Thread: Roberto Schaefer: Lighting Masterclass

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  1. #11  
    Quote Originally Posted by David Mullen ASC View Post
    I don’t know about that, I’m fascinated by how things were done in the past, I’m always trying to mine ideas from something done 50 years ago... I also believe learning is a journey and it’s less about what’s current and more about the mental process and the experiences that have built one’s way of thinking.
    David, your posts here on REDUSER.net are alway appreciated by this RED user! You do a great job answering questions in ways that are both illuminating and practical.

    What bugged me about the RED ONE story is that Roberto never said why he picked up the RED ONE in the first place, only that the image quality coming from the camera was a complete mess. He then praised the fact that after RED made technical improvements (to firmware, which he took pains to say was not software!?), it got much better. And then he explained that after RED further improved the sensors (a few more generations!), it was up to scratch. It would have been fascinating to know why a DoP would have selected the RED ONE in the first place. Even when a questioner asked "Do you undertake challenges for the sake of seeing how you rise to the challenge, or do you see challenges as merely problems to be solved?" he could have given us the insights that we missed concerning things like using completely untested technology. But he didn't really answer that question in any way that spoke either to the art or the science of his approach. Thus the RED ONE story remained an unexamined anecdote that told us only that he was on the inside of a circle at a point in time and nothing about what he was looking for inside that circle, whether it ever existed, what its existence or lack of existence ultimately teaches.

    By contrast, his story about The Revenant was absolutely great teaching. He taught that (1) natural lighting is fleeting, unreliable, unreproducible, and usually doesn't obey the laws of good cinematic lighting; (2) if you KNOW all this and you plan your post ahead of time, and you have the budget for 18 weeks of post at $1500/hr, and you have the personnel and patience to rework every frame of the film in Resolve with 15-30 power windows per clip, you can create in post the cinematic lighting you want...if (3) you have a camera that has enough dynamic range to hold the highlight and shadow information necessary to relight. To me, that's not "Hollywooding", that's a story that teaches the fundamentals of lighting by teaching what it takes to go against those fundamentals.

    So in fact I do agree completely with your conclusion, that understanding the mental processes and experiences that build one's way of thinking is really what a masterclass should be about. I just get really annoyed when there's a lot of exposition that doesn't really pay off at the end.
    Michael Tiemann, Chapel Hill NC

    "Dream so big you can share!"
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  2. #12  
    Senior Member rand thompson's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jamil Stubbs View Post
    Rand,

    The videos you post are gold!! I'm about to watch your Vittorio Storaro master class you posted earlier!!

    Thanks Jamil!, I'm glad that you are enjoying them as much as I am.
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  3. #13  
    Senior Member Patrick Tresch's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Michael Tiemann View Post
    David, your posts here on REDUSER.net are alway appreciated by this RED user! You do a great job answering questions in ways that are both illuminating and practical.

    What bugged me about the RED ONE story is that Roberto never said why he picked up the RED ONE in the first place, only that the image quality coming from the camera was a complete mess. He then praised the fact that after RED made technical improvements (to firmware, which he took pains to say was not software!?), it got much better. And then he explained that after RED further improved the sensors (a few more generations!), it was up to scratch. It would have been fascinating to know why a DoP would have selected the RED ONE in the first place. Even when a questioner asked "Do you undertake challenges for the sake of seeing how you rise to the challenge, or do you see challenges as merely problems to be solved?" he could have given us the insights that we missed concerning things like using completely untested technology. But he didn't really answer that question in any way that spoke either to the art or the science of his approach. Thus the RED ONE story remained an unexamined anecdote that told us only that he was on the inside of a circle at a point in time and nothing about what he was looking for inside that circle, whether it ever existed, what its existence or lack of existence ultimately teaches.

    By contrast, his story about The Revenant was absolutely great teaching. He taught that (1) natural lighting is fleeting, unreliable, unreproducible, and usually doesn't obey the laws of good cinematic lighting; (2) if you KNOW all this and you plan your post ahead of time, and you have the budget for 18 weeks of post at $1500/hr, and you have the personnel and patients to rework every frame of the film in Resolve with 15-30 power windows per clip, you can create in post the cinematic lighting you want...if (3) you have a camera that has enough dynamic range to hold the highlight and shadow information necessary to relight. To me, that's not "Hollywooding", that's a story that teaches the fundamentals of lighting by teaching what it takes to go against those fundamentals.

    So in fact I do agree completely with your conclusion, that understanding the mental processes and experiences that build one's way of thinking is really what a masterclass should be about. I just get really annoyed when there's a lot of exposition that doesn't really pay off at the end.
    It looks like if the camera choice bothers him and he prefers that this technical part is taken care by the DIT and AC. He is speaking about dual iso in Panasonic Varicam and not mentionning that nearly all manunacturers do it, this also triggered my question about when this was recorded? Or is he more interested about lightning and framing than the camera choice?
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