Thread: Mattebox handheld question

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  1. #11  
    Quote Originally Posted by Steve Sherrick View Post
    It’s been done for years, and even by some of the best camera operators in the business. Personal preference and feel I suppose. Not sure how common it is these days as there are a lot more operators that came up through the digital age with everything from DSLR rigs through the traditional cinema rigs. Spider grips seem common in many rigs I see on set.
    Quote Originally Posted by Jamie A View Post
    Hi Arsene,
    This is my preferred way of operating handheld, and for many feature/episodic operators here in LA. I find it's a more precise way of operating especially when you need to move the camera quickly.

    Any of the Arri rod mounted (15mm or 19mm, it doesn't really matter) matteboxes will be fine for this. Swing away MB's are fine too.

    My last season of episodic TV was Alexa Mini with Panavision cage, G series anamorphic lenses, Preston MDR3 & Lightranger, Bolt 3000, 2 x Dionic 90 batteries and Arri LMB 19mm Matte Box. Holding it by the matte box is no problem for this pretty big camera package.

    I recommend using a shoulder pad that straps across your body/chest (not attached to the camera) and keeping the base of the camera as flat as possible.
    I guess this kinda parallels what I've seen most of my career with owner/operators vs. others. Guys that do not own the gear, generally*, will treat it much differently than if it was theirs.



    *I say generally, because I do know some guys that beat the snot out of their gear. Worse than almost anyone renting or being a staffer would.
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  2. #12  
    Moderator Phil Holland's Avatar
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    Heh. You guys always used to see that cloth rag I keep with me on set in my bts photos, which gave my tripod shots a bit of a rock and roll vibe. One of the uses of that rag was indeed to be folded up and tossed under my shirt over my right shoulder to use as a pad when aspiring for comfort on long days.

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  3. #13  
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    Thanks for all the quick replies!!

    Quote Originally Posted by Jamie A View Post
    Hi Arsene,
    This is my preferred way of operating handheld, and for many feature/episodic operators here in LA. I find it's a more precise way of operating especially when you need to move the camera quickly.

    Any of the Arri rod mounted (15mm or 19mm, it doesn't really matter) matteboxes will be fine for this. Swing away MB's are fine too.

    My last season of episodic TV was Alexa Mini with Panavision cage, G series anamorphic lenses, Preston MDR3 & Lightranger, Bolt 3000, 2 x Dionic 90 batteries and Arri LMB 19mm Matte Box. Holding it by the matte box is no problem for this pretty big camera package.

    I recommend using a shoulder pad that straps across your body/chest (not attached to the camera) and keeping the base of the camera as flat as possible.

    Exactly what I mean, and am looking to hear!

    It just feels more natural to do this way for certain positions / angles / movements.

    I'm a big fan of shoulderpad strapped to the shoulder/body and keeping the base as flat as possible. The strapped shoulderpad is one of the reasons for keeping it as flat as possible.


    Quote Originally Posted by Steve Sherrick View Post
    Something like this can work well.
    http://holzerenterprises.com
    Thank you for the link
    I didn't know there were others than the HOP Shoulderpad! (Now called DFS shoulderpad I think)

    If there are even more manufacturers let me know :)
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  4. #14  
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    Quote Originally Posted by Christopher A. Bell View Post
    I guess this kinda parallels what I've seen most of my career with owner/operators vs. others. Guys that do not own the gear, generally*, will treat it much differently than if it was theirs.



    *I say generally, because I do know some guys that beat the snot out of their gear. Worse than almost anyone renting or being a staffer would.
    The Arri LMB or larger matte boxes can easily handle this. It's been done for over 30 years. Some of the rod mounted Bright Tangerine models are solid too.

    Arsene, contact Brad Richard (focusfrets at gmail). He's an operator in LA & makes the best shoulder pad out there. It's wide and low profile so it doesn't slip on your body. Avoid the high/bulky pads. It needs to have plenty of room to be able to slide the camera forwards and backwards.
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  5. #15  
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    It's certainly done, I don't do it, because it's an ergonomic nightmare. Even if the camera is perfectly balanced your arms are up to high. That's basing it on the premise that good hand held form has your elbows resting on your chest. You also have to bend your wrists unnaturally to grab the matte box. But to each his own.

    One note is on dramatic TV and movies, takes aren't usually that long. I have never seen a doc shooter holding the matte box because it's god awful uncomfortable ;-)

    Nick
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  6. #16  
    Moderator Phil Holland's Avatar
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    I'm in the back right now, but if you cats dig deep on the forum you'll see my shoulder setups from the last decade here and there.

    The one I still rock is using the bits of RED Clutch bits for a slide on 19mm handle situation, the left handle has one of those curved dog bones to go further in front of the arm, and the shoulder pad is a slip on dovetail situation.

    RED wen with the firm tactile pad for that kit which is nice for many, but some might prefer a softer pad if you are operating 6-12 hours on the shoulder.

    It's rare for me to do an entire day on the shoulder, but breaking out longer rods and using a batter plate on the rear of the system away from the body allows for pretty nice balance. Feels more like you're driving a car with a heavy parrot on your shoulder and not fighting to keep him there.
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    Red Dragon
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  7. #17  
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nick Gardner View Post
    It's certainly done, I don't do it, because it's an ergonomic nightmare. Even if the camera is perfectly balanced your arms are up to high. That's basing it on the premise that good hand held form has your elbows resting on your chest. You also have to bend your wrists unnaturally to grab the matte box. But to each his own.

    One note is on dramatic TV and movies, takes aren't usually that long. I have never seen a doc shooter holding the matte box because it's god awful uncomfortable ;-)

    Nick
    As mentioned each to their own, but I don't find it uncomfortable at all. Holding the camera with both hands right next to the lens gives it a more responsive feel, which is why many great operators do it this way. Similar to why many operators grip the battery instead of a pan handle on a fluid head.
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