Thread: building a new system.. need help (hackintosh)

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  1. #1 building a new system.. need help (hackintosh) 
    Senior Member Zakaree Sandberg's Avatar
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    trying to put together a new system..

    Would like to transcode dragon footage as quick as possible.. at 1/2 res

    currently have a titan.. will hopefully be upgrading to the new titan or 1080TI (when available) and as long as it works with OSX


    my biggest issue is figuring out what CPU to use..

    some people were suggesting 6700k, however i feel like 4 cores wont really do it.. I currently have a 3930k (6 core)
    Zakaree Sandberg
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  2. #2  
    Don't jerk around. Get the 6950X CPU (10 cores. You're right, 4 is not enough for real R3D workflows), 128GB of 3000MHz+ rated memory and dual 1080TI (or upcoming new Titan) GPUs. And suck it up and run Windows. Unless there's awesome new chipset level support in MacOS Sierra, you're wasting your time with a Hackintosh these days. But I suppose you can set up an OSX partition on there for those times you just gotta run the better OS.
    - Jeff Kilgroe
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  3. #3  
    Senior Member Josiah Duncan's Avatar
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    Can the 6950X support more than 64GB of Ram? I didn't think i7's supported more. I know it's definitely the best out now but I was planning on the 5960X route and OCing it to 4-4.5Ghz since it's almost half the price.

    But yeah, looking like windows is oddly the *best* option for power users atm.
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  4. #4  
    Senior Member Zakaree Sandberg's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jeff Kilgroe View Post
    Don't jerk around. Get the 6950X CPU (10 cores. You're right, 4 is not enough for real R3D workflows), 128GB of 3000MHz+ rated memory and dual 1080TI (or upcoming new Titan) GPUs. And suck it up and run Windows. Unless there's awesome new chipset level support in MacOS Sierra, you're wasting your time with a Hackintosh these days. But I suppose you can set up an OSX partition on there for those times you just gotta run the better OS.

    cant use windows.. alot of my jobs require pro res transcodes, and I use pomfort Live grade
    Zakaree Sandberg
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  5. #5  
    Senior Member Steve Sherrick's Avatar
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    Zak, Scratch might be a good option for you as it can transcode to ProRes on Windows. They have a new pricing tier that makes it very affordable and can be done yearly, monthly, or perpetual depending on your needs.
    Steve Sherrick
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  6. #6 Hackintosh 
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    Unless you want to get mad every time it doesn't save a project correctly or crashes a program, I wouldn't go for the hackintosh. Yes I prefer the OS X platform, but these programs don't run correctly. Trying to find the right drivers and patches takes hours and if u don't find the correct ones it becomes a s@$t show. What I did was a have duel boot system. One ssd with OS X for everyday use and one for Windows for editing. All I have to do to boot which one I want is go into the BIOS and change which drive I want it to boot from and poof.

    Does anyone one have the kernel for the 6950x. Just cause it's an i7, doesn't mean it's compatible with the older haswell kernels. So if I were you, I would wait and keep checking tonymacx to see how many people have success with it.
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  7. #7  
    Senior Member Flo Eckhardt's Avatar
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    some x99 boards like the asus x99-e ws support up to 128 gb with an i7 ....
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  8. #8  
    Senior Member Blair S. Paulsen's Avatar
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    The Hackintosh road can be bumpy - so be sure your blood pressure can handle it ;-) If you do take the leap, I have two suggestions:

    1) Unless you're a UNIX ninja in your spare time, work with a company or individual who found where the potholes are the hard way
    2) Once you have a working setup with particular OS/RCP-X/Pomfort/etc versions working happily together - don't change anything for as long as you can manage

    I've stuck with the cMP towers (I have 4 now) because I don't want the stress of dealing with Hackintosh BS under the gun, and like you, often need to generate ProRes transcodes. BTW, there are a couple of vendors in LA who mod the old towers for our industry. You might want to at least get a quote to compare costs vs a Hackintosh before going down the rabbit hole...

    Cheers - #19
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  9. #9  
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    I've been building/using Hackintosh systems for over 3 years now with no issues. It's really not that difficult to build a working system and then keep it up and running. I generally am able to do all the latest OS updates without any issues. It's usually a matter of updating the boot loader to the latest version before updating the OS and reinstalling a couple drivers. To be safe I usually wait a few days or weeks before installing updates to see other's experience and feedback, unless there's a bug I know the update fixes and I absolutely need the bug to go away. But this should be the case even with an actual Mac and with any OS on any computer.

    System performance in OS X vs Windows is basically the same. I actually get a slightly higher Geekbench score in OS X than Windows 10. I know there's other benchmarks to look at, but I think that's pretty telling that I'm not losing anything running OS X vs Windows on a PC or running OS X on a PC vs an actual Mac Pro. Performance in Resolve is the same on all the tests and experiments I've run.

    I built my current hack in early 2014 for about $3K. It's a Asus P9X79-E WS with 4930K overclocked to 4.5GHz, 64GB RAM, Atto R608 with internal 8x4TB drives in a 28TB RAID 5 array, Titan GPU, and it scores ~28,000 Geekbench in OS X. I've scaled the system back a little (I used to have 2 Titans but now just one), so could have gotten a different motherboard for half what I spent.

    The only problem I've had is that on my motherboard the onboard USB 3.0 ports don't work with El Capitan, so I had to install a couple USB 3.0 PCIE cards to get USB 3.0, but then I ended up with more USB 3.0 ports than I had before anyway so it wasn't a big deal. If I had stuck with Yosemite or bought a motherboard with a different USB 3.0 controller (it has Asmedia vs actual Intel) then it wouldn't be an issue. As mentioned above, I could potentially fix the problem entirely by switching to a different X79 motherboard, or upgrading to X99 and a different CPU. My system is running great right now, so no reason to do any of that.

    Your best bet is to find a working build on tonymacx86.com and copy someone else's build and follow their installation instructions. And you can dual boot so you have the option of doing your work in Windows if you have an issue with OS X at some point.

    Bottom line, it doesn't make sense to buy a Mac Pro, at least not right now. Maybe not ever if they stick with only Xeons and have no internal expandability. They have extremely expensive CPUs that most people don't need what they offer. You can get an equivalent (or near equivalent) core count with i7 Extreme for less money AND be able to overclock and actually get better performance. And you can get a better GPU of your choice vs being locked into whatever Apple's current GPU provider is willing or even able to provide in Apple's proprietary design. It then also becomes upgradeable so your overall investment lasts longer, resulting in a better ROI.

    Lower cost and better performance and still run the best OS = no brainer.
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  10. #10  
    Senior Member Zakaree Sandberg's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by mike percelli View Post
    Unless you want to get mad every time it doesn't save a project correctly or crashes a program, I wouldn't go for the hackintosh. Yes I prefer the OS X platform, but these programs don't run correctly. Trying to find the right drivers and patches takes hours and if u don't find the correct ones it becomes a s@$t show. What I did was a have duel boot system. One ssd with OS X for everyday use and one for Windows for editing. All I have to do to boot which one I want is go into the BIOS and change which drive I want it to boot from and poof.

    Does anyone one have the kernel for the 6950x. Just cause it's an i7, doesn't mean it's compatible with the older haswell kernels. So if I were you, I would wait and keep checking tonymacx to see how many people have success with it.
    i have been building and using hackintosh for about 6 years now.. never had an issue

    im not really needing a guide on hackintosh.. I just need to figure out what is the latest and proven CPU to use
    Zakaree Sandberg
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