Thread: Lomo 70mm format lenses + other 65mm/70mm format lenses

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  1. #11  
    Senior Member Ilya O.'s Avatar
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    Hi, Timo.

    Good you're here. Nice project, I've heard about it. It's not clear whether you use sales or rental only model?

    Why did you choose Zeiss for Hassy C (T*) lenses? They are rather slow.

    Did you manage to somehow incorporate Biogons 38, 53, 75 in your sets? Or it's impossible due to short clearance?
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  2. #12  
    Quote Originally Posted by Ilya O. View Post
    Hi, Timo.

    Good you're here. Nice project, I've heard about it. It's not clear whether you use sales or rental only model?

    Why did you choose Zeiss for Hassy C (T*) lenses? They are rather slow.

    Did you manage to somehow incorporate Biogons 38, 53, 75 in your sets? Or it's impossible due to short clearance?
    Hi Ilya. We have to think about 38mm to do (Hassy). Basically, Hassy's glasses are not slow, because they have a much larger angle of view than traditional 35mm glasses. The glasses make the peak of the fine Bokeh even though the T value is in the range of 3.5 to 4.0 In addition, the light collecting capability in the glasses is top of the range.

    So and we sell lenses. So if you want, you can buy or rent lenses from us.
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  3. #13  
    Senior Member Ilya O.'s Avatar
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    *[part II of USSR 70mm wide format lenses compendium]*

    OKS2-40-1 has high resolution even at the border, nice microcontrast, very good corner illuminance of 50%, absence of astigmatism, as for distortion, well, it's very reasonable 2% at edge. Datasheet for OKS2-40-1:


    By the way, OKS2-40-1 is an upscaled version of OKS1-18-1 18mm f2.8 T3.2 (35mm format) lens design, compare lens diagrams:

    [OKS1-18-1 Datasheet: Resolution, MTF, Vignetting, aberrations]

    OKS4-40-1 40mm f3.5 T4 lens, diagonal image field 2ω=7114'. This is a lens from the Soviet mainstream 70mm set. Relatively widespread because of production in line at LOMO. Meant to be a replacement for OKS2-40-1 — well, I agree it's more practical to use a smaller and faster OKS4-40-1 lens on set, but strictly speaking OKS2-40-1 is optically superior: just compare every plot of both lenses and you'll see the newer 4-40-1 is a bit worse, besides, the distortion rose to 3-4% at the edge...Do not get me wrong, it is a good lens (it's better than Cooke DuoPanchro 40mm f2.8 T3.2 for instance), it's just a step back optically. Though, lens design is always a compromise of size/price to performance and Prof. D. Volosov, a chief soviet lens designer, the author of both 40mm-s, writes that 4-40-1 is a huge leap forward.
    OKS4-40-1 datasheet:


    Compare 2-40-1 and 4-40-1 lens designs: both use advanced MIR-1 lens design: basic 5-element Gauss lens as a core component and a negative 3-element attachment at front. Prof. D. Volosov writes that pretty high distortion of 3-4%, edge, was intentionally introduced to the OKS4-40-1 so that the awkward unusual border perspective of such a wide lens at such a wide format became less prominent. Well, I do not know, one need to test to understand what he means, but now that seems a very poor excuse making...Tell that to Bertele's Zeiss Biogon 38mm with ~0.3% distortion!

    WOW just missed the last 40mm, the OKS5-40-1. It is one more (on par with OKS2-28-1) USSR Biogon! Though, Distortion is much worse than in Biogon 38mm, it is ~1.6% at image edge, — on the other hand it is considered OK number for cine lenses in USSR (below 2%):
    OKS5-40-1 40mm f4.5 T5.3 lens, diagonal image field 2ω=8229', made to cover square wide format frame of 46.5x52.5mm size, Vario-70 cinema. Again only a CKBK production, small quantities. Datasheet:


    [update] It occurs OKS5-40-1 is not the last 40mm lens! Please welcome:
    OKS8-40-1 f2.0 T2.3 (sic!) lens, 2ω=7114'. It's late 1980-s design, quite complex computer involved design optimization, 11 lenses in 10 groups, multi-coated, was produced in very little quantities at CKBK NPO Ekran, St. Petersburg. So here the simplified datasheet with no charts on resolution, etc, sorry, the empire fall was at the gates:


    OKS1-56-1 56mm f3 T3.4 lens, 2ω=5412'. This lens is widely spread, it's from mainstream set. Tiny lens with impressive overall IQ, mild contrast, very pleasant creamy bokeh and high center sharpness (fall-of is also minimal since the edge is 37 lp/mm). The lens has 7 elements in 4 components Double-Gauss formula, known as Aero-Ektar of George Aklin of Kodak (US Pat.2,343,627 military aerial lens). Prof. D. Volosov, a OKS1-56-1 designer, though, did not use radioactive Thorium and rare earth Lanthanum crown glass (as it was with Aero-Ektar), but employed regular optical glass with no IQ degradation.
    Datasheet of OKS1-56-1:


    OKS2-56-1 56mm f2.5 T~3 lens, 2ω=5412'. This lens was calculated to improve OKS1-56-1 with the faster f-stop and a higher IQ — yet, it has worse egde resolution, namely 26 lp/mm vs 37 lp/mm of 1-56-1. OKS2-56-1 incorporates 5/7 lens design formula, if I'm not mistaken some Leica 50-75mm glass of the mid 1970-shas the same design. Seems it is not widely spread, being replaced by OKS3-56-1 and OKS5-56-1 lenses. Though, it was produced for some little time.
    Datasheet of OKS2-56-1, taken from GOI Lens Catalogue of 1970, part I:


    OKS3-56-1 56mm f3 T3.4 lens, 2ω=5412'. This lens incorporated some new glass types so it was also meant to be an improvement over OKS1-56-1 with the higher overall IQ — well, in some aspects (egde illuminance is shocking 70% vs 45-47% of OKS1-56-1) it is, in others, it's not (edge resolution). Compare the charts. OKS3-56-1 has the same lens design formula of 5/7 as the OKS2-56-1 whilst the details like curvatures and glass are obviously different.
    Seems 3-56-1 is more widespread than OKS2-56-1 since it was at run at LOMO factory, and I have one with the serial number 660474. Yet, the "Prototype" is engraved on mine and I do not know whether it went farther to the large scale prodcution.
    Datasheet of OKS3-56-1 with all the nice nerdy charts:


    Prof. Volosov was not quite happy with both 2-56-1 and 3-56-1 as he was planning (at late 1970-s) to reach more at 56mm with the design which uses extra heavy crown thorium glasses (like in the Aero-Ektar of Kodak). I have no data if that happened or not.

    OKS5-56-1 56mm f2.5 T2.8 lens, 2ω=5412'. Early 1970-s calculation by CKBK (later known as EKRAN), this lens is a final OKS1-56-1 upgrade with the separated last component so the formula is 5/7, see the lens diagram. Beside the speed (I also see 84% transmission which means, for a 5/7 lens, a multicoating applied) they say that way OKS5-56-1 received higher egde resolution, but actually I do not see that at the resolution chart...
    Was in production at LOMO.
    Datasheet of OKS5-56-1:


    And finally the top point of Soviet 56mm:
    OKS7-56-1 56mm f2.0 T2.3 lens, 2ω=5412'. Early 1980-s calculation by CKBK, USSR Patent 1027665, applied 17.02.1982. This lens boasts impressive speed of f2.0, the T-stop is 2.3 due to MC. Advanced and original 6/8 lens design, the patent said the goal was to make a better lens than oks5-56-1, namely to get 1.5x more speed and far better field performance while retaining compactness. The lens is supposed to have high resolution and contrast with almost zero diffusion. On the other hand, edge illuminance is as low as 30%, — there's always a price for speed in Opic / Planar deriviatives. Was in production at CKBK / EKRAN since maybe 1982 (the pic on the Datasheet shows the lens and the number on the barrel is 820001, together with "Prototype" designation). I myslef have one OKS7-56-1, serial is 870003. I found an image of one more 7-56-1 here, it is #870001. That means CKBK had been making maybe a dozen of lenses per year in the 80-s. How many of them survived? Ultra rare no bullshit.
    Datasheet of the speedy OKS7-56-1:

    There's Flickr album of funglaukim full of OKS7-56-1 shots mounted on Sony A7RII (photo full-frame sensor 35,9x24mm):


    ***

    OKS4-75-1 56mm f2.8 T3.2 lens, 2ω=4150'. This lens is widely spread, plenty of them pop up on Ebay. Lomo production. OKS4-75-1 has the same as OKS1-56-1 lens formula of 7 elements in 4 components (Kodak Aero-Ektar). At 75mm this design shows its peak and the lens is very solid performer. See the resolution graph: 4-75-1 has very flat field with almost no fall-off. This lens rocks on portraits having comfortable shooting distance, the smoothest bokeh ever, a bit of spherical aberration, absolute lack of distortion, and a touch of 50% vignette at the edge.
    Datasheet of the OKS4-75-1:

    [OKS4-75-1 charts: Resolution, Vignetting, aberrations]

    Welcome wide format SUPERspeed!
    OKS16-75-1 75mm f1.4 T1.6 lens, 2ω=4149'. It's CKBK made and as rare as OKS7-56-1 56mm f2.0. 7/6 Double-Gauss formula.
    Datasheet of the OKS16-75-1:

    Funglaukim luckily has another 70mm album shot with OKS16-75-1 on Leica S2-P body (3045mm sensor):

    And one more with a girl wide open ehhe e heh h
    Last edited by Ilya O.; 12-26-2017 at 11:47 PM.
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  4. #14  
    Senior Member Ilya O.'s Avatar
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    ***

    OKS2-100-1 100mm f2.8 T3.4 lens, 2ω=3158'. This lens is (relatively) widespread, it's from the mainstream set. Produced at Lenkinap / LOOMP / LOMO in late 50-s and 60-s. Even CKBK produced it in 70-s cause I have one by CKBK #720003). OKS2-100-1 is the max you can get from symmetrical OPIC / Planar 6/4 design — its IQ is superb, take a look at the charts: pretty even field, achromatically corrected, top micro-contrast at center and edge, zero astigmatism and distortion.
    Datasheet of OKS2-100-1 100mm:


    There was one more 100mil, it's superspeed, can you believe?!
    OKS10-100-1 100mm f1.4 T1.6 lens, diagonal image field 2ω=3158'. Hell rare as other late 80-s - early 90-s CKBK EKRAN lenses. I've seen a couple of photos in the net, the serials are always 1 digit like 900009 meaning not more than ten per year were produced;-( Original unusual mod of the OPIC / Planar design — it has 2 elements in front of the first positive doublet (which is huge and thick). High center and edge resolution from the papers.
    Datasheet of OKS10-100-1 100mm:

    Outer look of this giant:


    OKS1-125-1 125mm f2.8 T3.2 lens, 2ω=2548'. This lens occurs here and there, it's from the regular set. Again symmetrical 6/4 design.
    Datasheet of OKS1-125-1 125mm:


    OKS2-150-1 150mm f2.8 T3.2 lens, 2ω=2140'. The last lens in the set, one more bullet-proof Planar. OKS2-150-1 is a king of a hill of distortion control, any Zeiss lens included.
    Datasheet of OKS2-150-1 150mm:


    For longer focal lengths, one can use regular OKS1-200-1 f2.8 and OKS1-300-1 f3.5, they cover 65/70mm just nice.

    Friends, see my previous posts, I've updated the thread with plenty of USSR 70mm glass. Browse up, guys, save fast. Never published before info.

    PLZ join and put any other 6x6 / 65mm / 70mm glass you know here!!!
    Last edited by Ilya O.; 12-26-2017 at 11:43 PM.
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  5. #15  
    Senior Member Ilya O.'s Avatar
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    It's not widely known, but Cooke (Taylor, Taylor & Hobson or just TTH as it's written on the nice lens caps) was also participating in the wide format race back then at 1950 to 1960-s. Yet, as far as I know (and probably I'm mistaken), there were only 5 lenses purposely built for 65/70mm format: 30mm, 40mm, 50mm, 55mm, 75mm — those made in 1950-s were f/2.0, others, like 30mm, 40mm and 55mm from the 1960-s were f/2.8. They are named Double Speed Panchros or, after getting the trademark in the 1962, DuoPanchro lenses. Though, some lens samples taken by NIKFI, Russia, for the testing, are not labeled as DuoPanchros, but have 'Dev.Model' engraved on the front ring, I do not not what that means).

    UPDATE: Here's what Barbara Lowry, the archivist for Cooke Optics Limited, kindly shared about 70mm format Cookes:

    "I have limited information on the Duo Panchro / Double Speed Panchro and am happy to share it with you. Here is the extent of what we know:

    There were a limited number of them made in the 1950s. They are 70mm format. Focal lengths: 40, 50, 75mm, f/2.0, T2.3.

    1.698 back focus.
    All were supplied with bayonet mount.

    Fifteen 55mm f/2.8, T3 were made in 1971.

    The Duo Panchro trademark was issued in 1962.

    There is at least one 30mm f/2.8, T3.

    That's the extent of what any of us know."


    According to Barbara's info, I conclude that any Cooke DuoPancro is hell rare lens, much rarer then any Zeiss or Lomo / CKBK 70mm ones.

    Please guys share any info on Duopanchros! There's lack of it in the net including Cooke's website.

    DuoPanchro 30mm f/2.8 T3.2 lens, 2ω=8722'. This extremely rare and wide Cook lens has one aspherical surface (!), yet I do not know the complete lens diagram. As for aberrations, Cooke made a top lens: no CA, complete lack of astigmatism and shockingly low distortion (below 2%) — this is quite an achievement in optics! Though, that is not the whole story: this lens has insufficient overall IQ. Take a look at the resolution and vignetting graphs: whilst the center resolution is cool is 60 lp/mm, as soon as you move little outwards it drops dramatically and you have poor 10 lp/mm at the edge. Second, relative illumination is also poor: the edge is as dark as 20 and less per cent.
    Datasheet of the DuoPanchro 30mm, taken from NIKFI lens review of 1969:

    [DuoPanchro 30mm charts: Resolution, Vignetting, MTF, aberrations]

    Double Speed Panchro 40mm f/2.0 T2.3 lens. Made in 1950-s. NO info, plz share what you find.

    DuoPanchro 40mm f/2.8 T3.4 lens, 2ω=7114'. As for IQ, the lens was quite ok with good distortion, astigmatism and vignetting control. Though, overall impression is spoiled — as with 30mm — by the drastic resolution fall-off, the lens has mediocre 20lp/mm already at 15mm distance from the center...Besides, CA are not so well controlled, you'll see orange-red outlines. Maybe DuoPanchros were designed for smaller VistaVision frame size, and were not intended to properly perform within the whole 52.5x23mm 65/70mm gate?
    Datasheet of the DuoPanchro 40mm, taken from NIKFI lens review of 1969:

    [DuoPanchro 40mm charts: Resolution, Vignetting, MTF, aberrations]

    Double Speed Panchro 50mm f/2.0 T2.3 lens. Made in 1950-s. NO info, plz share what you find.

    DuoPanchro 55mm f/2.8 T3.1 lens, 2ω=5502'. Finally, a superb wide format Cooke! Pristine and sharp definition from black to white both center and edge, high center resolution and relatively low fall-off with impressive 40lp/mm at the edge. Top astigmatism and distortion control. Though, vignetting could be less (it has ~35% brightness at the edge) and purple-blue fringing around high contrast objects is the price for high sharpness.
    Datasheet of the DuoPanchro 55mm, taken from NIKFI lens review of 1969:

    [DuoPanchro 55mm charts: Resolution, Vignetting, aberrations]

    There's an album of DuoPancro 55mm on Flick, though, it's shot on Sony aps-c sensor:


    Double Speed Panchro 75mm f/2.0 T2.3 lens. Made in 1950-s. NO info, plz share what you find.
    Last edited by Ilya O.; 09-25-2017 at 02:01 PM.
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  6. #16  
    Senior Member Ilya O.'s Avatar
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    What about USSR 70mm wide format zooms? There were!

