Thread: Hollywood Gaffer explains Lighting Filters and Diffusion Julian White

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  1. #1 Hollywood Gaffer explains Lighting Filters and Diffusion Julian White 
    Senior Member rand thompson's Avatar
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    Hollywood Gaffer explains Lighting Filters and Diffusion Julian White


    By CookeOpticsTV

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  2. #2  
    At 4:20 (or so) he asks "why does Hollywood make moonlight blue? It's gray. It's a reflected light." True, but...have you ever noticed the color of daylight? Dimmed down, and compared to candle-light (orTungsten if doing more modern work) it's blue! Just thought I'd point out the obvious.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Michael Tiemann View Post
    Dimmed down, and compared to candle-light (orTungsten if doing more modern work) it's blue!
    You're totally right.

    Seems like the color of moonlight as filmed is a matter of artistic choice and therefore fashion, to some degree-- or at least the choice of how saturated it is. Lots of blue moonlight in 1980s horror. (I've also noticed significantly different saturation levels to the moonlight in different transfers of HALLOWEEN over the years-- from the very blue Anchor Bay DVD release to the much more gray DCP released something like 10 years ago--, so I guess that fashion also affects what should theoretically be preservation work...)
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    Moderator Phil Holland's Avatar
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    Julian is great. I think the whole blue moonlight thing is most disturbing when a glaring trend arises. There was a while where it was this overly saturated blue and it was far to common. As our very own David Mullen has demonstrated when taking a normal looking exposure under night conditions with the correct white balance moonlight is a very sterile white light that does have a subtle impact on color too. Which is something important to know when doing a day for night as it's not always just all about exposure. If you are going the stylized route as Julian mentioned it's fine, but he's right about taste coming into the mix for that.

    His note is really dead on about CTS and hero light treatment. Way, way back when I was gaffing and as I was filming up and down the west coast from LA through Vancouver it was very common to see a DP order a sandwich, which was usually a couple 4x4' filters either stacked onto a single frame. Straw and Opal (various strengths) became something I was real fond of because it was so commonly used. Just adds that little romantic warmth. At a certain point if it's a hero treatment the DP will just ask for a sandwich and you just know what that is.
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  5. #5  
    Moonlight is reflected sunlight, and the color temp drops into the mid-4000s so it is still colder than artificial sources at night like firelight, candlelight, and tungsten lamps. And if you're outside in moonlight and are seeing more with your rods instead of your cones in low-light, then the saturation will be lowered. Hence the silvery quality that some people speak of. But the truth is that it is mostly an artistic decision. Blue might be a symbolic color, it might make a scene more romantic or the opposite, more frightening, etc.
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  6. #6  
    Here is a photo I took under real moonlight:

    David Mullen, ASC
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    Senior Member rand thompson's Avatar
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    David,

    First, that's a great looking image! Secondly, I guess I've been so conditioned to seeing moonlight in movies expressed as more Blue/Cyan, that the picture above looks strange.
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    Quote Originally Posted by David Mullen ASC View Post
    Here is a photo I took under real moonlight:

    That does look great.

    I was inspired by some of the earlier (similar) photos you posted to shoot a bit of night for night with an S1H at 51,200 ISO on an f1.2 lens wide open. (Occasionally with a 360 shutter.) During a full moon.

    The look is really pretty boring. It looks a lot light day for night. I forget if I white balanced to 3200K, I think I did, but it looked pretty blue.

    On the other hand, the image is fairly well exposed. Were there full snow cover or white sands, it would be a completely useable image imo.
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  9. #9  
    Senior Member rand thompson's Avatar
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    Deconstructing Film Lighting || Masterclass by gaffer Julian White


    By CookeOpticsTV






    Cinematography Lighting Tips: Practicals and Night Scenes || Julian White || Masterclass


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  10. #10  
    Senior Member rand thompson's Avatar
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    Cinematographers: What is your favourite light and why? || Spotlight


    By CookeOpticsTV


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