Thread: RED Scarlet-MX w/ 85c/80c filters when filming on bluescreen

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  1. #1 RED Scarlet-MX w/ 85c/80c filters when filming on bluescreen 
    I’ve been reading up on REDUser for the past few weeks about lens filtration on RED cameras when filming on greenscreen. Usually the scenario involves either boosting the color on the screen with green Kino bulbs/gelling the lights, or screwing an 80c filter on the lens to balance out the color and adjust white balance.

    Due to the fact that my shoot involves bluescreen, would the opposite be true, in screwing an 85c (the reverse color the 80c)?

    I know the 80C filter corrects 3800K to 5500K and that the the 85C filter corrects 5500K to 3800K.

    I'm also wondering if anyone has example stills or footage of filming in log on the RED Scarlet-MX in front of bluescreen that I could possibly see to reference my upcoming filming scenario.

    Thanks,
    Charlie Knott
    MICA Film and Video, ‘19
    cknott@mica.edu
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  2. #2  
    Senior Member Tommaso Alvisi's Avatar
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    Charlie, on the MX use an 80C or at least an 80D in this situation, given you have the spare light to compensate for the global light loss.

    This way the blue channel will be more balanced once you raise the global exposure.

    This is of course valid if mainly using Tungsten light.

    If you use HMIs you would not need to use the cooling filter since the fuller spectrum of the lights (and their cooler color temp) will fill the blue channel appropriately.

    Hope it helps!
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  3. #3  
    Senior Member Nick Morrison's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tommaso Alvisi View Post
    Charlie, on the MX use an 80C or at least an 80D in this situation, given you have the spare light to compensate for the global light loss.

    This way the blue channel will be more balanced once you raise the global exposure.

    This is of course valid if mainly using Tungsten light.

    If you use HMIs you would not need to use the cooling filter since the fuller spectrum of the lights (and their cooler color temp) will fill the blue channel appropriately.

    Hope it helps!
    What Tommaso said.

    Let me add a great way to get good exposure on green screen is to drop your ISO - shoot at 320/400, just watch your highlights.
    Nick Morrison
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  4. #4  
    Tommaso and Nick,

    What if I'm utilizing both tungsten and HMI lighting in my shot? (I'm putting a 10ft x___ft bluescreen outside my house's windows and I want to maintain a strong sense of tungsten light indoors while outdoors keeping a strong blue.) I'm assuming doing this will create contrasting lighting and better separate my subject (the house, windowframes and the actors) from the bluescreen. I'm just curious if I'm correct in setting up the tungsten kits indoors and the HMI's outdoors.

    Thanks for your feedback so far,
    Charlie
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