Thread: Imac screen calibration

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  1. #21  
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    Quote Originally Posted by Anthony Berenato Jr View Post
    Honestly, I used use a Spyder 5 Elite with some of my own settings for backlight and it's been translating very well between different mediums - including a DCP theater release. Every time I double check my calibration, my eyes are set ablaze with blue light when the calibration is turned off.

    I'm sure other have more professional means, but I'm fairly happy right now. Just turn off the ambient light sensor. Backlight at 100, D6500, 2.2 Gamma, advanced grays.
    u're "grading" DCP releases on that screen, calibrated with a Spyder (out of all probes) ?

    Wow.

    I'm gonna be the first one to say: DO NOT DO THIS. ;-)))
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  2. #22  
    Senior Member Anton Shavlik's Avatar
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    How do you calibrate an iMac screen?

    In the past no matter what profile I use, VLC, Premiere and Resolve will ignore it (resolve has a check box at least).
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  3. #23  
    Senior Member Steve DiMaggio's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mike Nagel View Post
    u're "grading" DCP releases on that screen, calibrated with a Spyder (out of all probes) ?

    Wow.

    I'm gonna be the first one to say: DO NOT DO THIS. ;-)))
    so here is my question, as I don't do this type of critical work, is it better to leave a screen like the imac stock or to use something like a spyder? Like its better to not use any filter rather than using a crap one type of thing

    steve
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  4. #24  
    Senior Member Steve DiMaggio's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Anton Shavlik View Post
    How do you calibrate an iMac screen?

    In the past no matter what profile I use, VLC, Premiere and Resolve will ignore it (resolve has a check box at least).
    I only use fcpx, never use a calibrating software, I (probably incorrectly) assumed that when using calibrating software either you would save/load a preset that you make into your display settings or use a lut in your NLE of choice

    steve
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  5. #25  
    Senior Member Anton Shavlik's Avatar
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    I can tell you that by default those 3 apps ignore changes to apple's "system preferences - display - color" in their preview windows. Calibrations changes from there will effect things like youtube on web browsers and quicktime player etc, but not those professional apps. Resolve has a checkbox under "project settings - color management - use mac display color" which will disable that and actually use your mac calibration, I'm unsure how FCPX works.

    Good to know that if someone sends you a clip its best to watch in VLC if you're on an uncalibrated screen. Never watch in quicktime, and for more reasons than just that.
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  6. #26  
    Senior Member Steve DiMaggio's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Anton Shavlik View Post
    I can tell you that by default those 3 apps ignore changes to apple's "system preferences - display - color" in their preview windows. Calibrations changes from there will effect things like youtube on web browsers and quicktime player etc, but not those professional apps. Resolve has a checkbox under "project settings - color management - use mac display color" which will disable that and actually use your mac calibration, I'm unsure how FCPX works.

    Good to know that if someone sends you a clip its best to watch in VLC if you're on an uncalibrated screen. Never watch in quicktime, and for more reasons than just that.
    that is why I ask, thanks! I had no idea

    steve
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  7. #27  
    Senior Member Steve Sherrick's Avatar
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    Here's one way to do it with Resolve.
    https://hub.displaycal.net/wiki/3d-l...w-for-resolve/
    Steve Sherrick
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  8. #28  
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    Quote Originally Posted by Steve DiMaggio View Post
    so here is my question, as I don't do this type of critical work, is it better to leave a screen like the imac stock or to use something like a spyder? Like its better to not use any filter rather than using a crap one type of thing

    steve
    Steve,

    reality is, and it'll never change:

    once u decide to do color work - may it be "critical" or not, may it be for theater release or for your uncle's iPad - u need to work off a calibrated screen. U cannot make color decision on a non-calibrated screen. Theoretically speaking, if (!) the screen is somewhat in a decent state calibration wise (which u do NOT know) then ur color decisions will be better (as in: more accurate). But in order to know whether ur screen is in a decent state, u need to run a verification profile, and once u do all of that (and have the necessary gear), u can rather just calibrate the damn screen. ;-)

    in order to calibrate the screen - that is: as good as possible, and that iMac screen is not built for that, meaning the hardware itself, the panel, is just no up to par no matter what u do - u need probes (plural, a colorimeter and a spectro) and a good calibration software (LS|Argyll|CM|CP|etc) and then... hopefully find a way to calibrate the display output via a 3D LUT... NOT (!) using .icc profile or Mac color management because that is a major disaster...

    as I said in the first post: ur bare minimum entry is to use a cLUT (a calibration 3D LUT, which some of the major calibration software packages can create from a display profile) inside Resolve as the viewing LUT... and then u will only deal with panel problems such as uniformity issues... understand what that means. The probe reads and therefore calibrates in a center spot on the screen (this is where u will be best calibrated), not in the top left where u will also possibly be making color adjustments.

    if doing this bare minimum setup, u need to work as much as possible full screen in Resolve - avoid "grading" in the little viewer window above the timeline...
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  9. #29  
    Senior Member Steve DiMaggio's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mike Nagel View Post
    Steve,

    reality is, and it'll never change:

    once u decide to do color work - may it be "critical" or not, may it be for theater release or for your uncle's iPad - u need to work off a calibrated screen. U cannot make color decision on a non-calibrated screen. Theoretically speaking, if (!) the screen is somewhat in a decent state calibration wise (which u do NOT know) then ur color decisions will be better (as in: more accurate). But in order to know whether ur screen is in a decent state, u need to run a verification profile, and once u do all of that (and have the necessary gear), u can rather just calibrate the damn screen. ;-)

    in order to calibrate the screen - that is: as good as possible, and that iMac screen is not built for that, meaning the hardware itself, the panel, is just no up to par no matter what u do - u need probes (plural, a colorimeter and a spectro) and a good calibration software (LS|Argyll|CM|CP|etc) and then... hopefully find a way to calibrate the display output via a 3D LUT... NOT (!) using .icc profile or Mac color management because that is a major disaster...

    as I said in the first post: ur bare minimum entry is to use a cLUT (a calibration 3D LUT, which some of the major calibration software packages can create from a display profile) inside Resolve as the viewing LUT... and then u will only deal with panel problems such as uniformity issues... understand what that means. The probe reads and therefore calibrates in a center spot on the screen (this is where u will be best calibrated), not in the top left where u will also possibly be making color adjustments.

    if doing this bare minimum setup, u need to work as much as possible full screen in Resolve - avoid "grading" in the little viewer window above the timeline...
    ok cool, I don't use resolve, tried it, not good for my work flow, I need faster turn around time. I guess since I use RED as a problem solver (raw, temp, ect ect) rather than an artistic tool (color work) I view alot of things differently, I need to move fast on location and not worry about temp ect, which is where raw comes in.

    I had no idea that a calibrating software literally maps to the screen and reads the "geography". Very cool and it makes me understand my a good monitor is needed. Flanders=Earthworks. Thanks again for all the help y'all.

    Thanks to all and I think I understand now

    steve
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  10. #30  
    Senior Member Steve Sherrick's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mike Nagel View Post
    Steve,

    if doing this bare minimum setup, u need to work as much as possible full screen in Resolve - avoid "grading" in the little viewer window above the timeline...
    And therein lies the problem with that particular workflow. I think it's worth doing to have a relatively okay GUI viewer to look at but ultimately you just end up with a bit of a kluge to work with. Better than no calibration but if one can afford it, the calibrated external display is such a more enjoyable experience.
    Steve Sherrick
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