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View Full Version : What does DIT stand for?



neelagrawal
05-15-2009, 12:30 PM
I know its a newbie question but I can't seem to remember for some reason. Thanks for the responses.

Neel

Curran Giddens
05-15-2009, 12:32 PM
Digital Imaging Technician

but for some it has kinda morphed into Digital Information Technician...

Kwan Khan
05-15-2009, 12:41 PM
Digital Imaging Technician (only)

Liam Hall
05-15-2009, 12:48 PM
Dementia Is Telling:)

Brook Willard
05-15-2009, 01:09 PM
Dork in Tent.

Kreisky
05-15-2009, 01:23 PM
Donald In Tisneyland

BigLu
05-15-2009, 08:29 PM
Dork in Tent.

That made my eye tear lol.

Michael Thornton
05-15-2009, 08:38 PM
Dabbling Idiot Tech.

LOL

Tek

Vince K
05-15-2009, 09:53 PM
Did It Transfer??!! :crying:

Rich Schaefer
05-15-2009, 10:10 PM
Do I Tell? :wink:

dino g
05-15-2009, 10:57 PM
douche in training

Jeff Kilgroe
05-16-2009, 12:15 AM
douche in training

Haha... On a recent shoot I had, people were referring to our "DIT" as "Dumbass In Training". The guy really had no clue what he was in for when he took the job. He was actually a pretty experienced gaffer (or so I was told), but he thought that knowing how to copy files qualified him for the job. Oh, the horror...

I've met a few "DIT's" who should be wearing that badge. :angry:

Tom Mitchell
05-16-2009, 10:49 AM
Damaged In Transfer.......opps

This is the bane of my life, people not knowing what a DIT stands for, or what we are supposed to do, and that is backed up by people calling themselves a DIT who don’t know themselves what a DIT is. Most people think all we do is transfer files and the a runner can do it, though why on earth you would trust the runner with the rushes is beyond me.

The practicalities the job seem simple; know the camera menus like the back of your hand. Transfer files, do a check sum, and plug and unplug some cables when it crashes.

But the truth of the matter is that only when things start going wrong, or the post house gets the files and find them unusable, or in a mess. they realise that they need a real DIT.

Firstly you need to have a understanding of exposure and how RAW exposure works, you will need to check every clip to make sure you are getting the best out of the camera and that if there are problems with noise or over exposure you can inform the DOP. And more importantly the onset manna needed to discuss this.

You will need to check every clip and reference file to make sure they all work and are intact, and to know what kind of errors to look out for. And again need to have the onset manna to deal with any problems and inform the correct people without causing a mass panic.
You also need to know how do at lealest a First light grade some productions will ask you to do this, and DOP’s to make sure they are shooting towards what they are looking for.

You will need to know how post production houses like the files organised and how to label the file correctly so that the edit suites can easily ingest the files with no hassle.
I have been asked to do on set editing for producers and directors on set to see if shots or sequences work together, at least a working knoll age on how to edit is needed.

You will need to have built up experience in the reds most common faults and how to instantly solve them and to think ahead of the production and ask for little bits a pieces that might need to be replaced. As well as the preplanning in asking what kind of setups you will be doing and what inpact that might have on the camera, will i need to use cards, or red ram, how much media will I need. Is the camera too heavy for a jimmy jib light?

You need to be really good a problem solving and to be able to do it quickly and under duress of panicked directors and producers, to both keep them calm and yourself when the sh*t is hitting the fan.
A history of camera assisting, on many jobs, you won’t be given a loader, producers think they’re saving money by doing this. So you will often be expected to step up to the plate, so you will need to know how to load.

This job roll is also different and what you do and depends on the scale, from small jobs having a DIT/Loader to big jobs needing separate loaders and several DIT’s.

This job requires that you have has some Post experience and loading experience, and some completely new skills.

There are lots of people who call themselves a DIT but very few who offer the qualifications above. So next time you know what you should be getting.

Hope that clears a few things up!

Jeff Kilgroe
05-16-2009, 11:20 AM
According to me, here's what a qualified DIT should be able to do:

* Know the camera and all accessories / components inside and out. Can assist camera crew in quickly building up or tearing down camera rigs and can troubleshoot all camera issues, and deal with any field-service issues that don't require sending the camera to RED or one of their service centers.

* Can navigate all camera menus and functions without relying on user keys, menu maps or cheat sheets.

* Must carry a complete set of tools. If there's a torx plus, hex or whatever type screw or bolt anywhere on the camera, they have the tool to fit it. This one isn't as critical of the DIT specifically, but should be provided by whoever supplies the camera and/or support for the camera. Since many, or even most, RED DIT's are also camera owners, this just reinforces my point here. Same applies to their other systems hardware, notebooks, DIT systems on a cart, etc.. Better have extra cables, be able to pull the cover off a PC / Mac and fix the damn thing.

* Knows all workflow tools in their kit as well as any other software being used for the job.

* Understands RAW, proper exposure and histograms. Can quickly identify imaging problems such as noise or undesirable artifacts such as sensor issues and compression anomalies.

* Can assemble or repair connector ends on common cables such as SDI (BNC on coax) , XLR, ethernet, etc..

* Can maintain and repair all their own gear, including computer, software, network issues. They don't stress out when a hard drive or other critical hardware crashes on set, they already have a contingency plan in place and immediately execute it so the failure is transparent to the rest of the crew.

* Solid foundation with operating their damn computer and file systems, etc.. Basic knowledge of programming principles and scripting or mark-up languages being used by workflow tools is a huge plus too. Helps if they can at least pick through an FCP XML to change a tag.

* Can communicate effectively with the director, producer, DP and camera crew.

* Oh, if he has a pet monkey that can help him copy files, that's good too.


And that sums it up. That is the ideal "DIT". Unfortunately, it seems that many "DIT's" only send their pet monkey to work some days. All the above still applies to any "DIT" who is also working on set with other cameras -- SI2K, Viper, etc... I have run across several productions that don't wish to have a full "DIT", but prefer someone who is little more than a loader, and file copy guy. Essentially a runner or PA that can occasionally also slate or do 2AC duty. I think it does a disservice to actually call such a person a "DIT". Better to call them "file copy guy", "media monkey" or bitch.

Tom Mitchell
05-16-2009, 03:34 PM
HEAR HEAR!!!!
l
although one nit pic,


"* Can assemble or repair connector ends on common cables such as SDI (BNC on coax) , XLR, ethernet, etc.."

Even though I do know how to do this, why should this be the case? if your having to repair cables that are a really inexpensive it's because you havenít brought enough spares, you should have like a whole boxes of cable with loads of spares. Though not having such a basic skill is a bit inept.

but everything else you said, I agree on. I think the term data monkeys is a good one, because if you pay peanuts thatís what you get.

Ryan Valle
05-16-2009, 03:38 PM
According to me, here's what a qualified DIT should be able to do:

* Know the camera and all accessories / components inside and out. Can assist camera crew in quickly building up or tearing down camera rigs and can troubleshoot all camera issues, and deal with any field-service issues that don't require sending the camera to RED or one of their service centers.

* Can navigate all camera menus and functions without relying on user keys, menu maps or cheat sheets.

* Must carry a complete set of tools. If there's a torx plus, hex or whatever type screw or bolt anywhere on the camera, they have the tool to fit it. This one isn't as critical of the DIT specifically, but should be provided by whoever supplies the camera and/or support for the camera. Since many, or even most, RED DIT's are also camera owners, this just reinforces my point here. Same applies to their other systems hardware, notebooks, DIT systems on a cart, etc.. Better have extra cables, be able to pull the cover off a PC / Mac and fix the damn thing.

* Knows all workflow tools in their kit as well as any other software being used for the job.

* Understands RAW, proper exposure and histograms. Can quickly identify imaging problems such as noise or undesirable artifacts such as sensor issues and compression anomalies.

* Can assemble or repair connector ends on common cables such as SDI (BNC on coax) , XLR, ethernet, etc..

* Can maintain and repair all their own gear, including computer, software, network issues. They don't stress out when a hard drive or other critical hardware crashes on set, they already have a contingency plan in place and immediately execute it so the failure is transparent to the rest of the crew.

* Solid foundation with operating their damn computer and file systems, etc.. Basic knowledge of programming principles and scripting or mark-up languages being used by workflow tools is a huge plus too. Helps if they can at least pick through an FCP XML to change a tag.

* Can communicate effectively with the director, producer, DP and camera crew.

* Oh, if he has a pet monkey that can help him copy files, that's good too.


And that sums it up. That is the ideal "DIT". Unfortunately, it seems that many "DIT's" only send their pet monkey to work some days. All the above still applies to any "DIT" who is also working on set with other cameras -- SI2K, Viper, etc... I have run across several productions that don't wish to have a full "DIT", but prefer someone who is little more than a loader, and file copy guy. Essentially a runner or PA that can occasionally also slate or do 2AC duty. I think it does a disservice to actually call such a person a "DIT". Better to call them "file copy guy", "media monkey" or bitch.

That's a lot for a "dumbass in training" to know...

:)

Vince K
05-16-2009, 03:53 PM
According to me, here's what a qualified DIT should be able to do:

* Know the camera and all accessories / components inside and out. Can assist camera crew in quickly building up or tearing down camera rigs and can troubleshoot all camera issues, and deal with any field-service issues that don't require sending the camera to RED or one of their service centers.

* Can navigate all camera menus and functions without relying on user keys, menu maps or cheat sheets.

* Must carry a complete set of tools. If there's a torx plus, hex or whatever type screw or bolt anywhere on the camera, they have the tool to fit it. This one isn't as critical of the DIT specifically, but should be provided by whoever supplies the camera and/or support for the camera. Since many, or even most, RED DIT's are also camera owners, this just reinforces my point here. Same applies to their other systems hardware, notebooks, DIT systems on a cart, etc.. Better have extra cables, be able to pull the cover off a PC / Mac and fix the damn thing.

* Knows all workflow tools in their kit as well as any other software being used for the job.

* Understands RAW, proper exposure and histograms. Can quickly identify imaging problems such as noise or undesirable artifacts such as sensor issues and compression anomalies.

* Can assemble or repair connector ends on common cables such as SDI (BNC on coax) , XLR, ethernet, etc..

* Can maintain and repair all their own gear, including computer, software, network issues. They don't stress out when a hard drive or other critical hardware crashes on set, they already have a contingency plan in place and immediately execute it so the failure is transparent to the rest of the crew.

* Solid foundation with operating their damn computer and file systems, etc.. Basic knowledge of programming principles and scripting or mark-up languages being used by workflow tools is a huge plus too. Helps if they can at least pick through an FCP XML to change a tag.

* Can communicate effectively with the director, producer, DP and camera crew.

* Oh, if he has a pet monkey that can help him copy files, that's good too.


And that sums it up. That is the ideal "DIT". Unfortunately, it seems that many "DIT's" only send their pet monkey to work some days. All the above still applies to any "DIT" who is also working on set with other cameras -- SI2K, Viper, etc... I have run across several productions that don't wish to have a full "DIT", but prefer someone who is little more than a loader, and file copy guy. Essentially a runner or PA that can occasionally also slate or do 2AC duty. I think it does a disservice to actually call such a person a "DIT". Better to call them "file copy guy", "media monkey" or bitch.

Damn....guess that means I'm a bitch...:crying:...at least I was on my last gig.
Although, I don't pretend I know everything either. I'm a 2nd who got thrown into the role...learn learn learn!! :cool:

David Doko
05-16-2009, 04:20 PM
DIT responsibilities are a gray and evolving area. I believe they now have a union classification for it in Local 600, but I haven't the guidelines in front of me to spell it how those lines are marked and I haven't been to a meeting in a long while. Perhaps someone else can spell it out the union classification because that would help people understand what the responsibilities are technically.

I've seen DITs do anything from using the "paintbox" with Cinealta cameras to be a kind of digital "loader" downloading the files. When I first AC, I try to know the menus of the cameras I work on top to bottom and if I don't know it I try to learn fast during prep, just like a film camera; there's so many new cameras I don't know how a DIT can possibly keep up so to cover your a** your should know as much as possible yourself.

Jeff Kilgroe
05-16-2009, 04:30 PM
Even though I do know how to do this, why should this be the case? if your having to repair cables that are a really inexpensive it's because you havenít brought enough spares, you should have like a whole boxes of cable with loads of spares. Though not having such a basic skill is a bit inept.

It's just a basic skill that anyone who deals with cabling should be able to handle. Sometimes it's not an issue of bringing enough spares, it's just an issue of having the right tool for the job. For example, let's say a 200ft SDI cable gets screwed up about 25 feet from one end. It's faster to just put a new end on it than it is to go unroll 200ft of new cable and re-route it, etc.. When we're talking long cable runs like that to feed video village or directors' lounge or whatever you want to call it, they're not usually a stock or ready cable in most situations. Thats where you terminate one end on a spool and unroll what you need, plus a bit more, then terminate the other end.

Cabling such as this doesn't always fall into the realm of DIT responsibility. On larger productions, there are cable techs, electricians, IT guys, etc.. But as a full-fledged DIT, the ability to do something of this nature should be well within their grasp.

I honestly don't expect a DIT to perform all of my listed duties on a production. These are just all the things, IMO, a good DIT should be capable of doing if/when their job may call for it. In an ideal world, on an ideal set, a DIT will review clips and log footage and everything will go swimmingly.


Damn....guess that means I'm a bitch...:crying:...at least I was on my last gig.
Although, I don't pretend I know everything either. I'm a 2nd who got thrown into the role...learn learn learn!! :cool:

Haha... I know that probably came across a bit brash at the end there. But I can assure you, when I call someone my bitch on a set, I mean it with the utmost respect. In fact, if I appoint you as my bitch, that means I trust you implicitly and expect you to work at my side so that everything gets done right. :beer:

And I've spent plenty of time being someone's bitch myself. I often get delegated that role when I get hired for a production and all they want from me is my camera kit and to play "bitch" to the director as a technical advisor or consultant and by the way, they would really appreciate it if I could also grab those light stands off their truck since I'm unloading all of my gear anyway.

Tanner Stauss
05-16-2009, 04:45 PM
Darwin Introduces Twice

Vince K
05-16-2009, 04:56 PM
Haha... I know that probably came across a bit brash at the end there. But I can assure you, when I call someone my bitch on a set, I mean it with the utmost respect. In fact, if I appoint you as my bitch, that means I trust you implicitly and expect you to work at my side so that everything gets done right. :beer:

And I've spent plenty of time being someone's bitch myself. I often get delegated that role when I get hired for a production and all they want from me is my camera kit and to play "bitch" to the director as a technical advisor or consultant and by the way, they would really appreciate it if I could also grab those light stands off their truck since I'm unloading all of my gear anyway.

lol...no worries...I remember when I was a cam trainee and I got to work with DOP Mark Irwin. While we were watching rushes at lunch, he pointed to my hands on the screen as I was slating, and said ...'There, you see? You finally got the framing right. That's my good little bitch." and then patted me on the back as he walked out.
As cool as that was at the moment:embarassed: that's when I realized, I was the bitch, and pretty much would ALWAYS be the bitch, until I had his gig or I was creating my own projects, and that the process wasn't going to happen anytime soon.
So, now, I'm a goooood little 'bitch' :cool:. I work as often as possible, learn as much as I can, and paddle on with a smile on my face and my eyes and ears wiiiiide open. :thumbsup:
And I absolutely believe that I'm correct in thinking that the next logical step for me is to take the 7 day workshop in LA. It can only help me right?

Alex Carr
05-16-2009, 06:24 PM
Well... 600 needs to clarify this position... They need a digital Loader Position. A 1st AC is hired because he has technical expertise with the camera system, A loader doesn't always need to know the camera 100%. DIT is not as specific a term and many people are getting into 600 as DIT when the only thing they know how to do is Copy Files and open things in RedAlert! <---- 'A Green DIGI - Loader' All of these things Checksums, file-copy, Hardware repair, software install / repair, Timecards, etc... is the job of a Loader. I want to Pull Focus, not sit in a tent... I can't if I come in as a DIT. I can only operate / DP from there.

600 will have a classification for Digi-Loader that is comparable to the rate of a 2nd AC.

I'm not saying that DIT doesn't fully cover the range of tasks that some of us do on set... I'm saying File Monkeys need to be let into 600 as a Loader not DIT.

Brook Willard
05-16-2009, 06:34 PM
There is a lot of work being done right now to iron out the specific duties of a Digital Imaging Technician as applied to data-based shows. Stay tuned.

Evin Grant
05-16-2009, 06:38 PM
I don't think file monkeys should be let in at all. There is much more to the job than downloading, a good DIT will be consulting the DP about proper exposure, contrast range even fill ratios. Not to mention doing on set grades or other "creative" services that assist the DP is making critical image decisions that are applicable in post. The DIT position is most definitely above the 2nd ACs position, depending on the experience (with the camera) of the DP it may even be at the level of the operators.

Alex Carr
05-16-2009, 06:40 PM
There is a lot of work being done right now to iron out the specific duties of a Digital Imaging Technician as applied to data-based shows. Stay tuned.

The only reason I'm not a 600 DIT is because I want to pull focus. I'm beyond a Qualified DIT, but if I can come in as a Digi-Loader... then I can move up to 1st AC and then Op and DP.

Alex Carr
05-16-2009, 06:46 PM
I don't think file monkeys should be let in at all. There is much more to the job than downloading, a good DIT will be consulting the DP about proper exposure, contrast range even fill ratios. Not to mention doing on set grades or other "creative" services that assist the DP is making critical image decisions that are applicable in post. The DIT position is most definitely above the 2nd ACs position, depending on the experience (with the camera) of the DP it may even be at the level of the operators.

Thats exactly what I mean... ANYONE can hand over $7500 to 600 and become a DIT tomorrow, it shouldn't be non-roster that way. Thats why Digi-loader fits the bill a little bit more. You must have experience to do this job... I will take DIT positions where I bring a Large Rig, do Color Timing, LTO, Offline Files, and even Dailies and send them to Post at the end of the Day. That's definitely more than a Loader, and re-rating is necessary. Thats more related to DIT, instead of only copying Files and sending to the Post House-- Thats a Loader.

Vince K
05-16-2009, 07:07 PM
Damn Irritating Thread :thumbsup:

Jonathan Stevenson
05-16-2009, 07:40 PM
Damn Irritating Thread :thumbsup:
Ziiiiing!!!

Jeff Kilgroe
05-16-2009, 08:34 PM
Damn Irritating Thread :thumbsup:

:rofl:on the nose.

neelagrawal
06-23-2009, 05:51 PM
I think I started a war with this one. Sorry guys, I'm just a 29 year old with Alzheimer's. Next time I won't ask, I promise.

Alok

Bing Bailey
06-23-2009, 06:16 PM
Damn It's Tungsten

Jeff Kilgroe
06-23-2009, 07:05 PM
Damned Immortal Thread now.... Thought we already killed it.

Michael Thornton
06-23-2009, 07:31 PM
DEAD IN TRANSLATION.

DIT is a dead word to me.

People with real skills should put other titles on your business cards now.

Let's find a new title for our self?

Tek

Florian Stadler
06-23-2009, 07:49 PM
I don't think file monkeys should be let in at all. There is much more to the job than downloading, a good DIT will be consulting the DP about proper exposure, contrast range even fill ratios. Not to mention doing on set grades or other "creative" services that assist the DP is making critical image decisions that are applicable in post. The DIT position is most definitely above the 2nd ACs position, depending on the experience (with the camera) of the DP it may even be at the level of the operators.

That's why the position of DIT is moot on Red shoots. It is a "baking in a look" in video position and has nothing lost on a single camera Red set.

We need to train our 2nd's/loaders to do proper downloads, learn to expose the image ourselves and move on from there.

DIT is necessary for video and DP's that need a crutch. It is the beauty of RAW capture that there's no need for a DIT.

Mark Stock
06-23-2009, 08:41 PM
That's why the position of DIT is moot on Red shoots. It is a "baking in a look" in video position and has nothing lost on a single camera Red set.

We need to train our 2nd's/loaders to do proper downloads, learn to expose the image ourselves and move on from there.

DIT is necessary for video and DP's that need a crutch. It is the beauty of RAW capture that there's no need for a DIT.

As a DP and a DIT I couldn't agree less.

Tom Visser
06-23-2009, 08:53 PM
on shoots without a 2nd, I usually rope the DIT into slating and other timecode logging duties.

Peter Lyons Collister, ASC
06-23-2009, 09:35 PM
What do I do if I am in Boston prepping a 30 million dollar feature with 2 REDs and the producers only want one person doing the RED Tech/ Data Wrangling? How do I find someone to fly in to do the work and help me?

I wish we could have a separate DIT and Data person but that will never happen. Cheap mentality.

Peter

Peter Lyons Collister, ASC

Florian Stadler
06-23-2009, 09:40 PM
I'm talking about single camera shoots. 2-4 cameras is a different story.

I like to organize the crew like this:

single camera: Operator, 1st AC, 2nd AC, Digital Loader, VTR. On lower budgets, 2nd/DL do double duty

2 cameras: 2 Ops, 2 firsts, 2 2nds, 1 Digital Loader, VTR

3 cameras and up: 1-2 Digital loader, 1 DIT, 2 VTR depending on complexity of project/deliverables

Florian Stadler
06-23-2009, 09:48 PM
As a DP and a DIT I couldn't agree less.

Care to elaborate?

anzyyy
06-24-2009, 01:10 PM
its Digital Image Technician.......

Brook Willard
06-24-2009, 07:22 PM
What do I do if I am in Boston prepping a 30 million dollar feature with 2 REDs and the producers only want one person doing the RED Tech/ Data Wrangling? How do I find someone to fly in to do the work and help me?

I wish we could have a separate DIT and Data person but that will never happen. Cheap mentality.

Peter

Peter Lyons Collister, ASC

Most DITs I know handle both data and teching (and all that entails beyond pressing buttons) singlehandedly. I often end up with 3-5+ cameras to deal with simultaneously and can still spend my time where I need to be - on set. Proper gear, knowledge and on-set workflow can make a single-DIT show run very smoothly.

I just got off of a shorter 7 camera show that shot 500-750GB per day, just as an example. I was still able to always be on set, able to grade footage on my system and generally assist the DP to my fullest... but never got caught up with data and usually beat the assistants out. :) [edit: don't get me wrong, this isn't something I prefer, recommend or enjoy... I think 7 is too many for one person... but it can be done].

Personally, having somebody else take care of the data freaks me out. It's not that I have a system that I don't trust others with, it's just merely that I can work more effectively when there's no guessing or catching up.

Now don't get me wrong, a 7 camera shoot is excessive for one person to remain effective. Large stunt/2nd unit days should have a few DITs to keep eyes and ears to the ground all over the place. But for a two or three camera show? One DIT should be able to handle that while spending most of his/her time where he/she is most valuable.

Roberto Lequeux
06-24-2009, 07:40 PM
It actually stands for Do It Today, a popular inspirational speaker's catch phrase.

So DO IT! TODAY!! Wohoooo!!!

Don't listen to Brook, he doesn't know what he is talking about.
I am obviously kidding but just thought I'd disclaim it. xP