Thread: HyperChargeBattery

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  1. #51  
    Senior Member Satsuki Murashige's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Thai Christen View Post
    Battery shape is just gimick. Best way to shoulder balance is either sliding plate where you can move center of gravitiy of your setup (have not found one that works for me yet), or with rod mount battery plate.
    It appears that the curve of the rear plate matches the curve of the battery, conforming to the shape of the shoulder without need for a sliding battery plate, rods, or shoulder pads. As others have said, this is basically the same comfortable shoulder mount design as an Arri 235, 416, and Moviecam SL with 400' shoulder mags. Hopefully, they have put most of the weight at the rear to help with counterbalance.

    As with any of these film cameras, you'd still want to use a small lightweight prime lens like Ultraprimes or Superspeeds and minimal AKS up front to achieve balance at the shoulder point with this new battery. Once you start putting even lightweight zooms and studio rods on the aforementioned film cameras, a 400' mag with film is not going to be enough counterbalance. So maybe they will make '1000' Mag' batteries next... :)

    However, I have two questions:

    1. Is the v-lock latching mechanism going to be strong enough to withstand the amount of torque that camera operators normally put on film mags without falling off? On sticks, a lot of operators like to grab the back of the mag to pan the camera, and with a battery in the same shape as a film magazine, the temptation will be greater to do this. Also, when operating handheld, mags can get banged around if an operator misjudges a door frame or has to run through a crowd.

    2. How do you fly with such high capacity Li-Ion batteries? Do you guys have some new safety measures built-in to circumvent current TSA regulations?
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  2. #52  
    Senior Member Thai Christen's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Satsuki Murashige View Post
    It appears that the curve of the rear plate matches the curve of the battery, conforming to the shape of the shoulder without need for a sliding battery plate, rods, or shoulder pads. As others have said, this is basically the same comfortable shoulder mount design as an Arri 235, 416, and Moviecam SL with 400' shoulder mags. Hopefully, they have put most of the weight at the rear to help with counterbalance.

    As with any of these film cameras, you'd still want to use a small lightweight prime lens like Ultraprimes or Superspeeds and minimal AKS up front to achieve balance at the shoulder point with this new battery. Once you start putting even lightweight zooms and studio rods on the aforementioned film cameras, a 400' mag with film is not going to be enough counterbalance. So maybe they will make '1000' Mag' batteries next... :)

    However, I have two questions:

    1. Is the v-lock latching mechanism going to be strong enough to withstand the amount of torque that camera operators normally put on film mags without falling off? On sticks, a lot of operators like to grab the back of the mag to pan the camera, and with a battery in the same shape as a film magazine, the temptation will be greater to do this. Also, when operating handheld, mags can get banged around if an operator misjudges a door frame or has to run through a crowd.

    2. How do you fly with such high capacity Li-Ion batteries? Do you guys have some new safety measures built-in to circumvent current TSA regulations?
    That implies that you have to buy the matching plate as well. What if I want to keep my own plate and use battery only? It won't work the way it was designed to, I guess.
    With Dsmc1/2 cameras, center of gravity is beneath the sensor, even with very light lenses. This is where the camera/rig sits on your shoulder for perfect balance. Looking at the picture from Hyperchargebattery, it is further back. Unless they make the end on the battery superheavy I still think the balance is not right. But time will tell once it is in the hand of first users. If you want to stay flexible, I think it is better to go the "old" route with rods and sliding plates.

    Concerning flight regulations, based on my experience as a frequent international traveller, the following:
    According to IATA, spares Lithium/LiPo batteries CANNOT be checked-in. Carry onboard only.
    No matter what technology or cells used, capacity is what matters. And I can assure you, security guards will check the tag on your battery. Don't take your chance. Some of them even know how to calculate the total Wh based on Voltage and Ampere, or Voltage and amount of Cells (if they don't see total Wh capacity on the tag). I was quite surprised.
    So here are the rules as of now. It is very simple.
    > 160Wh, cargo only (in my opinion, too cumbersome unless you have a lot of time ahead to plan for shipping etc.).
    >100Wh and < 160Wh, max. 2 spares
    < 100Wh, as many as you want as long as you keep weight within airline baggage allowance for carry onboard. Usually around 8kg. However, I already managed to take 12kg LiPo batteries on a 3 weeks job around the world with 5 countries and 3 continents. :)
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  4. #54  
    Senior Member Thai Christen's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Brian D. Goff View Post

    I would have loved to see someone operating with that lens combo used in the video on shoulder :)
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  5. #55  
    REDuser Sponsor Brian D. Goff's Avatar
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    I'll try to get something today.
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  6. #56  
    REDuser Sponsor Brian D. Goff's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Andrew Stone View Post
    Projected life span? We know with current battery tech that it is not just the number of cycles but the amount of time in service after manufacture.

    Sizing, are these similar in width and length to the classic Anton Bauers? Think Dionic series. This is key for some cameras and people on Steadicam, as you know.

    Also, flight restrictions. Will these be have air travel restrictions beyond the batteries approved so far?
    -Yes, they have both longer Cycle and Calendar life
    -W X H X D Dionic 90wh 103.0 x 138.7 x 59.4 mm // HyperChargeBattery 85Wh 80x156x71mm
    -Flight restrictions same as all other Batteries
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  7. #57  
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    Brian,

    Not to derail the thread.. I see that the HyperCharge batteries are looking for a summer release. What are we looking at for the BT cages?

    Cheers,
    Simran
    Simran Dewan
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  8. #58  
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    Quote Originally Posted by Brian D. Goff View Post
    All the HyperChargeBatteries are designed round the "Classical" Film Mag look and feel - this is what it is about. The evolution of Film cameras was nearly complete and perfect. Ergonomics were just right. Then came digital cameras, crippled ergonomics and just no "style". HyperChargeBatteries make a camera, well a camera again;-)




    Aaton

    :-)
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