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Antony M
04-05-2010, 10:30 AM
As far as I can see, increasing the FLUT value by 1.0 gives exactly the same result as doubling the ISO.

So setting ISO to 1280 gives me the exact same image as leaving ISO at 320 and increasing FLUT to 2.0

I have done both, exported TIFFs and compared them side by side at 100%.

So why does RedCine-X have both controls?

M Most
04-05-2010, 10:44 AM
As far as I can see, increasing the FLUT™™ value by 1.0 gives exactly the same result as doubling the ISO.

So setting ISO to 1280 gives me the exact same image as leaving ISO at 320 and increasing FLUT™™ to 2.0

I have done both, exported TIFFs and compared them side by side at 100%.

So why does RedCine-X have both controls?


Because the FLUT™ control is calibrated in tenths of a stop. It also allows for a somewhat simpler understanding of what you're doing in post - for instance, you can have your base ISO (i.e., from the camera metadata) left in place, and your "override" (i.e., the FLUT) setting indicating what you're doing to it.

Frank Cueto
04-05-2010, 10:58 AM
Well, at least on our Baselight changing the iso can make footage clip and doing it with the flut is a tad gentler (using same amounts, of course).

YMMV

David Battistella
04-05-2010, 11:02 AM
Think of FLUT™ as a way to widen the histogram without clipping the highlights. It's a gentle roll towards the highlights instead of the hard math that ISO brings into play.

Or

ISO is a light switch
FLUT is a dimmer switch

David

K. cromwell
04-05-2010, 11:15 AM
Think of FLUT™™™ as a way to widen the histogram without clipping the highlights. It's a gentle roll towards the highlights instead of the hard math that ISO brings into play.

Or

ISO is a light switch
FLUT™™ is a dimmer switch

David

Man love your analogy, great break down...

M Most
04-05-2010, 12:42 PM
Well, at least on our Baselight changing the iso can make footage clip and doing it with the FLUT™ is a tad gentler (using same amounts, of course).

YMMV

That should not be the case. Both controls are essentially the same thing, just calibrated differently. As long as you're going through the FLUT based color science, neither one should introduce clipping. If you look at the histogram this should be clear. It might look like it's clipping if you're pushing to extreme values, but it's not.

Graeme, please correct me if I'm wrong...

Graeme Nattress
04-05-2010, 01:05 PM
On new CS both ISO and FLUT do the same thing - but FLUT is very fine control, and ISO the normal level of control we're used to.

Graeme

Antony M
04-06-2010, 01:49 PM
Thank you all.

That clears that up.

BTW, where can I get a manual for RedCine-X ?
It is not in the ZIP file when I download the latest RedCine-X.

Sid Idris
04-06-2010, 03:30 PM
On new CS both ISO and FLUT™™ do the same thing - but FLUT™™ is very fine control, and ISO the normal level of control we're used to.

Graeme

what about the "exposure" control we see in Apple Color? does that do the same thing as FLUT™?

Graeme Nattress
04-06-2010, 03:34 PM
Exposure is in stops, but does allow clipping (unlike FLUT).

Graeme