Thread: New PC build based on Puget Systems

Reply to Thread
Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 14
  1. #1 New PC build based on Puget Systems 
    Senior Member David Callahan's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Oklahoma City, OK
    Posts
    282
    I'm new to PC building, but my aging 2013 Mac Pro is miserable to edit 8k footage on these days. I'm moving to a PC.
    I tried to duplicate Puget Systems recommended Resolve system, as that's mainly where I'm editing.
    Here's my list:
    Intel Core i9-10900X 3.7 GHz 10-Core Processor
    Noctua NH-U12DXi4 55 CFM CPU Cooler
    Gigabyte X299 DESIGNARE EX ATX LGA2066 Motherboard
    32 GB DDR4-2666 Crucial RAM
    Samsung 970 Evo 2 TB M.2-2280 NVME Solid State Drive
    Asus GeForce RTX 2080 Ti 11 GB ROG Strix Gaming OC Video Card
    Fractal Design Define XL R2 (Black Pearl) ATX Full Tower Case
    EVGA SuperNOVA P2 1200 W 80+ Platinum Certified Fully Modular ATX Power Supply
    MS Windows 10 Pro

    Any thoughts or comments appreciated.
    Thank you in advance.
    David Callahan
    Resolute Visuals
    www.resolutevisuals.tv
    Reply With Quote  
     

  2. #2  
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2017
    Posts
    1,695
    As with all equipment it depends how you intent to use it and your budget.

    Capture codecs(incl. compression)? 8k.R3D 5:1 24fps needs more power than 8k.R3D 22:1 60fps.
    NLE's?
    Grading software?
    Delivery codecs?
    Rendering software?
    Other software?
    Local storage or external(ethernet/USB/TB3)?
    expectations of the system?
    etc...

    The puget test are based on the following codecs and frame rates:

    All test Media (59.94 FPS)
    4K CinemaRaw Light 10 bit
    4K H.264 150mbps 8-bit
    4K ProRes 422
    4K ProRes 4444
    4K RED (compression ???)
    8K H.265 100mbps
    8K RED 22:1 Linus Tech Tips compression
    Reply With Quote  
     

  3. #3  
    Senior Member David Callahan's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Oklahoma City, OK
    Posts
    282
    Mostly I edit in Resolve, but sometimes in PPro and the Creative Cloud apps. I'm coming from the Mac world and have a Pegasus R6 Raid that I want to reformat and use. It's still great. Thunderbolt 2 connection. Mostly my footage is R3D 6k/8k at 24 fps, but often 60 fps at 12:1 to 15:1. Most of my deliveries are h.264 for the web or TV spots/broadcast. But often export a higher quality master as well. I also mix in a lot of Blackmagic Raw footage as well.
    David Callahan
    Resolute Visuals
    www.resolutevisuals.tv
    Reply With Quote  
     

  4. #4  
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2017
    Posts
    1,695
    Spend $400 more and you have an i9-10980xe which can handle 8k.R3D 24fps 5:1 in realtime at full-res premium and 64GB instead of 32GB might also help improving system performance.
    Reply With Quote  
     

  5. #5  
    Here's the crazy thing about Puget Systems: if you them them what you want to do with your system (presumably not merely run benchmarks), they will use their considerable knowledge and experience to spec and build a machine that will work for you. Heck, that's even their business model!
    Michael Tiemann, Chapel Hill NC

    "Dream so big you can share!"
    Reply With Quote  
     

  6. #6  
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Posts
    347
    if in USA, i'd just pick up the phone and call them, they have a decent rep for support, that and haveing it built right the first time are likely worth the pretty reasonable upcharge
    Reply With Quote  
     

  7. #7  
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    Hollywood, USA
    Posts
    6,340
    Quote Originally Posted by David Callahan View Post
    I'm new to PC building, but my aging 2013 Mac Pro is miserable to edit 8k footage on these days. I'm moving to a PC.
    If you've been working on Macs all this time, why not wait for the 2019 Mac Pro?

    My solution for a workflow issue like editing 8K material would be to transcode it all to a lower-res format, edit the transcodes, lock the edit, then bring in the 8K originals, then color & finish with those.
    marc wielage, csi colorist/post consultant daVinci Resolve Certified Trainer
    Reply With Quote  
     

  8. #8  
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2017
    Posts
    1,695
    Quote Originally Posted by Marc Wielage View Post
    If you've been working on Macs all this time, why not wait for the 2019 Mac Pro?

    My solution for a workflow issue like editing 8K material would be to transcode it all to a lower-res format, edit the transcodes, lock the edit, then bring in the 8K originals, then color & finish with those.
    With current day technology you don't have to do that anymore, a sub $4k workstation should do the trick. The new Mac Pro starts at $6k and is not powerful enough.
    Reply With Quote  
     

  9. #9  
    Senior Member Steve Sherrick's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Boston
    Posts
    7,060
    Quote Originally Posted by Misha Engel View Post
    With current day technology you don't have to do that anymore, a sub $4k workstation should do the trick. The new Mac Pro starts at $6k and is not powerful enough.
    How many video streams? Client supervised sessions? How much footage? How much data storage on the editing system? Networked? Multiple editors? Editor working on laptop while traveling?

    This is a big misconception that proxies are not needed anymore. They certainly are in various workflows. If that wasn't the case, then they would just edit natively on Hollywood features, where presumably budget is not as much of an issue. But they don't. There are a lot of reasons why they don't, and many of those reasons have nothing to do with the resolution of the image. Just comes down to workflow.

    Where I would 100% agree with you though is for workflows where you're working in isolation, where perhaps you have quick turnarounds and transcoding adds too much time. Or you need to see the original resolution and quality as you work. There are certainly situations where working from the original files is beneficial. But proxies will be with us for a long time.
    Steve Sherrick
    Reply With Quote  
     

  10. #10  
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2017
    Posts
    1,695
    Quote Originally Posted by Steve Sherrick View Post
    How many video streams? Client supervised sessions? How much footage? How much data storage on the editing system? Networked? Multiple editors? Editor working on laptop while traveling?

    This is a big misconception that proxies are not needed anymore. They certainly are in various workflows. If that wasn't the case, then they would just edit natively on Hollywood features, where presumably budget is not as much of an issue. But they don't. There are a lot of reasons why they don't, and many of those reasons have nothing to do with the resolution of the image. Just comes down to workflow.

    Where I would 100% agree with you though is for workflows where you're working in isolation, where perhaps you have quick turnarounds and transcoding adds too much time. Or you need to see the original resolution and quality as you work. There are certainly situations where working from the original files is beneficial. But proxies will be with us for a long time.
    4 streams, yes, 4 TB, 20TB,10GB/s,with multi workstations, laptops or smartwatches, at 1/8 no problem.
    Reply With Quote  
     

Posting Permissions
  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts