Thread: Order of REC709 LUT placement in Resolve node chain?

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  1. #1 Order of REC709 LUT placement in Resolve node chain? 
    Hello everyone,

    First time posting and owning a RED camera(Gemini). Just wanted to say this community is great and I have learned a lot from reading articles on this forum.

    I have a question about the order of LUT placement in the Resolve node chain. I have some LUT's that are in REC709. From reading posts it seems creative LUT's should be placed before the RED transform LUT. I've been testing both before and after the RED transform LUT. I feel that the REC709 LUT works best after the RED transform LUT? I do not own any IPP2 LUTs, perhaps they would work best before the RED transform LUT.

    I included two pictures of my normal workflow. Please let know if anything looks out of place.


    Thanks,

    -Patrick Beck
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  2. #2  
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    It's also possible to just color-correct and not use a LUT at all. We typically use IPP2, RWG-RGB, and Log3G10 color science for Red shows in the project settings, and then we do the rest with curves and normal controls within Resolve. We basically "treat it like film" and go for there. We have some settings that get very close to the stock Rec709 LUT, except they're not destructive.

    It's fair to say there's multiple methods that can work, and some productions use Show LUTs to keep the look consistent between departments (particularly Editorial, Dailies, VFX, and Color). There are pros and cons for each, but it boils down to whatever works with the time available, and if it gets the creative look the director and DP want.
    marc wielage, csi colorist/post consultant daVinci Resolve Certified Trainer
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  3. #3  
    Senior Member Aaron Lochert's Avatar
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    LUTs are always expecting a certain input. If your LUTs are designed for a Rec709 gamma/space then you should put it after the IPP2 Transform.

    However, the beauty of IPP2 is it allows LUT creators to make LUTs that work on the wide gammut material (or better, just grade in this space as Marc suggests)

    You can also just get RED footage to Rec709 with Resolves Color Space Transform OFX plugin. Better than using the LUT based approach.
    Last edited by Aaron Lochert; 09-28-2019 at 06:07 AM.
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  4. #4  
    Cool thanks for the info guys! I am just an amateur colorist at best. Definitely would be better to create my own LUT before the transform node to take advantage of REDwidegamut. All I have are some REC709 LUTs to get a starting point that I like. Good to know I was placing them in the correct order:)
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  5. #5  
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    Quote Originally Posted by Patrick Beck View Post
    Cool thanks for the info guys! I am just an amateur colorist at best. Definitely would be better to create my own LUT before the transform node to take advantage of REDwidegamut. All I have are some REC709 LUTs to get a starting point that I like. Good to know I was placing them in the correct order:)
    If you're just trying to get it to Rec709, shoot a DSC Chart (like the Chroma DuMonde) and look at where the levels wind up. Once adjusted, the color values should hit the targets on a Vectroscope, pure white should be 100 on the waveform, pure black should be 0, and everything should be fairly well-balanced. That's assuming correct exposure, color temperature, and balanced lighting.





    Without charts and scopes, there's a lot of guesswork involved. We can and have color-corrected without charts, but I'd rather have them whenever possible, all things equal.

    Of course, once you get an "accurate" picture out of the camera, then it's a creative choice to steer the image in a specific direction. You could make it all desaturated and green/cyan like Chernobyl, or vivid and soft like a modern Revlon commercial, or you could make it intense and contrasty, orange & teal, like a contemporary action/thriller. But I generally choose to start with a version of "normal" before screwing with the picture later on in the color adjustments.

    I've been very impressed with Red color processing in the last 2-3 years, particularly with the Helium-based models. You can get a very "film-like" feel out of it, something approaching how Alexa Log-C responds in the color room.
    marc wielage, csi colorist/post consultant daVinci Resolve Certified Trainer
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