Thread: Shooting doors off from a Helicopter

Reply to Thread
Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 123 LastLast
Results 11 to 20 of 21
  1. #11  
    Senior Member Giles Harvey's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    OxfordShire
    Posts
    137
    Quote Originally Posted by Björn Benckert View Post
    Yes high alltitude, far from object and hardly moving and streifing/shooting sidways works well no need for gimbal in sush shot just shoot short shutter and things can be stabilized in post.

    flying fast looking foward and passing close is a different scenario.
    100% no comparison. If i had the money it would have been a heli mounted gimble for sure
    I've got a black belt in keeping it real!
    Reply With Quote  
     

  2. #12  
    Senior Member Aaron Lochert's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2013
    Location
    Tucson, AZ
    Posts
    1,091
    Quote Originally Posted by Giles Harvey View Post
    neither film has been stabilised in post
    Not trying to discredit you, but I think you did stabilize the shot at 12 seconds in the Alps video, yeah? Your letterbox is moving up and down in compensation. Looked like a fun shoot, great shots!
    Reply With Quote  
     

  3. #13  
    Senior Member Brian F Kobylarz's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    Norwich, CT. USA
    Posts
    1,270
    Depending on the subject matter, you can get decent shots with the doors off.
    For these shots, used a Tyler mini mount gyro. Since it does not attach to the helicopter airframe, no FAA approval is required.

    https://vimeo.com/manage/265065618/general

    Uses two Kenyon K8 Gyros for stabilization. They take about 15 minutes to fully spin up. A pogo stick below acts as a shock absorber and carries the weight.
    Quick and easy.
    Reply With Quote  
     

  4. #14  
    Senior Member Mark K.'s Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Melbourne, Australia
    Posts
    1,139
    Quote Originally Posted by Marc Wielage View Post
    I have a good friend who was drafted into doing the "beauty shots" of Tampa Stadium for a weekend CBS Sports TV football event in the 1970s. He strapped himself into place wearing a harness and let his legs dangle over the edge of an open-door copter and handheld a live camera with a microwave feed back to the truck, which they used every time they came in and out of commercial. A couple of times, the helicopter banked at a steep angle to get a better shot, and my friend nearly slid out, but the straps seemed to hold him in place.

    As the game ended, they landed the craft in an adjacent parking lot. My friend laid the camera down and was horrified to discover that the second strap was not bolted to anything! There was a hook on the end, but they forgot to actually clip it to the bracket on the wall. So he was "this close" to dying on the air, all just to get a shot. Let's just say things were pretty loose in the 1970s.

    If you shoot out of the doors of a helicopter, make absolutely sure you are double/triple-held firmly in place and there's no way you can fall out.
    My heart ended up in my mouth just reading that Marc :o terrifying.
    Reply With Quote  
     

  5. #15  
    Senior Member Giles Harvey's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    OxfordShire
    Posts
    137
    Quote Originally Posted by Aaron Lochert View Post
    Not trying to discredit you, but I think you did stabilize the shot at 12 seconds in the Alps video, yeah? Your letterbox is moving up and down in compensation. Looked like a fun shoot, great shots!
    Sorry I must have missed that must have had a go at a couple of shots. A while ago now. But you get my drift.
    I've got a black belt in keeping it real!
    Reply With Quote  
     

  6. #16  
    Senior Member Peter Strietmann's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    NorCal
    Posts
    1,374
    I'm with Brian. Tyler mount works well. Back in the day it was understood between the pilot and the operator that the harness would be unfastened while the operator was shooting. There is a tremendous force pulling you out the door or pushing you back in the door while the heli goes into hard banks. It depends which side you are seated on. But in those days to get a good shot you had to have both feet on the heli rails to control the camera while going through those Gs. Some people use to use shock cords fastened above the camera. I never did that but I did do some hand held work in Russia back in early 90s. A lot of this depends on the pilot and their experience. I once flew with a Viet Nam pilot who was very aggressive he was flying through peaks in BC, kind of weaving in and out, way above the tree line. It was the most awesome and terrifying experience of my life. Good luck.
    A Peter Strietmann
    plaidass1@mac.com
    [url]https://peterstrietmann.com

    "Read or bleed people, learn or burn."
    Reply With Quote  
     

  7. #17  
    Moderator Phil Holland's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Los Angeles
    Posts
    11,332
    My very first helicopter filming experience was similar to what was described here. Strapped heavily to the bird, sat on the edge, then stood on the skids to operate the shoot. XL2 w/ Kenyon Gyros to stabilize the camera. Safety line on camera and mags. A remote nature area well north of Vancouver. Did some low tree and higher cliff work mainly for those shots.

    Results were decent due to the shoulder cushion and Kenyon gyro setup for short takes. Similarly I've seen people using gimbals inside helicopters filming out the door, I've only done it twice and didn't think it was the best way at all. At that point your body plays a role in damping the high frequency vibrations as well as the gimbal smoothing the motion. The whole bungie cord method is silly as hell and might net you a few seconds of a decent take. You're very limited when working out the door in terms of what types of shots you can get.

    Safety-wise, just ensure you're strapped in as well as anything that could potentially fall out of the cabin. Shot-wise, there's way better ways to get the shot.

    Outside of earlier mount experience, I've been mostly using appropriate gimbals. A smidge of GSS and Cineflex, and very much outnumbered by the Shotover F1 and K1. Pretty much responsible for well over 95% of my aerial work now. Anything you've seen that I've done in the last decade has been from those 3 systems.
    Phil Holland - Cinematographer - Los Angeles
    ________________________________
    phfx.com IMDB
    PHFX | tools

    2X RED Monstro 8K VV Bodies and a lot of things to use with them.

    Data Sheets and Notes:
    Red Weapon/DSMC2
    Red Dragon
    Reply With Quote  
     

  8. #18  
    Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2018
    Location
    San Diego, CA
    Posts
    71
    I just got back from my second job shooting Heli footage with a Movi Pro. The footage came out good and much better than handheld but not as good as GSS or Shotover for sure. It can be done and you can get it to look nice. Here is a link to my first job shooting with this set up in a R44 with one door off. Red Raven and Canon 24-105mm in this for the Heli footage.

    https://vimeo.com/355782198
    Reply With Quote  
     

  9. #19  
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2017
    Posts
    133
    I did that once. ONCE! Don't underestimate how scary it is being in a helicopter without a door next to you. We were hovering around skyscrapers in Chicago and it felt like it would drop 5-10 feet. Can't say if it actually did, but damn it was frightening. It made me scared of heights for about 5 years, like some sort of PTSD.
    Reply With Quote  
     

  10. #20  
    You will need to stabilize depending on how aggressive the shots are and how smooth the pilot is. I just did it shooting some boats, and there were very few shots that wouldn’t benefit from stabilization of some sort. If the flying is aggressive, don’t expect long usable takes. Also you can decrease shutter angle a bit, 172 or 144 depending on how much motion blur you want on your subject opposed to the foreground or background. I shot at 172 and had a decent amount of sharp frames of the boats, with half of them resulting in some motion blur. Increasing speed helps with eliminating perceivable motion blur on the object you are tracking.

    Like others said, a shot over would be ideal, and should be arranged if the client is looking for long shots that need nominal post work to make usable.
    Reply With Quote  
     

Posting Permissions
  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts