Thread: Best headphones for in field audio monitoring

Reply to Thread
Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12
Results 11 to 14 of 14
  1. #11  
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    Hollywood, USA
    Posts
    6,320
    I used the Sony 7506's for years (and by that I mean like 20+ years), but the later replacement, the MDR-7510, is actually more accurate, less "peaky," and if I didn't know any better, more comfortable. One reason Sony did it was because they genuinely felt it was an improvement; another is because a lot of cheap 7506 clones showed up on eBay, and they wanted to discourage people from buying them (though I think the 7506's are still in the line).

    Note the 7510's do not fold up and the 7506's do, so there is that.
    marc wielage, csi colorist/post consultant daVinci Resolve Certified Trainer
    Reply With Quote  
     

  2. #12  
    The 7506's have always seemed to be the "de facto" headphones, but I went with the 7509's, partly because I liked the design better. They discontinued them and the replacements do not fold up, so that eliminated them for bag use. One of my audio guys turned me onto Ultrasone headphones many years ago and I bought a pair(PRO 900) and really liked them. So I have two (old) pair of Sony 7509's and two pair of Ultrasone PRO 900's.

    I don't think I saw anyone mention it, but a lot of guys like using IEM's(in ear monitors). Advantages: small, light, and great sound isolation which really helps in loud environments.
    Reply With Quote  
     

  3. #13  
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    Hollywood, USA
    Posts
    6,320
    Quote Originally Posted by Christopher A. Bell View Post
    I don't think I saw anyone mention it, but a lot of guys like using IEM's(in ear monitors). Advantages: small, light, and great sound isolation which really helps in loud environments.
    Two problems with in-ear monitors:

    1) you can't hear anything very close to you, so if somebody needs to talk to you or otherwise warn you about an issue, you've gotta yank the earphone out to hear them

    2) the cables on all the IEM's I've used have picked up a lot of microphonics if the cable moves when I work, so I inevitably hear a lot of "clunks and ticks" I have to ignore.

    Full-size headphones don't have these problems to any great degree.
    marc wielage, csi colorist/post consultant daVinci Resolve Certified Trainer
    Reply With Quote  
     

  4. #14  
    I was an audio engineer for many years and the Sony 7506 phones are the industry standard - for decades.
    The best sounding or for mixing? Probably not - yet because a ton of people are familiar with them,
    they sort of serve as a Rosetta Stone. At $100 or so, they are pretty robust. I have a couple of pairs over 20 years old and they still work after thousands of events.

    Also, you can have great audio monitors to mix on, but I always still want to take the mixes to my car and several other listening environments so that I know what other consumers will be hearing.

    YMMV :-)
    Reply With Quote  
     

Posting Permissions
  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts