Thread: Pluses of global shutter.

Reply to Thread
Page 2 of 4 FirstFirst 1234 LastLast
Results 11 to 20 of 40
  1. #11  
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Posts
    4,245
    Couple of global shutter images from my Bolex.



    Reply With Quote  
     

  2. #12  
    3D Tracking.

    An example you are going to track on or replace body parts onto a person. Even if you got a perfect match and seamles integration of that person when standing still. When the person move within the frame of a rolling shutter camera the actual shape of the person will change with the movement. For example if you stand jumping up and down infront of a rolling shutter camera your body parts will not have the same length on the different frames.

    The above makes 3D tracking and CG compositing more difficult. As a rolling shutter actually bends your arm when you wave your hand.

    And to me the artifacts of rolling shutter, like cars that get skewed when driving trough frame. And the kind of jelly effect it gives to shaky hand held material is ugly and disturbing to watch even when its not any extreme movements.

    So to me a global shutter looks better than a rolling shutter for pretty much everything. The only time the rolling shutter is on par with a global shutter is when you shot still objects with a fixed camera. And then you can argue that its easier to make a rolling shutter sensor with high senitivity and latitude and for the most shots its not so noticeable. But I think when people start to use komodo next to orher cameras more people will start to dislike rolling shutter.
    Björn Benckert
    Creative Lead & Founder Syndicate Entertainment AB
    +46855524900 www.syndicate.se/axis
    VFX / Flame / Motion capture / Monstro
    Reply With Quote  
     

  3. #13  
    Senior Member Bob Gundu's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Toronto, ON Canada
    Posts
    10,147
    If anyone has done a warp stabilizer knows how bad it can look. Global shutter should alleviate much of those issues.
    ___________________________

    VFX, Cinematographer, Photographer
    10 frame handles
    Vimeo
    Instagram
    Reply With Quote  
     

  4. #14  
    Rolling shutter is the single most annoying thing about cameras for me at the moment.

    As Bjorn points out - tracking with rolling shutter is a nightmare, honest to god nightmare. I had to do a plate track off some Helium footage a few weeks ago - handheld and a strong vertical tilt up. That was enough to vertically compress then bounce the image back.

    I shot a scene with a horizontal tracking move over the weekend. Just aesthetically wrong. And i'm tracking someone, it's not like i can tell them to move in slow motion because then it's not natural.

    Also just hand holding something. We all have micro jitters and i don't know about others but i can detect the jello in a scene very easily and find it super off-putting. There's a solidity to a global shutter than just feels right.

    Komodo is on my radar for that. But i do wonder whether once you have komodo you'd shoot everything with it, sort of rendering the helium obsolete. Yet the rigging and work flow will be better on DSMC2.

    cheers
    Paul
    -------------------
    insta: @paul.inventome
    Reply With Quote  
     

  5. #15  
    The car footage Jarred posted to instagram and Facebook the other day looks amazing with the global shutter. Can't wait to see the 4K final release. On the other hand, I love the frequency ripple you can get from guitar strings on rolling shutter cameras, but it varies amongst cameras and their reset or shutter cycle. Can also get some really funky effects from airplane propellers and car wheels, if you're looking for distortion or stylized stuff. All of these can be artistic tools. But yeah, I'm seriously excited for Komodo's global shutter.
    - Jeff Kilgroe
    - Applied Visual Technologies, LLC | RojoMojo
    - Just me and my 8K Monstro VV kicking ass.
    Reply With Quote  
     

  6. #16  
    Quote Originally Posted by Andrew Dease View Post
    People are touting the GS as a “reason” to buy this camera.

    I have used rolling shutter to advantage when visible on red in the past.


    So, if I am not shooting cars speeding, long lens quick pans, strobes,

    What other advantages does it have? There will no longer be flickering lights and fluctuations in fluorescents?
    Or there will because that’s shutter refresh.

    So for a ‘normal’ shooter, what is the master list of pluses to having GS?
    Quote Originally Posted by Andrew Dease View Post
    So, like the post says. I have used reds and experienced rolling shutter.

    That said what real world conditions (not helicopters), and not the ones I previously mentions, does GS help in?

    Like, a real world list. If this is such a big deal as some say, to them.
    No Flash Banding, No Jello, No Skew... What other reasons do you need?

    Maybe those of us that have spent the majority of our careers/lives shooting with “global shutter” cameras(before there was really term for it, because there weren’t really rolling shutter cameras) just know what these real advantages actually mean in the real world. I can’t wait for the day to come again when I never have to see a frame of video with flash banding.
    Reply With Quote  
     

  7. #17  
    Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2014
    Location
    Seattle, WA
    Posts
    31
    I think the advantages of GS over RS are pretty apparent... Better question would be what advantages does a camera with RS have over one with GS? Because I can't think of any...
    Reply With Quote  
     

  8. #18  
    Senior Member Brian F Kobylarz's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    Norwich, CT. USA
    Posts
    1,288
    Quote Originally Posted by Chase Butler View Post
    I think the advantages of GS over RS are pretty apparent... Better question would be what advantages does a camera with RS have over one with GS? Because I can't think of any...
    Rolling shutters allowed for increased sensitivity.
    There was more time for each photon to be captured and processed.

    This was almost necessary in early sensor designs to make video cameras usable for the ENG/EFP market.
    As sensor technology has advanced, that is no longer a real concern.
    Reply With Quote  
     

  9. #19  
    Quote Originally Posted by Brian F Kobylarz View Post
    Rolling shutters allowed for increased sensitivity.
    There was more time for each photon to be captured and processed.

    This was almost necessary in early sensor designs to make video cameras usable for the ENG/EFP market.
    As sensor technology has advanced, that is no longer a real concern.
    I look at it as It was a limitation of the technology. Even 5-8 years ago I was saying that if it came down to an extra stop of DR/sensitivity or GS, I'd take Global Shutter every single day of the week and twice on Sunday.
    Reply With Quote  
     

  10. #20  
    Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2014
    Location
    Seattle, WA
    Posts
    31
    Quote Originally Posted by Brian F Kobylarz View Post
    Rolling shutters allowed for increased sensitivity.
    There was more time for each photon to be captured and processed.

    This was almost necessary in early sensor designs to make video cameras usable for the ENG/EFP market.
    As sensor technology has advanced, that is no longer a real concern.
    Yeah this may have been the case 10-20 years ago but not anymore. GS > RS any day. I for one am very grateful they put GS in the KOMODO!
    Reply With Quote  
     

Posting Permissions
  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts