Thread: Gemini not capturing blacks. Help.

Reply to Thread
Page 1 of 4 1234 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 35
  1. #1 Gemini not capturing blacks. Help. 
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2013
    Location
    Miami
    Posts
    323
    Now I know what your going to say, yes I black shaded. I was in a dimly lit room and the Gemini would not capture any information in the shadows correctly, or the highlights. it didn't just look like I was shooting in a dark room, the picture itself is completely unusable, and the shadows look distorted. The room was not pitch black though, there was light.
    I had to add a bunch of light to the scene. Can someone tell me what I did wrong, or has this happened to them. My camera just started doing this. There is quite a bit of noise in the picture. Then there were other scenes we did that didn't come out as bad, but anything that required it to be dark the camera completely crashed in quality, could not get any blacks. Even when I lowered the iso the highlights started coming out weird. Maybe im just exposing these scenes the wrong way, but I feel like something is wrong with the camera, in the same situation my scarlet W wouldn't have looked like this. The day before when we were in bright lighting conditions, everything looked great (last picture).

    Last edited by Jason beaumont; 07-13-2019 at 06:59 AM.
    Reply With Quote  
     

  2. #2  
    Post a link to a frame of the R3D in question.
    Michael Tiemann, Chapel Hill NC

    "Dream so big you can share!"
    Reply With Quote  
     

  3. #3  
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2013
    Location
    Miami
    Posts
    323
    https://www.dropbox.com/sh/tgww3rp00...HdGar305a?dl=0

    I know your going to look at the histogram and say, this was super under exposed, but I guess what im saying is the room had plenty of light, it shouldnt have came in so dark.
    Reply With Quote  
     

  4. #4  
    Senior Member Chris McKechnie's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Dallas, TX
    Posts
    5,129
    Your shots are severely underexposed, but make sure you have 2 black shading calibrations - one for Low Light Mode, and the other for Standard. I'm guessing, you were using your black shade from the standard calibration as opposed to LL, which will drastically reduce exposure.
    Chris McKechnie
    Director of Photography
    Email - redepicguy@gmail.com
    Reel - https://vimeo.com/314919326
    Reply With Quote  
     

  5. #5  
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Posts
    1,193
    Looking at the Metadata -

    Shot # A001_C001_07128C.0000704F

    Resolution 5120x2170
    Record Frame Rate 23.976
    Shutter (ms) 10
    Shutter (1/sec) 96
    Shutter (deg) 90
    ISO 800
    Aperture F4.4
    Sensor Sensitivity Name - Standard
    REDCODE - REDcode 8:1


    Shot # A001_C012_0712C4.0000253F

    Resolution 4096x1728
    Record Frame Rate 23.976
    Shutter (ms) 21
    Shutter (1/sec) 48
    Shutter (deg) 180
    ISO 1600
    Aperture F3.5
    Sensor Sensitivity Name - Low-light
    REDCODE - REDcode 2:1


    The differences in those settings could explain why the first shot looks darker.
    Reply With Quote  
     

  6. #6  
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2013
    Location
    Miami
    Posts
    323
    I felt like everything I was doing was under exposed then, because it only looked decent when I added a bunch of light. otherwise the blacks and highlights looked super weird. So how do you expose for a night shot and keep it dark? In this shot the actor was breaking into the house at night time.
    Last edited by Jason beaumont; 07-13-2019 at 11:02 AM.
    Reply With Quote  
     

  7. #7  
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2013
    Location
    Miami
    Posts
    323
    Quote Originally Posted by Les Hillis View Post
    Looking at the Metadata -

    Shot # A001_C001_07128C.0000704F

    Resolution 5120x2170
    Record Frame Rate 23.976
    Shutter (ms) 10
    Shutter (1/sec) 96
    Shutter (deg) 90
    ISO 800
    Aperture F4.4
    Sensor Sensitivity Name - Standard
    REDCODE - REDcode 8:1


    Shot # A001_C012_0712C4.0000253F

    Resolution 4096x1728
    Record Frame Rate 23.976
    Shutter (ms) 21
    Shutter (1/sec) 48
    Shutter (deg) 180
    ISO 1600
    Aperture F3.5
    Sensor Sensitivity Name - Low-light
    REDCODE - REDcode 2:1


    The differences in those settings could explain why the first shot looks darker.
    I know I changed the settings between the 2 shots, I guess what im saying is that the room had a good amount of light and it was showing up dark like this, but not just dark, completely under exposed which make all the highlights and shadow funky. I just feel like in that same situation my Scarlet W wouldn't have clipped light that, that first shot is completely unusable.
    Reply With Quote  
     

  8. #8  
    Quote Originally Posted by Jason beaumont View Post
    I felt like everything I was doing was under exposed then, because it only looked decent when I added a bunch of light. otherwise the blacks and highlights looked super weird. So how do you expose for a night shot and keep it dark? In this shot the actor was breaking into the house at night time.
    Here's a posting to get you started: http://www.reduser.net/forum/showthr...=1#post1847815

    You can read the whole thread, or just the one posting.
    Michael Tiemann, Chapel Hill NC

    "Dream so big you can share!"
    Reply With Quote  
     

  9. #9  
    Quote Originally Posted by Jason beaumont View Post
    https://www.dropbox.com/sh/tgww3rp00...HdGar305a?dl=0

    I know your going to look at the histogram and say, this was super under exposed, but I guess what im saying is the room had plenty of light, it shouldnt have came in so dark.
    Assuming there were no lighting changes at all between these two images, the differences I see are Standard vs. LL (2 stops), f4.4 vs f3.2 (1 stop), and 90 degree shutter vs. 180 degree shutter (1 stop), for a total of 4 stops under. Given that the second image is about 3 stops underexposed, the additional four stops of exposure reduction leads to the conclusion that your shot is 7 stops underexposed. If there was a change in lighting, then you might be even worse off than that.
    Michael Tiemann, Chapel Hill NC

    "Dream so big you can share!"
    Reply With Quote  
     

  10. #10  
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    Hollywood, USA
    Posts
    6,347
    Quote Originally Posted by Jason beaumont View Post
    I felt like everything I was doing was under exposed then, because it only looked decent when I added a bunch of light. otherwise the blacks and highlights looked super weird. So how do you expose for a night shot and keep it dark? In this shot the actor was breaking into the house at night time.
    It's possible to crush the overall image in post to create a "night feel" to the image, but a lot depends on keeping the light spill off the background and having pockets of light for the actors to walk through in the room so that it's not pitch black. Great reference books like David Mullen's Cinematography and the American Society of Cinematographer Handbook go into detail about key-to-fill ratio and how to create a night look on set.

    https://www.amazon.com/Cinematograph.../dp/074326438X

    https://www.amazon.com/American-Cine.../dp/1467568317

    The best thing I can tell you is to always shoot tests before situations like this and experiment as far as how far you can go in terms of exposure and fill. My standard line in final color is "darker is easy... brighter is hard," particularly when it comes to adjusting exposure in post. Many, many shows that lean heavily on night scenes, like Walking Dead and Stranger Things, have gone with what I call a "stylized night look," where everything important is still fairly visible, but there are pockets of darkness and light here and there that help sell the idea that it's night and it's believable. Where this can get dodgy is when you cross the line into muddiness, and then you wind up with noise and viewers straining to see images that carry the story. (The recent complaints on Game of Thrones fall into that area.)
    marc wielage, csi • colorist/post consultant • daVinci Resolve Certified Trainer
    Reply With Quote  
     

Posting Permissions
  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts