Thread: Mixing different ISOs in resolve

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  1. #1 Mixing different ISOs in resolve 
    Hi Everyone,

    I wanted to see if it was possible to mix different isos in Resolve... For example, I have a shot where the highlights look perfect at 100iso, but everything else is significantly under exposed, then at 1000iso the midtones and everything else is right where I want it, but the highlights are blown out (see attached images). Is it possible to combine these two exposure into one shot within resolve?
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  2. #2  
    That is unnecessary. Pick a single ISO value which gives a balanced signal distribution and adjust shadows/mids/highlights.
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  3. #3  
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    What Hrvoje said. Or use masks/power windows.
    Plus, why didn't You light (better)?
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  4. #4  
    I tried that initially, but it didn't yield the results I was looking for - the roll-off between the midtones to shadows or highlights was very "crunchy" and it never look quite right. Is it possible to create two nodes where the ISO is 100 on one and 1000 on the other within resolve and then mix them?

    No lighting on this one, its a DR and post test.
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  5. #5  
    Senior Member Andrew Gentle's Avatar
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    I think you'd need to use two video layers and then come up with a way to blend them if you wanted to do this and the results could be unexpected in the transitional areas, unless you had a hard separation between the areas of dark and light.
    If you are talking just about the shot you've attached, it does look like you should be able to pick ISO 400ish and then brighten the subjects a little and darken the edges of the frame with power windows easily enough.
    Scarlet-X DRAGON #64
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  6. #6  
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jesse Rambis View Post
    I tried that initially, but it didn't yield the results I was looking for - the roll-off between the midtones to shadows or highlights was very "crunchy" and it never look quite right. Is it possible to create two nodes where the ISO is 100 on one and 1000 on the other within resolve and then mix them?
    No, but it is possible to use power windows to balance the various factors together. No amount of color correction can fix bad lighting; having sufficient fill is important for all cameras (Red included). As long as there's enough fill, you don't have to worry about loss of detail depending on how contrast is added during final color.

    Andrew has the general idea above.
    marc wielage, csi • colorist/post consultant • daVinci Resolve Certified Trainer
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  7. #7  
    Quote Originally Posted by Jesse Rambis View Post
    I tried that initially, but it didn't yield the results I was looking for - the roll-off between the midtones to shadows or highlights was very "crunchy" and it never look quite right. Is it possible to create two nodes where the ISO is 100 on one and 1000 on the other within resolve and then mix them?

    No lighting on this one, its a DR and post test.
    If it's a DR and post test, I suggest testing how to do it the proper way instead of having to compensate with acrobatics. The latter is cool for exploration but not for compensation. Not sure what "crunchy" means to you but if it didn't feel good you did something wrong, or just didn't spend enough effort on finesse.
    Analog > Apollo wooden handgrip http://omeneo.com
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    volamos por el universo incentivados por la esperanza"

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    Jung/ Carol
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  8. #8  
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jesse Rambis View Post
    I tried that initially, but it didn't yield the results I was looking for - the roll-off between the midtones to shadows or highlights was very "crunchy" and it never look quite right. Is it possible to create two nodes where the ISO is 100 on one and 1000 on the other within resolve and then mix them?

    No lighting on this one, its a DR and post test.
    Ah...
    Use different gamma space then! RLF is cool. Log3G10 too.
    Manually create contrast (Contrast, Curves, Levels, Alchemy...) and pop Saturation to Your likings! Or somethin'...

    P.S.
    Don't know about two nodes, never used Resolve.
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  9. #9  
    Use one layer with low iso one with high and a key in layer in between that let the low iso into the highlights and the high iso into the lowlights and then grade the key layer so it blends to your liking.
    Björn Benckert
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  10. #10  
    Quote Originally Posted by Marc Wielage View Post
    No, but it is possible to use power windows to balance the various factors together. No amount of color correction can fix bad lighting; having sufficient fill is important for all cameras (Red included). As long as there's enough fill, you don't have to worry about loss of detail depending on how contrast is added during final color.

    Andrew has the general idea above.
    This ^

    Now, there are cases where you really do have a truly high dynamic range scene and you truly do want to map that high dynamic range into a narrower dynamic range. For example, to capture some detail in the sky, good exposure on the main subject, and some details in the shadows. HDRx and tone-mapping can help. What you don't want to do is to try to correct an erroneous lack of illumination of your subject that happens to be in the shadows against a super-bright background and try to construct, in post, the lighting you should have gotten right during the shot.
    Michael Tiemann, Chapel Hill NC

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