Thread: Davinci Resolve: how to reframe 8k videos into 4k?

Reply to Thread
Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 21
  1. #1 Davinci Resolve: how to reframe 8k videos into 4k? 
    I would like to try some 8k footages, my timeline is in 4k, and i woule like to know more about reframing process in Resolve. Could somebody help me? May i need to use the "zoom" into "inspector"? or is there another more accurate tool to understand the % of the resolution wich are you working on it?
    Reply With Quote  
     

  2. #2  
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    Hollywood, USA
    Posts
    6,345
    Crop or scale? If you scale it (using zoom), you will inevitably have aliasing and other artifacts... they're not gigantic, but they are noticeable if you know what to look for.

    If you crop, there is zero loss in picture quality... but you have to frame for it to begin with in production.

    So it depends. Colorist and pal Kevin Cannon posted a discussion about this some years back on the LiftGammaGain.com forum:

    http://liftgammagain.com/forum/index...d-shapes.5217/

    Chapter 9 of the Resolve 16.1 manual, "Image Sizing and Resolution Independence," is of crucial importance. This is one of the chapters I often tell students to read twice. Starts on page 258.
    marc wielage, csi • colorist/post consultant • daVinci Resolve Certified Trainer
    Reply With Quote  
     

  3. #3  
    Senior Member Patrick Tresch's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    Switzerland, Lausanne
    Posts
    5,070
    Quote Originally Posted by Marc Wielage View Post
    Crop or scale? If you scale it (using zoom), you will inevitably have aliasing and other artifacts... they're not gigantic, but they are noticeable if you know what to look for.
    How do you get aliasing when downsampling an 8k file to an 4k timeline? Does it need something like a low pass filter?

    Pat
    Reply With Quote  
     

  4. #4  
    Quote Originally Posted by Roberto Leone View Post
    I would like to try some 8k footages, my timeline is in 4k, and i woule like to know more about reframing process in Resolve. Could somebody help me? May i need to use the "zoom" into "inspector"? or is there another more accurate tool to understand the % of the resolution wich are you working on it?
    If this is specific zoom percentage and framing, independent per clip, inspector is the only option. Make sure you do test renders and check different scaling algorithms in project preferences.
    Analog > Apollo wooden handgrip http://omeneo.com
    Digital > Primers - professional image transformation tools http://omeneo.com/primers

    imdb


    "Como delfines en el fondo del oceano
    volamos por el universo incentivados por la esperanza"

    "L'esperanza", Sven Vδth
    "It's a poor sort of memory that only works backwards"
    Jung/ Carol
    Reply With Quote  
     

  5. #5  
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    Hollywood, USA
    Posts
    6,345
    Quote Originally Posted by Patrick Tresch View Post
    How do you get aliasing when downsampling an 8k file to an 4k timeline? Does it need something like a low pass filter?
    It depends on scene content. I've seen it in all kinds of situations, certainly even with film going back years. We get it today with 4K restorations if the film is sharp enough and they happened to hit just the right combination of factors for contrast and brightness. We fix it where applicable. Aliasing is still a huge problem with the wrong costumes (as just one example), with certain fabric patterns.
    marc wielage, csi • colorist/post consultant • daVinci Resolve Certified Trainer
    Reply With Quote  
     

  6. #6  
    Quote Originally Posted by Marc Wielage View Post
    Crop or scale? If you scale it (using zoom), you will inevitably have aliasing and other artifacts... they're not gigantic, but they are noticeable if you know what to look for.

    If you crop, there is zero loss in picture quality... but you have to frame for it to begin with in production.

    So it depends. Colorist and pal Kevin Cannon posted a discussion about this some years back on the LiftGammaGain.com forum:

    http://liftgammagain.com/forum/index...d-shapes.5217/

    Chapter 9 of the Resolve 16.1 manual, "Image Sizing and Resolution Independence," is of crucial importance. This is one of the chapters I often tell students to read twice. Starts on page 258.
    ik thanks a lot!
    I can zoom it, but i don't know how to crop, and play inside the crop..do you know a video tutorial somewhere?
    Reply With Quote  
     

  7. #7  
    Senior Member rand thompson's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Posts
    5,587
    Roberto,


    Here a link to a few cropping tutorials in resolve.

    https://www.youtube.com/results?sear...e+16++cropping
    Reply With Quote  
     

  8. #8  
    Quote Originally Posted by rand thompson View Post
    Roberto,


    Here a link to a few cropping tutorials in resolve.

    https://www.youtube.com/results?sear...e+16++cropping
    ok thanks
    Reply With Quote  
     

  9. #9  
    Senior Member rand thompson's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Posts
    5,587
    Roberto,


    Imho, the absolute best way to get the most accurate, consistent , highest quality crops, with the best selection of scaling Algorithms when using Red footage is in Redcine-X Pro and not in Resolve at all.
    Reply With Quote  
     

  10. #10  
    Senior Member Patrick Tresch's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    Switzerland, Lausanne
    Posts
    5,070
    Quote Originally Posted by rand thompson View Post
    Roberto,


    Imho, the absolute best way to get the most accurate, consistent , highest quality crops, with the best selection of scaling Algorithms when using Red footage is in Redcine-X Pro and not in Resolve at all.
    But isn't it based on the same SDK? Does RCX use another algorithm to change the scaling as what Resolve uses?
    Reply With Quote  
     

Posting Permissions
  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts