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Charles Angus
08-28-2009, 07:38 PM
http://www.thefoundry.co.uk/pkg_overview.aspx?ui=CBC2593A-2C9F-4EF9-84BE-C198B0171453

Second paragraph... Announced yesterday.

Mark L. Pederson
08-28-2009, 08:25 PM
http://www.thefoundry.co.uk/pkg_overview.aspx?ui=CBC2593A-2C9F-4EF9-84BE-C198B0171453

Second paragraph... Announced yesterday.

Foundry rules!

Nuke with Rocket support will be the BOMB!

curtis_liquid9
10-06-2009, 09:06 AM
Hey,

Not sure if this is the right place for this question, but we are a small Post production house. We do most of our major shoots in RED. Lately there has been a lot of green screen compositing and After Effects is just not cutting it. Will Nuke help us out?

Simon Blackledge
10-06-2009, 09:35 AM
Nuke rocks!.. especially with Red RAW support and SDI out :)

bring on the Rocket support :)


Curtis, not cutting it in what way? Keying is alot to do with the artists ability as well as the app. But personally I'd say yes.. with multiple roto for multiple keys (needed if your doing it correctly) nuke kicks ass. But so does shake.. but no Raw support.

Si

Joel Kaye
10-06-2009, 10:11 AM
Not sure if this is the right place for this question, but we are a small Post production house. We do most of our major shoots in RED. Lately there has been a lot of green screen compositing and After Effects is just not cutting it. Will Nuke help us out?

Gotta echo the last poster. Greenscreen comping is an awful lot about the artist's ability. I'm not sure if Nuke will really help because After Effects is completely capable of finding edges, creating procedural mattes, combining multiple mattes etc. Keylight has been an amazing plugin for a long time. Try Primatte 4 though...

If you're doing a ton of rotoscoping then I think a dedicated rotoscoping app would probably be a bigger help. Maybe Nuke's roto is really good, but it's not like they are going to have better greenscreen math.

Nuke vs. After Effects is more a workflow style choice. Either app should be able to pull a perfect key and make a perfect comp. You just have to be good - good comping will never be a one click operation.

Simon Blackledge
10-06-2009, 10:19 AM
Also a good crew who actually film a decent GS are invaluable!

A well shot GS can save you soooooooooooooo much time in post.

J. A. Duran
10-06-2009, 10:52 AM
I agree with the above. To be fair, you should be taking a look at fusion as well. It supports *.r3d files as well and works with inexpensive Blackmagic design cards, like the Intensity, outputting to a HDTV via HDMI. I'm talking about Fusion 6 here.

It is true that artist's ability is important, but Keylight will usually get u 60% there, even on After Effects. IMO there's no need for NUKE or FUSION just for regular keying jobs. The change in workflow is so aggressive that it can be a little bit too hard for just rotoscoping and keying. I have been trained in combustion (similar to AE) and I can tell you need to rethink the way you comp once you jump into node-based composition.

I would also recommend "Hollywood cameraworks Visual effects for directors"...there's an extensive chapter about keying, and even 3d tracking on green screens. Very instructive.

Hope it helps.