Thread: Steadi Cam Advice

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  1. #11  
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    I am not sure it would do you much good to get a low rent rig. Probably learn bad habits and bad techniques. Then again, it would get you in the mind set of designing complicated steadicam shots. The offer of the Raptor for $5k is a hell of a deal. If I were you I would beg borrow and steal to snap that up. Pay pal credit, credit card, whatever. Failing that, keep your eyes peeled for deals on ebay. if you come across a steadicam EFP, or an old GPI rig, something like that will fit the bill and not break the bank, but it's still going to be a lot more than $5k. The place to spend money is on the gimbal and the arm. Cheep (and even not so cheep) topstages can have vibration issues. A basic post with a battery solution and a monitor bracket should be able to be found second hand.

    If you want to fly light cameras, you might consider a used pilot. It's in your price range, it's a real steadicam, and I've used it with a c-300. It's not awful.
    https://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/used/...SABEgK9dfD_BwE

    If you have any specific questions feel free to ask. I've been flying steadicam for .......fuck me...more than 20 years. I'm getting too old for this shit.....

    Oh, also poke around on the for sale section of the steadicam forum.
    Nick
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  2. #12  
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nick Gardner View Post
    I am not sure it would do you much good to get a low rent rig. Probably learn bad habits and bad techniques. Then again, it would get you in the mind set of designing complicated steadicam shots. The offer of the Raptor for $5k is a hell of a deal. If I were you I would beg borrow and steal to snap that up. Pay pal credit, credit card, whatever. Failing that, keep your eyes peeled for deals on ebay. if you come across a steadicam EFP, or an old GPI rig, something like that will fit the bill and not break the bank, but it's still going to be a lot more than $5k. The place to spend money is on the gimbal and the arm. Cheep (and even not so cheep) topstages can have vibration issues. A basic post with a battery solution and a monitor bracket should be able to be found second hand.

    If you want to fly light cameras, you might consider a used pilot. It's in your price range, it's a real steadicam, and I've used it with a c-300. It's not awful.
    https://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/used/...SABEgK9dfD_BwE

    If you have any specific questions feel free to ask. I've been flying steadicam for .......fuck me...more than 20 years. I'm getting too old for this shit.....

    Oh, also poke around on the for sale section of the steadicam forum.
    Nick
    Do you think this pilot is durable enough for the scarlet W with a cine lens, or atleast a regular lens 24-70
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  3. #13  
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    It's rated at 10 lbs camera weight I believe. So theoretically you could fly that.

    Nick
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  4. #14  
    Senior Member Marc Dunham's Avatar
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    I know people hate on the chinese brands but I used this kit for a year or two with my Epic DSMC1 before finally upgrading to a Steadicam Zephyr and its worth a look into. I would never sell myself as a steadicam op or actually charged for it really with this kit but it actually worked very well to teach me some basics of steadicam (I used glidecam before this as well) and I got a lot of use out of it in extreme conditions, shooting music festivals and similar sorts, so it holds up. I was able to fly a dragon with zeiss super speeds, dji follow focus and paralinx wireless transmitter without an issue.

    That being said it definitely ran into issues when I started pushing the weight too much, the arm would be considered garbage when compared to a steadicam brand arm.

    https://www.came-tv.com/collections/...bon-stabilizer

    If you're serious about steadicam oping vs just as a tool for your personal stuff then it's only going to be a bandaid till you save money to step up, but I'd say it was worth the $900 still.
    Marc Dunham
    EPIC DRAGON # 5370
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  5. #15  
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    thankyou for the feedback
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  6. #16  
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    thank you any ways David, I'm sure its a great deal, I just currently have a list of other things I'm buying.
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  7. #17  
    Senior Member Hugh Scully's Avatar
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    Keep an eye out for an older Steadicam Flyer LE. It’ll fly 19 lbs. I bought one used close to your price range. However, I had to rewire the sled for sdi video and power. It works great. It is an elegant way to move the camera and it takes a lot of practice but there’s nothing like it.
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  8. #18  
    Senior Member constantine Tirintzis's Avatar
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    Here is something that works reasonably well and you will be able to re sell afterwords if you decide upgrading.
    Its very close to your price range. https://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/produ...er_system.html
    close to your cam range as well.

    Also what Hugh Scully said. There are many rigs going around second hand those days. Shop around.You kight get lucky.

    cheers
    Constantine Tirintzis
    Steadicam,Robotics,design & engineering
    constantine@flowcine.com
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  9. #19  
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    For that price get a Glide Cam David Graham edition and the x10 arm and vest. Power it with redvolt xl or red mini v’s. I have this setup and it works. Dont expect to use lenses heavier than the 11-24 4 or the Otus 28. These are at the absolute weight limit. I use the old 5” on top with my weapon on this configuration. Its really, really on the limit but works well.

    I also have the original Ronin with Tilta’s Armor Man 2. It does work but for 90% of the shots- follow subject, hero turns, etc, the steadicam, if one knows what he’s doing, is better. Gymbals require much more time and personnel to make it work.
    Sérgio Perez

    Weapon Monstro #03294 "Amochai" in Macau

    Video Director/Creative/Producer


    http://vimeo.com/user1503556

    https://www.youtube.com/user/spzprod..._as=subscriber
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  10. #20  
    Senior Member Paul Kalbach's Avatar
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    Like Constantine, I highly recommend taking a workshop. I started flying Steadicam in 1991 by picking it up on my own. After about a year of operating, I took a Steadicam certification workshop, and discovered that I had developed some very BAD habits. It’s very important to learn how to operate correctly from the beginning. I would also recommend looking around for a used older rig with enough weight capacity overhead that you can grow into… There’s nothing like the original!
    Paul Kalbach

    RED Weapon-Helium#4580, RedOne-MX #1693, RedOne-MX #10062

    www.ArtichokePro.com
    www.RedZephyrCam.com
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