Thread: Rode Wireless go anyone?

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  1. #11  
    The useable spectrum is rapidly becoming more and more crowded and also "disappearing", because of the FCC auctioning it off, but to be clear you do not have to be licensed to use Lectro wireless'(well, I'm getting mixed info on the new 941 block).
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  2. #12  
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tim Morten View Post
    Marc, you called the Rode system "cheap and crappy". Zaxcom and Lectro are great, but they are orders of magnitude more expensive and use licensed spectrum that is rapidly being lost, filling up, and doesn't stay consistently usable internationally.
    One answer is to rent the gear when you need it, and you can afford the very best Zaxcom or Lectrosonics wireless out there. That's assuming you're in an area that supports pro audio dealers. If the area doesn't have any good nearby dealers (or mixers who will rent you their gear), start saving your money. A couple of used Lectro wireless systems is not that expensive and can still work well, provided you pick a frequency band that works for you. My pick today would be blocks 19 and 20, and those have actually been around for quite a few years now.
    marc wielage, csi colorist/post consultant daVinci Resolve Certified Trainer
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  3. #13  
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    https://www.newsshooter.com/2019/04/...ess-go-review/

    Hmm seems super practical(like leave it your backpack at all times, like during a hike) on the other hand if the audio quality is not that great then I better buy a sony udw-p set.
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  4. #14  
    Senior Member Tim Morten's Avatar
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    I'd be curious to try it with a proper professional lav microphone rather than the Rode mid-tier that he used.
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  5. #15  
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    so essentially could you have to sets, then have a spliter that chains the two receivers into one output to camera? i guess each mic might be on separate channels, L and R.
    which would also be good.
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  6. #16  
    Senior Member Tim Morten's Avatar
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    There's a cable to split the 3.5mm audio input on the camera to left and right. You could have two receivers, one into each channel, with that cable. There's a WC cold shoe mount that you could use to mount them.
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  7. #17  
    There are two discussions going on here: a) how is the Rode system, and b) what's worth owning?

    a) I can't comment on the quality of the Rode system-- would also be curious about how it sounds with a better mic. My concerns would be the rechargeable batteries (you just know that the battery will die in the middle of a shoot!) and that it appears there's not locking mechanism for the 3.5mm input, meaning a lav can easily shake loose from the tiny unit.

    b) Speaking more broadly to an approach to owning sound stuff: if you're a sound person, I'd say that you shouldn't buy this as your main kit! Follow Marc's advice and rent better stuff while you save up. Same if you mostly want to do feature or other high end work, I'd think. But if you're a producer/shooter on the kind of low-budget corporate/educational shoots (for internal use or youtube) that I often do, decide if it's "good enough" for tier 1.

    Tier 1: One man band, maybe one assistant. Flat rate for equipment, so more spent on rentals means no assistant or less pay. For these jobs, I bought a Sony wireless kit-- two transmitters (Sony UTX-B03) and a dual receiver (Sony URX-P03D). The sound quality is on par with Sennheiser G3/G4 with stock mics-- good enough, but not great. And it's reliable, with interchangeable AA batteries and locking mic cables. (Also goes into a Sony FS- or A-series camera cableless via the hot shoe-- huge convenience if you're shooting with one of these cameras.)
    Tier 2: Step up production where I get a sound person. They typically bring their own quality kit (Lectro, Zaxcom, etc.). But even if they're using something less expensive, they are able to use their skills to get better performance from the same equipment (improved rigging of mic, more attention to monitoring, etc.) Zaxcom transmitters don't sound much better than the Sonys, if they're constantly rubbing against fabric. So if more money is being spent on sound, I'd rather spend it on a skilled crew member.

    I decided it made sense to own something "good enough" for tier 1-- available on a moment's notice, pays itself off quickly, reliable--, and to leave tier 2 to a dedicated sound person. For me, I can't make a good personal case for buying Lectro.

    All that said: I use a decent wired Countryman B3 lav when I can in order to avoid fussing with wireless at all. And I usually-- but not always-- have a quality boom mic (Schoeps mk41 or Sennheiser 416) as well.
    Last edited by M Harvey; 04-22-2019 at 11:01 AM.
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  8. #18  
    Senior Member Tim Morten's Avatar
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    Rode can be powered via USB if the battery life is a concern (but the onboard batteries are at least anecdotally sufficient).

    For those with higher budgets, no question that Zaxcom and Lectro are superior. These are definitely a budget choice, but possibly a good one.
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  9. #19  
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    Without even listening to them I already know they're inappropriate:

    Limited battery life.

    No locking connector.


    The price isn't even that great, once you factor in the cost of a half decent lav then you're looking at a very similar ish price per channel as the new Deity Connect Wireless or a secondhand Sony UWP-D3 / Senny G3
    http://IronFilm.co.nz/Sound/ (Sound Recordist based in Auckland, NZ. Happy to travel too)
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  10. #20  
    Senior Member Tim Morten's Avatar
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    Deity Connect has unacceptably high latency. Lack of locking connector is definitely unfortunate. Battery is easy to solve with external power, if battery life actually turns out to be an issue. Second hand Sony or Senn are decent choices. I really like the size and ease of use of the Rode system. Planning to pick up two with separate lavs.
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