Thread: KODAK Eastman T100 5247 LUT around???

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  1. #1 KODAK Eastman T100 5247 LUT around??? 
    Senior Member Miltos Pilalitos's Avatar
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    Does anyone know if there are LUTs for older film stocks like the Kodak5247 around?

    I googled the subject without any luck and KODAK's website isn't very helpful on that regard. I found technical papers on that particular stock but no information about any LUTS.

    Considering how old the stock is... I am not even sure if it is even possible for accurate LUT creation but you never know.

    any ideas?
    Miltos
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  2. #2  
    Senior Member Robino_J's Avatar
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    There is one included in Synthetic Aperture for After Effects (all versions) and you could export it to any LUT format from there. Only thing is that it's probably a 2D LUT
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  3. #3  
    Senior Member Tom Van's Avatar
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    Not Kodak5247 but maybe these other Kodak film stocks will help...

    http://juanmelara.com.au/print-film-...-for-download/
    Last edited by Tom Van; 10-12-2013 at 02:15 PM. Reason: link
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  4. #4  
    Senior Member jake blackstone's Avatar
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    Resolve V10 with Genarts OFX plugin called Film Effects. It has most popular positive and negative film stocks, including some not that common, like B/W stocks and Polaroid.If you're looking for the Kodak and Fuji LUT emulators for Resolve, that were circulating here a while ago, they are Autodesk LUTs, that are automatically installed, if you instal Smoke. So, all you have to do is to buy Smoke or ask a friend, that has one
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  5. #5  
    Senior Member Miltos Pilalitos's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Robino_J View Post
    There is one included in Synthetic Aperture for After Effects (all versions) and you could export it to any LUT format from there. Only thing is that it's probably a 2D LUT
    Thanks, I didn't know that. As you can understand I am looking for a 3D LUT but I will check this out.


    Quote Originally Posted by Tom Van View Post
    Not Kodak5247 but maybe these other Kodak film stocks will help...

    http://juanmelara.com.au/print-film-...-for-download/
    Thanks, I am aware of those. Unfortunately they are not what I am looking for but useful nevertheless. :)


    Quote Originally Posted by jake blackstone View Post
    Resolve V10 with Genarts OFX plugin called Film Effects. It has most popular positive and negative film stocks, including some not that common, like B/W stocks and Polaroid.If you're looking for the Kodak and Fuji LUT emulators for Resolve, that were circulating here a while ago, they are Autodesk LUTs, that are automatically installed, if you instal Smoke. So, all you have to do is to buy Smoke or ask a friend, that has one
    I have tried The Genarts Film Effects OFX plug in but I am not sure how accurate it is. Also, it doesn't have that particular stock (the list jumps from 5246 to 5248). I didn't know that Autodesk includes 3D Luts with Smoke. I don't know anybody who uses smoke anymore so there is nobody to ask and check it out. :)
    Miltos
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  6. #6  
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    I transferred tons of 5247 back in the day, and I remember it as being a plugged-up, dense, but chromatic kind of look. There is no "LUT" per se -- it's a look, rather than a LUT. Note that 5247 was a negative film and not a print stock, and the final look was more a combination of those two looks than anything else.

    I much, much preferred the look of the later 5219 negative stocks, which were infinitely kinder to black detail and grain. I was not sorry to see 5247 go when it was discontinued in the mid-1980s. I think people have a weird nostalgia for these ephemeral looks because of something they imagine in their heads, not something that actually existed in reality. Screen some old 1970s and early-1980s movies shot on 5247, and you'll see the reality that the films were soft and grainy. But capable of good color under optimum lighting and a great exposure.

    I think the look can be simulated pretty closely given a custom curve that crushed the blacks slightly, plus a slightly pumped-up saturation setting. And grain is just grain. The older pre-T-grain stocks have grain the size of canned hams, so it isn't very subtle.
    marc wielage, csi colorist/post consultant daVinci Resolve Certified Trainer
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  7. #7  
    Senior Member Miltos Pilalitos's Avatar
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    There is something in the look of that mid eighties films shot on 5247 that I would like to adapt for a project I am working on. It was a grainy and soft stock but I love its colors!

    Miltos
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  8. #8  
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    The problem is, so much of the look of those stills are the result of the scan and the colorist. The look is ephemeral, boiling down to the creative choices by the colorist and the person supervising those transfers. In other words, you're seeing a modern-day HD interpretation of that negative, not what it looked like projected on print in 1983.
    marc wielage, csi colorist/post consultant daVinci Resolve Certified Trainer
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  9. #9  
    Senior Member Miltos Pilalitos's Avatar
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    The current color interpretation of those films might be affected by today's colorists and new tools but even then... their look doesn't look like anything current image acquisition and their color handling produces.

    No matter how able someone is to alter and enhance colors, the source material and the way it interpreted color will always matter I think.
    Miltos
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  10. #10  
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    Quote Originally Posted by Miltos Pilalitos View Post
    No matter how able someone is to alter and enhance colors, the source material and the way it interpreted color will always matter I think.
    I would agree only in that it's the cinematographer that makes more of the difference than anything else. I've often said, you can take well-shot material and make it better, but you can't take poorly-shot material and make it good.

    I think the lighting, the choice of lenses, and the exposure all had a lot to do with why those movies looked like they did; my gut feeling is the 5247 might be the smallest part of it.

    I think a lot of people are looking for a "one-button click" solution to recreating a look, and I don't think it's that easy, particularly with the look of a specific era. And I also remember tons of shows that looked like crap that were shot on 5247, particularly for TV. Again, the lighting made all the difference.
    marc wielage, csi colorist/post consultant daVinci Resolve Certified Trainer
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