Thread: Cook Anamorphic Lenses & Red S8K Helium Camera

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  1. #231  
    Quote Originally Posted by Humberto Rivera View Post
    [...] The Cooke S7/i have lots of lenses so you have a choices between; 16 mm,18 mm, 21 mm, 25 mm, 27 mm, 32 mm, 40 mm, 50 mm, 65 mm, 75 mm, 100 mm, 135 mm and the soon to be announced 300 mm, all T2. [...]
    Holy crow! A 300m T2 Cooke s7/i would be HUGE! I will note for the record that many vendors get wrong the specs of the S4/i 300mm (listing it on their website as T2 instead of T2.8) and at least one vendor gets wrong the aperture of the anamorphic 300mm (listing it as T2.3 instead of T3.5). I'm not saying you are in error about the upcoming announcement, but the badly formatted spec sheet on the Cooke website only lists the 300mm as being T3.3. If they did ultimately ship a 300mm T2, it would be the perfect lens for a museum shot--as the subject!
    Michael Tiemann, Chapel Hill NC

    "Dream so big you can share!"
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  2. #232  
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    Michael, you may be right, Les Zellan only mentioned a 300 mm lens without any T Stop setting, my bad! The 300 mm T2 lens was my interpretation based on the fact that Cooke would maybe like to keep their entire range of Cooke S7/i lenses at T2. So I guess that we’ll have to wait till the announcement is made, my apologies.

    Humberto Rivera
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  3. #233  
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    https://www.theguardian.com/film/202...dustry-tell-us

    “Work in the film industry? Tell us how coronavirus has affected you"

    "Releases are being cancelled, shoots scrapped and ticket sales are in free fall. But what’s the human cost? We want to hear from people on the frontline of the industry. It’s becoming increasingly clear that most sectors have not faced a crisis in modern times remotely on the scale of coronavirus. The threat it poses to most businesses, the people employed by them and the economies propped up by them, it hard to underestimate. Film is no exception. Already, the impact of widespread cinema closures around the globe, combined with endless release and event postponements or cancellations, as well as production mayhem, is estimated to cost the industry more than $20bn. Given that this figure was $5bn a week before, it seems safe to assume it’s at the conservative end."

    "We want to hear from people within the industry about how it’s affecting them. From film-makers, cast and crew whose movie was in production or perhaps all set to premiere at SXSW but which may now struggle to see the light of day. From people in streaming services, about how inundated with offers they currently are, and from producers, studios and distributors weighing up the pros and cons of going digital only, pushing back, or clinging on to the original schedule in case things miraculously improve. From festival programmers trying to decide how best to proceed."

    "From freelance composers and accent coaches, from caterers and cinematographers, film certificate classifiers, personal publicists and poster designers. We also want to hear from people on the frontline: from ushers and managers of multiplexes and indies, from concession stall owners, cleaners and people working at screening rooms. This doesn’t begin to cover the people affected. So, if you’re one of them, please get in touch and let us know your story and how best we should be covering the place of cinema in this crisis. Drop an email to catherine.shoard@theguardian.com and andrew.pulver@theguardian.com.”

    Humberto Rivera
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  4. #234  
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    “Over one hour everything was cancelled' – how coronavirus devastated the film industry”

    https://www.theguardian.com/film/202...us-impact-film

    “From directors to independent cinema owners, freelancers to company owners: people in the film business on their struggles in a time of crisis”

    “This time last week, it still seemed feasible the film industry might weather coronavirus. Only a handful of big-name blockbusters had been postponed in the UK and US, Cannes remained bullish and box office numbers weren’t wobbling too much. By Monday, the picture was radically cracked. Ticket sales in those territories were pitiful. Distributors cancelled release after release. Cinema chains started shutting their doors. And, behind the scenes, the livelihoods of hundreds of thousands of people were destroyed. We posted a callout on Monday asking for people’s stories; we’ve had hundreds responses, almost all of them full of shock, upset and confusion. The questions left unanswered aren’t just about how to pay the bills; but whether the industry can ever recover, and – as Chinese cinemas nervously start to reopen – how best to try and rebuild.”

    Humberto Rivera
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  5. #235  
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    https://www.theguardian.com/film/202...virus-shutdown

    “Film crew and cinema staff still face crisis after coronavirus shutdown”

    “Freelance and self-employed workers are in ‘precarious financial position’ as many fear they are falling through the cracks”

    "Production crew and cinema staff still fear losing their jobs and income despite UK government plans to address loss of income and jobs after the coronavirus pandemic brought the film industry virtually to a standstill. After a national cinema closure came into effect on 17 March, the actions of the UK’s biggest chains, including Cineworld and the Cineworld-owned Picturehouse, sparked widespread protest. Both chains, as well as Odeon and Empire Cinemas, have now said they will furlough employees along the lines of the government’s coronavirus job retention scheme, which offers to cover 80% of employees’ wages. However, Cineworld Action Group, formed of employees in the UK, has said that while they have been told that redundancies were reversed, some employees have not received confirmation that their jobs are protected. “Anxieties are still running high due to the lack of communication and clarity. We hope that Cineworld will apologise to all staff for the way we were treated and that they will top up the remaining 20% of our wages.”

    Humberto Rivera
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  6. #236  
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    ……… Continued from Post # 227

    What does the Director do, exactly what? We previously said in post #227; “A Motion Picture Production is forever, yes forever! It all starts with the script and how the director interpret-it as it’s adapted to the screen, is that adaptation that defines the Director’s work. I’s a combination of the written word, mixed with the mental visualization of the Director, and comingled with everyone’s crew contribution, captured by the camera and enhanced with VFX, passed thought the mind of the Director. The actor’s interpretations of the characters. That’s in essence the creation of a motion picture, a collaborative effort. This is just one person OPINION, there are many opinions in the World of Filmmaking.”

    The Director must SIMULTANEOUSLY do everything with everyone, the Actors at the first Cold Reading of the Script and subsequent rehearsals, the Director of Photography, script notations with the Script Supervisor, the Production Designer, the Costume Designer, Make Up, the VFX folks, with EVERYONE SIMULTANEOUSLY. There are endless meetings, test, and planning till the first day of Production, all of that has to be continually shaped though the mind of the director. It’s as if the director’s brain is an actual piece of equipment that’s ever present, a very important part of the production, he must continue to write everting that passes through his brain (or the note taker), draws on his memories, experiences, and the collective contribution of all on the production. Collectively a Motion Picture Film draws on the creative talents of Actors, Director of Photography, Composers, Dancers, and Writers, everyone you can think of.

    So what is-it about Film School that makes it one of the ideal places to attend on the way to becoming a filmmaker, it’s not the only way, but definitely one of the ways. What’s another way; make a film, watched a lot of films from differently places, watch them more than once, the second time you tend to see more than the first time. Write notes to yourself about the films. So what are you after? What are you looking for? You’re looking for a way get sensitize all the information into an abstract concept in your mind that has to translate into visual images on the screen. That’s a mouthful! How do you do that? Where does that transformation occur?

    You have to convey whatever is on you mind to the actors, so they can project feelings and actions trough their own interpretations. You have to articulate that image in your mind into clear instructions to the writers in cinematic terms, to the director of photography in visual terms, the lighting crew, and everyone down the line right down to the though the editing and visualization phase. It’s really a big job. You have to constantly be willing to change your “mental image” here and there according to the feedback from everyone, but at the same time be assertive enough, that you have the last word. You have to keep everyone happy so you get their best work. A good interpretation this can be found in the film “Day for Night” by French Director, François Truffaut.
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Day_for_Night_(film)

    I affectionately remember, Lester Novros, a professor at USC Cinema and mentor, which no one understood, but we were told “one day in the future you will understand”, and sure enough that day eventually came, “the lights in my brain was tuned on bright”. It was part of the process of abstract thinking, you did it without knowing why, till it became clear why. Lester was a genius; “Former student and friend George Lucas penned these words for the introduction of the manuscript: "The first time I truly understood the unique quality of film was when I took Les Novros' class. Stressing that film is a kinetic medium, Les has kept the Eisenstienian flame burning at USC, and it is a tradition that has strongly influenced my work."
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lester_Novros

    There was a book in Lester Novros class, mine was a blank 17” X 26” artist sketched book, we all began the notebook at the begging of the class and finished it by the end. I kept mine for 30 years after attending USC Cinema, and I consulted-it once in a while for that period of time. The notebook was composed of various images taken from magazines and other image based reservoirs; there where cutouts of abstract drawings in colors, tones, and shapes; and various kinds of kinetic images samples from different illustrations. All told my book was about 60 pages on both sides. I still remember an image of a winter scene, a horseman framed through the barn doors of a snowy Western setting. I know that my-not-seem like much, but each image that we chose was an unexplained scene for later use, and the totality of the notebook had a particular sensory reminded to each one of us. I can’t explain it, not here, I would have to really think hard and long about it before I found the words, if at all. But it was truly inspirational for each one of us, it kinetic abstract interpretation brought to the forth-front to our thinking at that time. The book was the culmination of abstract thinking through mine eyes, each book was different, according to its author.

    What is a “Kinetic medium”? It implies the visual of the communications of movement through various indicators that solicits the moments in your mind. Cinema. A kinetic abstract interpretation of the past, in the present going through you brain? It was if-as the abstract images in our books served as a way of being a carrier for that time when you needed to dig down in your mind, to excavate your intelligence for a solution that was there but not visible. It was bit foggy. You needed to find-it and bring it forth for the moment, a moment that could be any time needed. It was swoosh motion, it was a series of fast cuts, it was complex dolly shot, it was an aerial shot that began on a flat car on a train and lifted up in a helicopter to reveal the train moving across the plain. You get the idea.

    I remember when I was in the U.S. Marine Corps, (early 1970’s) sitting at home at my desk filling a reporter’s notebook at night (no computers or cellular phones existed then) with the notes for next day’s shooting, and then sitting at the same desk early in the morning before my daughter went off to school, going over the same notes before heading off for the USMC East Coast Motion Production Unit in Quantico, Virginia, we all got to start somewhere, that’s after attending the USC Cinema School (that’s what it was called then, in the early 1970’s). I remember Lester Novros saying in his abstract sort of way during his "Filmic Expression" class, something that trigger a thought that brought forth everything that lay dormant deep in my mind. Suddenly a connection was made between my notebook, my thoughts at the time, and what I was about to do for the day. Wow, Shazam, holy cow! I was that kind of moment. Here are some recommended Wikipedia reference for those of you that might be interested in exploring the subject.
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Name_Above_the_Title by https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Frank_Capra
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Day_for_Night_(film)
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Citizen_Kane
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Singin%27_in_the_Rain
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Casablanca_(film)
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sergei_Eisenstein and https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Battleship_Potemkin

    So I leave you with this thought. We’re are all different, we have different backgrounds and interest. But we have one thing in common, we like to make Motion Pictures, Films, Cinema, whatever we chose to call it, we love filmmaking. We’ve seen the Motion Picture Filmmaking go through different changes over the years, from “Old Yellow Box” to “Digital Cinema” but it’s about the abstract content that makes filmmakers be the interpreters that create Cinema for the audience. I’m still unable to decide which one is better, between a “Super Panavision 70” image, or “Digital Cinema” image. A Motion Picture is forever, so do a good job, for better or worst your name will be attached to any film you worked-on forever. I remember over the years in the box that says occupation as you cross international borders always putting down on any Countries Custom’s Form; FILMMAKER for the last 50 years or so, before that it was U.S. Marine. That’s my opinion.

    Humberto Rivera
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  7. #237  
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    New Cooke Lenses

    https://www.cookeoptics.com/u/news.h...orphic-ffp-180

    “Cooke Optics announces new focal lengths for S7/i and Anamorphic/i Full Frame Plus ranges”

    ”Cooke continues to grow their S7/i range with the introduction of the 300mm S7/i as well as their Anamorphic/i Full Frame Plus range with the new 180mm. In addition, Cooke is announcing a new branch of the S7/i family by introducing three 1:1 macro Full Frame Plus lenses: 60mm, 90mm and 150mm. All lenses are designed from the ground up, as real motion picture lenses. The webinar also provided an opportunity to discuss the latest developments for the /i Technology lens metadata standard, including the most recent productions that have benefited from utilising the technology, and updates on the Cooke Optics TV educational channel and the ShotOnCooke curated motion gallery. Les Zellan, Chairman, Cooke Optics, said, “We’re disappointed that we are unable to see many of our international friends at NAB this year, but this webinar gave people the opportunity to hear more about the new lenses, find out what else we are working on including Cooke Optics TV and #ShotOnCooke, and ask the questions that they would have been able to discuss on the stand.”

    Humberto Rivera
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  8. #238  
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    The Cooke S7/i are shaping-up to be a rather compete set of Full Frame Lenses from the full range of 14 spherical lenses; 16 mm, 18 mm, 21 mm, 25 mm, 27 mm, 32 mm, 40 mm, 50 mm, 65 mm, 75 mm, 100 mm, 135mm, 180 mm, and 300 mm. Now with three Macro lenses 60 mm, 90 mm, and 150 mm. Well there’re definitely a well-rounded set of lenses. Well suited for the Red 8K MONSTRO Camera, a hard combination to beat.

    https://www.fdtimes.com/2020/04/25/c...0-mm-macro-11/

    “Cooke S7/i FF+ 60, 90, 150 mm Macro 1:1”

    “We are introducing a new branch of the S7/i family—the 60mm, 90mm and 150mm 1:1 Full Frame Macro lenses,” Les Zellan said in our interview at the factory. He continued, “Most of our lenses have an MOD (Mininum Object Distance) of roughly 10 times the focal length. Over the years, we’ve been asked to do macro lenses and we’ve done it with the Panchro Classic 65mm and the Anamorphic 65mm and now the Full Frame Anamorphic 85m. “The new 60, 90 and 150 mm S7/i Full Frame Macros include /i lens metadata, which we’re very proud of.” By the way, 1:1 Magnification in a Macro means you can focus down to fill the frame with an object that is 36×24 mm or 40 x 20mm actual size.”

    Humberto Rivera
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  9. #239  
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    New Cooke Lenses for 2020

    https://www.cinema5d.com/cooke-lense...nd-cooke-look/
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?time_c...ature=emb_logo

    For this year’s NAB which never happened, Cooke introduced five new lenses – four spherical and one anamorphic. The new spherical lenses include:

    • Cooke S7/i FF+ 300mm T3.3 prime which extends the S7/i FF+ lens set on the long focal length side.
    • Cooke S7/i FF+ 1:1 MACRO 60mm T2.5 lens
    • Cooke S7/i FF+ 1:1 MACRO 90mm T2.5 lens
    • Cooke S7/i FF+ 1:1 MACRO 150mm T2.5 lens

    The anamorphic lens lineup grew with the new 180mm T2.3 1.8X Macro Anamorphic Lens.

    Cooke Look Stays Premium

    “Cooke’s lenses have always been a synonym for premium high-end cinema productions. Their lineup is mostly aimed at rental houses as the cost of a Cooke lens set usually is well beyond what a camera owner/operator can afford. The most affordable line of cinema prime lenses that the company offers is the Cooke Mini S4 (at around $7,300 per piece). Les told us that Cooke is not planning on releasing a more affordable line of lenses. Unlike some of their competitors, they will not go the path of rehousing stills lenses. According to Les, the Cooke look is a set of specifications that gives their optical designers a box to work in. They have to find the new design within those parameters so that the lens has that unique look. If you want to examine the unique “Cooke Look”, you can check out “Shot on Cooke” which is a kind of online library showcasing videos shot on Cooke lenses. There are also lots of useful technical information with each video. Do you have experience shooting with Cooke lenses? Do you like the Cooke Look? Let us know in the comments underneath the article.”

    Humberto Rivera
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  10. #240  
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    Lost in Space finds contrast in the darkness with Cooke 5/i Lenses

    https://www.cookeoptics.com/u/news.h...st-in-space-5i

    “We chose a 2.20:1 aspect ratio so we could hold more of the family in group shots within the same frame, without having to cut between them,” said McCurdy. “This also gave us a much greater landscape to view, so it immediately provided a more cinematic language and a broader scope to play with.” McCurdy shot the first season with RED HELIUM cameras and Leica Summilux C lenses, but changed to a combination of RED MONSTRO cameras with Cooke 5/i lenses for Season 2. “I’ve always been a fan of RED. I have stood by them since the first incarnation of the RED ONE and for me sensors are like film stocks - you just want to find the right stock (sensor) for the right project. So, we tested the MONSTRO sensor and, as I expected, it was perfect for Lost in Space. It gave us a lot more flexibility than many other sensors would have afforded us,” he explained. “As for lenses, in Season 1 I found that in the final colour correction, the blacks were a little too severe for me – it was purely a personal aesthetic, but I couldn't maintain the shadow lift that I’d seen on set when it came to the final HDR grade.”

    Humberto Rivera
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