planning lots of oral history with conservation participants, and then telling the stories with all the neat stuff (birds, landscape, insects etc).

I love doing this stuff. Our small crew is learning a hell of a lot along the way. We have put a lot of the audio stuff up as internet radio programs in the meantime.

Ken Corben
08-06-2007, 07:42 PM
We are planning lots of oral history with conservation participants, and then telling the stories with all the neat stuff (birds, landscape, insects etc).

BRILLIANT! Mike this is an outstanding idea and project goal. I highly recommend that you, if you haven't already, purchase GENESIS (2005) directed by Claude Nuridsany and Marie Perennou, who previously created another acclaimed scientific documentary, Microcosmos. Study this film OVER AND OVER, set the bar for your images with REDONE based on their work and build upon their unique oral history technique and you will create programming that inspires (and sells). You will notice they use a significant amount of studio set ups with the more challenging creature behaviors and I think it works well even if the audience believes it is "in the wild." Besides, only maddogs and Englishmen (BBC) actually live in a tree for weeks at a time to get one 30 second shot (I kid the Brits. They are often my inspiration to push the envelope on my next project).

Here's a link with info and a trailer. This film is a must see for all NH filmmakers:

http://video.barnesandnoble.com/search/product.asp?ean=821575536257


I love doing this stuff. Our small crew is learning a hell of a lot along the way. We have put a lot of the audio stuff up as internet radio programs in the meantime.

The audio is as important as the video for your films. Glad to hear you are aware of that. I too love doing this stuff and look forward to seeing some of your results.

BTW - If I were in NZ I'd be working my way into Peter Jackson's 4K studio for posting my Redone originated NZ docos. Never know, might find an interesting mentor or two their?

Sharky

Mike Peters
08-06-2007, 11:44 PM
Hi Sharkguy
I get a lot of inspiration from BBC Bristol's work. Planet Earth is on the telly tonight - so I know what I'll be doing. I have seen Microcosmos - its truly inspiring.

Interesting what you say about setting the bar. When we started, we were just a bunch of conservationists planting native trees, who wanted to get some natural history programming for NZ. Our govt had just sold off NHNZ who then had to make stuff for the US market. It was a very sad day for NZ conservation.

So in 2001, we got hold of an old S-VHS camera, $10 mic from Dick Smith and a cassett tape recorder and went out there and gave it a go. It was the right way to start but the results were pretty terrible.

So we just kept going at it, learning on the job. Luckely we had quite a few good photograhers (mainly old botanists) who knew a thing about good pictures. No one in the official world believed we could do this, but we kept going. Finally convinced someone to hand over some $$$$ and started getting decent gear. We built a good edit computer and spent a hell of a lot on audio equipment. We also built everything we possibly could. Our crappy 2nd hand photo tripod got replaced by an excellent 2nd hand vinten 8. Etc etc. We found the better gear, meant we could raise the standards of what we could do, which enabled us to raise more $$.

The radio program was a very good decision. We know have a separate radio unit and are planning to rapidly increase the amount of radio programming content. We go to a lot of public talks, record the audio and combine it with the slide show images. Its really important - some of these speakers are living treasures, having spent a lifetime on some specialised area and their talks need to be recorded for the future generations.

Early this year we all went over the early filmed stuff, looked at a few old NHNZ programs to compare and biffed 95% of what we had done. I think next year we will probably do the same. But at least we have got more of an appreciation of the standards we need to work to.

Right now, we are building a 6m pipe camera crane for canopy shots, table dolly for macro shots. I'd love to find out how to make a probescope. It must be possible. Its only a periscope, with a macrolense isn't it?. I've never seen one except on the web but it looks very useful.

Yeh we figured out that a lot will have to be filmed in someones bedroom or garage. Forest floor plus blue screen on the kitchen table. Oh well - I guess we will have to make a ton of aquariums from recycled glass shelving, and learn how not to kill the little critters.

Anyway plenty to look forward to. I can see why you lot all love this stuff. Its just wonderful and so much fun.

Thanks for your encouragement.

Ken Corben
08-07-2007, 10:32 PM
Mike,

You're welcome.

Hope to see you at either Wildscreen in Bristol or JHWFF in Jackson Hole with your work.

Sharky

http://www.wildscreenfestival.org/
http://www.jhfestival.org/

Lauri Kettunen
08-08-2007, 02:17 AM
My interest in RED is also and only because the production of nature docs of northern Scandinavia. RED brings at least three significant advantages to me. Firstly, 4K format means that what is shot today can be fully exploited in the future. During the years I've been filming birds, animals, and landscapes, there has been many unique situations which cannot be repeated. Having such material in SD 4:3 format creates nowadays a sigh. Secondly, the four audio channels makes it possible to make modern multichannel audio. And third, since it is quite difficult to revert the choice of Canon lenses made years ago, the possibility to shoot with the existing lenses with the Birger EF-adapter is a very wellcome wellcome feature.

Mike Peters
08-11-2007, 01:19 AM
What lenses would be people recommend using with RED One for natural history work. I take it from the forum 6that many people are planning to use their existing older lenses eg:

Canon EF 200mm f/1.8L

Would you go manual or digital lens? My thought was to start looking for used lenses in good condition.

What would you use for Macro work?

Brice Ansel
10-11-2008, 05:49 AM
What lenses would be people recommend using with RED One for natural history work.
What would you use for Macro work?

Nikon Micro 60mm
an example of it's use here
http://www.reduser.net/forum/showthread.php?t=19223
Best regards
Brice

Dave Blackham
10-11-2008, 08:20 AM
We work on Wildlife too. Id be very interested in views on lens set ups and prefered shooting resolutions.

Dave
UK