Thread: Camera size theory

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  1. #11  
    Unless you're talking about needing more people to carry cases of equipment, it takes the same number of people to set-up and work a big or small camera. Just depends on what you are trying to do with it and how you want to deal with your workflow on set. If you wanted to shoot a movie on an Alexa Mini or a Red Epic, etc. with a couple of primes and a tiny crew, you could do that.

    A lot depends on your attitude to the gear and your style of filmmaking. If you want to shoot a movie on an iPhone with no attachments, handheld or a small gimbal, then probably you'd have a smaller crew because you wouldn't be dealing with focus-pulling and equipment cases, but in that situation, all you've managed to do is eliminate one or two people (1st and/or 2nd AC.) But certainly it might feel more freeing and freewheeling.
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  2. #12  
    Senior Member Aaron Lochert's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Daniel Porto View Post
    it's just a simple different thought pattern between CAN'T DO and CAN DO.
    You should never have the thought of "CAN'T DO" when writing, IMO. That goes beyond just equipment and crew requirements. Don't think about how you're gonna do it. Just write it for what the story demands. If it demands 400 extras in a scene, write it. If some cars need to crash and explode in a set-piece, write it. Take your director's hat off and put your writer's hat on.

    Once you have the funding for it, only then do you figure out what tools you need to tell the story in the most efficient way.
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  3. #13  
    Quote Originally Posted by Aaron Lochert View Post
    You should never have the thought of "CAN'T DO" when writing, IMO. That goes beyond just equipment and crew requirements. Don't think about how you're gonna do it. Just write it for what the story demands. If it demands 400 extras in a scene, write it. If some cars need to crash and explode in a set-piece, write it. Take your director's hat off and put your writer's hat on.
    And when producer(s) get their hands on it and figures start rolling in the head with each page it becomes apparent how creative choices in writing determine the likelihood of the script being filmed.

    400 extras and explosions...we are doing just that right now...and more. Writing something and writing it so it works on the screen and having funding for it are different things. Where track record and production experience come to play.

    You make a good point in the context of focusing on writing and not overstepping into micromanagement of other areas, but some consideration always helps. It's easy to be creative without constraints. Not very realistic though. I'd suggest writing compelling, inspiring, moving quality story first. Which will see the light of day and gain recognition. There is time for explosions and 400 extras when the essence matures.
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  4. #14  
    Thanks for all the replies and your time :)
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