    Back then at early 1970-s CKBK started with the 70OPF1-1 60-240mm f/3.5. Shifra Shakhnovich was the lens designer (with David Volosov as a chief optical consultant). The design itself was good (for a first bird) yet not optimal due to very short terms given for lens design and manufacturing the first sample.

    70OPF1-1 60-240mm f/3.5 T4.6, 2ω=54-1330'. This 'bird' is actually a huge turkey with impressive 12.1kg (26.68 lbs) weight. Or you can call it an old canon on a carriage:-) Other than that, the resolution is ok for a zoom (at 60mm it has 45 lp/mm center and ~22-25 lp/mm edge). Vignetting and most aberrations are also pretty well under control. What is bad is barrel distortion of ~7% at 60mm, and a pillow one of ~4% at 240mm. Besides, huge and thick glass pieces with only the basic coating lets only 64% of light to pass by, that's why T4.6 at f/3.5.
    Extremely rare, CKBK made. I doubt if there's any survived.
    Datasheet of the 70OPF1-1, taken from NIKFI Lens Review of 1973:

    [70OPF1-1 charts: Resolution, Vignetting, aberrations]

    — I do not have any info on 70OPF2-1 which was probably done since the next zoom is the third model:

    70OPF3-1 40-160mm f/3.5 T4.3, 2ω=7114'-2018'. Year ~1969 CKBK calculation, early samples could be with 72-73 as a first digits of the serial number. Despite the huge front being square (and measuring 265mm / 10.43'') it's not an anamorphic zoom lens. The lens cut was done to decrease the weight (10.3kg or 22.71 lbs). After 1973 this zoom went further from CKBK (which usually do the design and first prototype batch) to LOMO for production, so was the producing factory so expect some rare samples to appear. The resolution curve is quite similar for the wide and tele ends, which is quite a rare in optics if we take zooms. Center resolution is nice (45-50 lp/mm), while the edge is much worse with only 15 lp/mm. Astigmatism is pretty remarkably controlled what we see rare even with modern zooms. As for relative illuminance, it's as high as 60% at edge at 40mm — 40mm LOMO / Zeiss / Cooke primes are ~10-20% worse! Again, huge glass pieces eat 33% of light so T4.3 at f/3.5.
    Datasheet of the 70OPF3-1, taken from NIKFI Lens Review of 1973:

    [70OPF3-1 charts: Resolution, Vignetting, aberrations]

    70OPF4-1 50-106mm f/3.5 T5.2, 2ω=5938'-3015'. Year ~1970 CKBK calculation and prototyping, after 1973 was made by LOMO in some little quantities. This 2x zoom was designed for hand-held work, it weighs only 1.67kg or 3.68 lbs. As for 50mm, the IQ is more or less acceptable (yet the barrel distortion is way too high ~6% at edge), while at 'tele' end of 106mm this zoom is, well, pretty poor performer since the quality drops down quick and at the edge you have: resolution is 10 lp/mm, 30% brightness, ~7% pillow distortion.
    Datasheet of the 70OPF4-1, taken from NIKFI Lens Review of 1973:

    [70OPF4-1 charts: Resolution, Vignetting, aberrations]

    70OPF5-1 40-240mm f/4.5-5.6 T4.4, 2ω=7114'-1330'. USSR Pat. 455309, applied 10th of Apr. 1973 by I. Neginskaya, E. Teryaeva, S. Shakhnovich of CKBK:


    At wide end, 40mm, this 6x zoom has pretty good IQ: 55 lp/mm center and 25 lp/mm edge resolution, impressive 70% edge illuminance, all main aberrations are well controlled, including CA control which is quite close to APO level (three basic colors focus at the same plane). Though, there's no elements for lateral color correction, notice orange-blue vertical outlines on the contrast objects which rise the more you go towards the edge (left click - new tab for 6.5k):


    [70OPF5-1 test shot at 40mm f/4.5 6.5K, image size ~55x15.6mm]

    The NIKFI plot says there's 6-7% of barrel Distortion at the edge, and that level I considered severe before, but now I see it's not so (yet, the test shot is not 23mm tall but only 15.6mm). Subjectively, it's okay number, just see the upper shot.

    An extreme tele end of 240mm is not the best spot of 70OPF5-1 since I think the basic calculation was optimized for the wide and normal angles. The zoom shows mediocre resolution, vignetting, CA, and a pillow distortion. See the test shot:


    [70OPF5-1 test shot at 240mm f/5.6, 6.5K, image size ~55x15.6mm]

    Still, the upper shot seems not as bad actually as it goes from the aberrations description.

    This 6x zoom closes the aperture when zooming (so it reaches f/5.6 at 240mm) to rise IQ, see the 3rd component, it is hard connected to the iris gearing. I think the first prototype was done as early as at 1974 by CKBK, #740001:


    — and it is for sale here on RedUser. More images here (optical bench tests, chart 14K tests): http://goo.gl/CGM4pc

    Finally, the Datasheet of the 70OPF5-1, taken from NIKFI Lens Review of 1978:

    [70OPF5-1 charts: Resolution, Vignetting, Image Shift, Spectral transmission, aberrations]

    70OPF7-1 50-100mm f/3.5 T4, 2ω=4747'-3019'. Late 70s - early 1980s CKBK calculation, was in production at CKBK / EKRAN in the 1980-s with the serial numbers like 810001 or 840001 (real ones) — that means no more than dozen or less per year were made. RARE. The zoom is 2x and weighs only 1.2kg (2.65lbs) so it was made for handheld work as a replacement for 70OPF4-1. Multi-coating applied, so high light transmission and impressive (for a 15-element zoom lens) T4 at f/3.5. Yet, gives warm picture due to poor indigo/blue transmission. Center resolution is as high as 60 lp/mm, while the edge is not so with 20-15 lp/mm. Relative illuminance at the edge is also not top, only 30-25% so consider that as an effect giving more dimension:-).
    Reduced Datasheet of the 70OPF7-1, taken from NIKFI Lens Review of 1989:



    The last and latest USSR zoom for 70mm was big and complex 20-element lens
    70OPF9-1 45-200mm f/3.5 T4, 2ω=5122'-1543'. Mid 1980-s (?) calculation and production of CKBK / EKRAN. Later, at 1990-s, known as Vario-Optar 3.5/45-200mm zoom lens made by JSC Optika (it became JSC Optica Elite a bit later) — the successor of CKBK.
    Reduced Datasheet of the 70OPF9-1 | Vario-Optar 3.5/45-200, taken from NIKFI Lens Review of 1989, notice the 2-iris design and very complex front groups:
    Last edited by Ilya O.; 09-21-2017 at 02:04 PM.
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  7. #17  
    Senior Member Ilya O.'s Avatar
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    updated the thread with late zooms, enjoy
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  8. #18  
    Senior Member Ilya O.'s Avatar
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    Here's what Barbara Lowry, the archivist for Cooke Optics Limited, kindly wrote me about 70mm format Cookes:

    "I have limited information on the Duo Panchro / Double Speed Panchro and am happy to share it with you. Here is the extent of what we know:

    There were a limited number of them made in the 1950s.

    They are 70mm format. Focal lengths: 40, 50, 75mm, f/2.0, T2.3.
    1.698 back focus.
    All were supplied with bayonet mount.

    Fifteen 55mm f/2.8, T3 were made in 1971.

    The Duo Panchro trademark was issued in 1962.

    There is at least one 30mm f/2.8, T3.

    That's the extent of what any of us know."
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  9. #19  
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    This is amazing Ilya. Our Tech said He have to contact You. Thanks for that !
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  10. #20  
    Senior Member Ilya O.'s Avatar
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    :-) welcome
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