Thread: Gemini not capturing blacks. Help.

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  1. #31  
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jason beaumont View Post
    Nah , give me a fish feed me for a day, teach me to fish, and feed me for a lifetime. Besides this was just a small passion project. It was just me and a friend and another friend holding my boom. For lighting we had 1 sky panel, and a arri 650 lol. Its not enough for a man to climb mount Everest. He has to do it with the least amount of tools possible! Nah but really, I just wanted to see how well I could bring my little script to life with limited resources.


    My friend who I was shooting with didn't understand low light mode. He felt like because we had lights we shouldn't use it, which I told him is not the case, but for the sake of not wasting time arguing, and since he was operating I let him have his way (never again lol). 4k WS was because my Cooke s4i mini vignette at 5k on the gemini. atleast one of them does. I don't know, I hardly ever shoot lenses wide open. I am def using my tools more often thanks.
    I hear ya; it's a dilemma when you don't quiet know for sure (and definitely gives you a real-world fishing lesson). And yeah, you'll be aces moving forward.

    Makes sense (re: s4i/coverage)... a shame cause they usually cover when in WS.
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  2. #32  
    Quote Originally Posted by Les Hillis View Post
    Imo those two underexposed shots are unuseable because they don't intercut with the rest of the scene/footage, but you could still shoot that dark (like in Hrvoje's grades) if the surrounding shots matched and if the individual shots didn't need to convey more information to the audience than what they still manage to do.
    Those are not grades. :)

    Those are transformations showing accurate exposure for that sensor for a thick negative and healthy shadows. Which is especially important when exposing to dark scenes.

    If the surrounding shots matched those uderexposed two, they would also be unusable. Gemini is capable of outstanding imagery but as with every camera, that necessitates proper exposure. Unrealistic image preview propagates overly optimistic expectations which lead to improper one.
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  3. #33  
    In theory he was right, if you have enough lights, you don’t need to use high ISOs, especially for a scene that is supposed to be dark. After all, they were doing moody night scenes in movies back when film stocks were incredibly slow.

    One tip: if you are shooting in a very dimly-lit room at high ISO’s, don’t judge the exposure by the monitor because the monitor becomes the brightest object in the room, it’s like looking into a lit lampshade. You will tend to underexpose too much to make the monitor image feel dark enough.
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  4. #34  
    Senior Member David J. Buchanan's Avatar
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    Yeah, I think everyone touched on the problem. it's the lighting, not the camera.

    It could be useful to shoot some tests with it before dropping rental dollars on a sky panel... unless you own it.
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  5. #35  
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    Quote Originally Posted by David Mullen ASC View Post
    In theory he was right, if you have enough lights, you donít need to use high ISOs, especially for a scene that is supposed to be dark. After all, they were doing moody night scenes in movies back when film stocks were incredibly slow.

    One tip: if you are shooting in a very dimly-lit room at high ISOís, donít judge the exposure by the monitor because the monitor becomes the brightest object in the room, itís like looking into a lit lampshade. You will tend to underexpose too much to make the monitor image feel dark enough.
    Thank you!

    Quote Originally Posted by David J. Buchanan View Post
    Yeah, I think everyone touched on the problem. it's the lighting, not the camera.

    It could be useful to shoot some tests with it before dropping rental dollars on a sky panel... unless you own it.
    Own it. yeah I still think the came jumps in noise really easy in standard mode, but atleast I understand it, so I can avoid (or not avoid it) , as I choose. thank you everyone
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