Thread: Question about time-lapse on the red

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  1. #21  
    Senior Member Russ Fill's Avatar
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    Yeah you never know how much you miss something until you go to use it and it not there. I hope we will see it back to full starship power in the release build.
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  2. #22  
    Senior Member Rakesh Malik's Avatar
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    Same here. I haven't even had a chance to experiment with it yet, but I'm hoping to get that back so that I can put it to use. :)
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  3. #23  
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    Does anyone have any suggestions where I can use my existing v mount batteries and combine them where I have longer run time on my camera? I also talked to RED about what would be the best way get the right exposure on a long time lapse. They mention to me that I should try to get the histogram centered so in post I have a little bit of bandwidth to change the exposure. What are your thoughts or techniques? What do you think the best frame rate would be?
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  4. #24  
    Senior Member Rakesh Malik's Avatar
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    Until we figure out a way to implement bulb ramping on our Reds, that's probably a good way to handle exposure. You can predict which way the exposure will go in some situations, like a sunset or sunrise time lapse. I overexposed the sunset time lapse a bit, just being careful to avoid clipping.

    The best frame rate varies a lot based on what you're shooting, and how much you are looking to accelerate the apparent motion. There are books and resources on time lapse photography that make for a good start, but there's no substitute for just trying things out and learning for yourself. It's an art form; there's really no one particular formula, other than as a starting point.
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  5. #25  
    Senior Member Michael Lindsay's Avatar
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    Frame summing Etc is cool..

    BLack balance

    Don't use LOw light OLPF for TL

    DSMC2 and mx sensor cameras have more stable blacks when doing 1fps stuff..

    Shoot 1fps at 360 shutter works nicely as 0.5fps with a natural shutter if you rip out every other frame in post.. this is modest TL and works well for people.

    Double check you have carefully BLack balanced
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  6. #26  
    Senior Member Rui Guerra's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Björn Benckert View Post
    what is especially cool with red when time lapsing are 3 things.

    Hi Bjorn,

    1. HDRx you simply can get a short exposure whitin your exposure.
    2. 360 shutter. Simply you can use this to later compile multiple frames in post to get variable exposure and speed of your clip without getting steppiness in your motion blur.
    3. In camera frame suming and frame adding functions somthing not seen in many still cameras which is a great way to increase exposure times without added brightness / frame average or frame adding that increase the exposure by adding frames together.

    shooting red also gives the possibility to have instant playback when done.

    And the 1tb mags and compressed raw gives pretty outstanding posibilities for clip lenghts / runtime.
    Very interesting points, but would like to get soem additional info on this:

    1 - Using HDRx means that you have two separate clips at the same time. I guess you mean that if you prefer a non-timelapse clip you just use the shorter exposure one (X frame)?

    2 - Why 360 shutter and not 180? Can you elaborate a bit on that post processo to have that stepless motion?

    3 - Some examples on when you find its better to use frame adding or frame average?

    Thanks!
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  7. #27  
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    Yes,Bjorn .thanks a lot by advance if you can elaborate the frame summing or averaging mode.
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  8. #28  
    Quote Originally Posted by Rui Guerra View Post
    Very interesting points, but would like to get soem additional info on this:

    1 - Using HDRx means that you have two separate clips at the same time. I guess you mean that if you prefer a non-timelapse clip you just use the shorter exposure one (X frame)?
    No. If you are doing a timelapse during an eclipse (where there is a considerable change of lighting value), you can use the long frames to get much less noisy pictures while the sun is blotted out, and you can use the short frames to get much better control of highlights when the sun is not blotted out. Similarly one can use the same approach--exclusively within the timelaps--for the different lighting values before/after sunrise/sunset, effect of clouds, etc.

    2 - Why 360 shutter and not 180? Can you elaborate a bit on that post processo to have that stepless motion?
    You clearly understand that motion blur looks natural at 180 degrees. What is 180 degrees when shooting a timelapse compressing 10 seconds into a single frame? The answer is simple: it's 5 seconds on, 5 seconds off. How do you get 5 seconds on? 5 continuous 1-second exposures. How do you get 5 seconds off? Skip the next 5 frames. If you shoot with a 180 degree shutter and then try to compose 5 frames into a single frame, you'll see the stutters.

    3 - Some examples on when you find its better to use frame adding or frame average?
    Frame adding can be accomplished very simply: take your timelapse clip, duplicate and offset it 5 times, using the composite mode Add. Turn that into a compound clip, then speed up the Compound clip by 10x. Each frame of the compound clip will be the sum of 5 frames, followed by another sum of 5 frames, 10 frames from the start of the first.

    Averaging is a little trickier: you have to add and then divide by the number of frames you are adding. Since most systems don't have a good way to do division, you need to multiply by a value that's 1/#frames you want to average.
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  9. #29  
    Senior Member Rui Guerra's Avatar
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    Hi Michael,

    Thank you for the detailed explanations.

    Regarding the last part (frame adding and averaging), there is also an in-camera frame processing to that, at least according to the name. Have you already try it? Do you have some advice about in which situations one can use each of those kinds of in-camera frame processing?

    Thanks for your precious help!

    Best,
    Rui Guerra - PHOTOGUERRA Underwater Productions, Lda.
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  10. #30  
    Quote Originally Posted by Rui Guerra View Post
    Hi Michael,

    Thank you for the detailed explanations.

    Regarding the last part (frame adding and averaging), there is also an in-camera frame processing to that, at least according to the name. Have you already try it? Do you have some advice about in which situations one can use each of those kinds of in-camera frame processing?

    Thanks for your precious help!

    Best,
    In-camera frame processing is good for some things, but it is useful only in context. What I explained was a general way of thinking about motion blur in time lapse photography. From there you can use frame averaging to get even longer shutter times, but that limits your post-processing flexibility rather than increases it. I tried to explain the most flexible solution that is most general.
    Michael Tiemann, Chapel Hill NC

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