Thread: Apple Pro XDR Display

Reply to Thread
Results 1 to 7 of 7
  1. #1 Apple Pro XDR Display 
    Senior Member DJ Meyer's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Posts
    944
    I am curious to hear feedback from anyone who has been using the XDR specifically as a grading monitor in lieu of the more common Sony BVM or similar.

    Does it meet your expectations?
    Reply With Quote  
     

  2. #2  
    Senior Member Eric Santiago's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    Canada
    Posts
    4,124
    There are some video links that favor the XDR for grading.

    I have to dig it up.
    < Someday I'll be cool enough to have something witty here >
    Reply With Quote  
     

  3. #3  
    Senior Member AndreeMarkefors's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    Switzerland
    Posts
    850
    Consensus on 'Lift, Gamma, Gain" (a color grading forum) is that Apple's XDR monitor doesn't meet the requirements for a grading monitor. One issue that comes up more than others is 'glow' due to the LED dimming techniques used.

    Admittedly, people who are not happy with the monitor are critical users—and rightly so. This is equipment that is supposed to be used to verify standardised deliverables.

    If you look at it more as a next gen 'computer monitor' it fares better. But in that category it's expensive of course and not the cheap underdog it was presented as.

    This monitor would probably be a huge upgrade compared to any old monitor that people use today for general work, or even compared to popular "photography monitors", but it's not comparable to highest end grading monitors.
    Reply With Quote  
     

  4. #4  
    Senior Member Robino_J's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Posts
    521
    Quote Originally Posted by AndreeMarkefors View Post
    Consensus on 'Lift, Gamma, Gain" (a color grading forum) is that Apple's XDR monitor doesn't meet the requirements for a grading monitor. One issue that comes up more than others is 'glow' due to the LED dimming techniques used.

    Admittedly, people who are not happy with the monitor are critical users—and rightly so. This is equipment that is supposed to be used to verify standardised deliverables.

    If you look at it more as a next gen 'computer monitor' it fares better. But in that category it's expensive of course and not the cheap underdog it was presented as.

    This monitor would probably be a huge upgrade compared to any old monitor that people use today for general work, or even compared to popular "photography monitors", but it's not comparable to highest end grading monitors.
    I returned mine - the blooming and luminance shift (led dimming) were too much for me. It's a nicely designed piece of equipment but I'll wait to see if they release another version later on.

    Here's the dimming in action, on my ex XDR display, shot on R3D :)

    Reply With Quote  
     

  5. #5  
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2016
    Location
    Miami
    Posts
    332
    I just got mine today, I asked for the Nano version with no reflection and I can say its amazing as monitor Haven't try it for grading yet.
    Instagram: @rv12
    Vimeo: @rv12
    Reply With Quote  
     

  6. #6  
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    Hollywood, USA
    Posts
    6,358
    Here's a link to the LiftGammaGain XDR thread, which has more than 320 comments so far:

    https://liftgammagain.com/forum/inde...grading.12846/

    The TL;dr version is that the monitor only has 576 local dimming points, which is not enough to reproduce HDR without noticeable blooming. A real HDR monitor needs at least 2000, which even some competing computer displays already have. You wonder why Apple failed to understand this during the design phase.
    marc wielage, csi colorist/post consultant daVinci Resolve Certified Trainer
    Reply With Quote  
     

  7. #7  
    Quote Originally Posted by Marc Wielage View Post
    Here's a link to the LiftGammaGain XDR thread, which has more than 320 comments so far:

    https://liftgammagain.com/forum/inde...grading.12846/

    The TL;dr version is that the monitor only has 576 local dimming points, which is not enough to reproduce HDR without noticeable blooming. A real HDR monitor needs at least 2000, which even some competing computer displays already have. You wonder why Apple failed to understand this during the design phase.
    2000 for 4K implies 4500 local zones needed for 6K. So Apple really missed the mark by almost a factor of 8, not just a factor of 4. But who cares what the math says if it's designed by somebody with nice shoes?
    Michael Tiemann, Chapel Hill NC

    "Dream so big you can share!"
    Reply With Quote  
     

Posting Permissions
  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts