Thread: Scratched RED Pro LCD 7" non-touch monitor repair options?

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  1. #1 Scratched RED Pro LCD 7" non-touch monitor repair options? 
    Junior Member
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    Hi all,

    My 7" non-touch screen RED Pro LCD monitor has incurred a few small scratches - no damage to the LCD or pixels, just surface scratches on the plastic on top of the LCD.

    RED confirmed they won't repair it, as this model is discontinued. Even when they were repairing it, they replaced the whole LCD.

    Can anyone out there repair this – by replacing the acrylic/plastic over the LCD? Are there any other options?


    https://imgur.com/a/jwCwVDJ
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  2. #2  
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    Use a drill or dremel buffer and buffing fluid.
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  3. #3  
    Member Mark A. Jaeger's Avatar
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    I differ with Andrew.

    The chance that you'll F it up is very high if you try machine polishing - especially with a Dremel as it is way too fast.

    Rubbing compound comes in two major flavors: those graded for hand polishing and those for machine polishing. The machine polishing compounds are finer even though they may be given the same name (fine, medium, etc). You can get these at professional auto body paint stores. You want the machine polishing compounds to assure you don't heat the plastic too much. You're trading elbow grease for control.

    Scratches are tough to get rid of if they are deep at all. Envision them as canyons. You need to remove the material that makes the canyon walls of the scratch and feather it into the surrounding material. This would mean sanding with 1000, 1500 and 2000 grit sandpaper then applying a spectrum of polishing compounds. None of this is easy or quick. It is easy to F it up.

    Do you really want to tackle this? If not, I suggest a light polishing with fine compound and then call it quits without trying to achieve like new appearance. The fine compound will shine things up but you'll still have the remnants of significant scratches.

    You may want to find a piece of plexiglass and put some scratches in similar to your monitor. Then try the technique you plan to use = safe test run.

    There's more to this story regarding the detail of how but I thought I would give you a bit to chew on.
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  4. #4  
    Senior Member Alex Lubensky's Avatar
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    Bring it to the trusted mobile phone/tablet repair service. It's literally a usual tablet screen inside, if they can change the glass without swapping the LCD on Iphone, I bet it's also doable here.
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  5. #5  
    Senior Member Eric Santiago's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Alex Lubensky View Post
    Bring it to the trusted mobile phone/tablet repair service. It's literally a usual tablet screen inside, if they can change the glass without swapping the LCD on Iphone, I bet it's also doable here.
    I've seen worse and got used to it on set.
    If the electronics go bad, that would be terrible :P
    < Someday I'll be cool enough to have something witty here >
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  6. #6  
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    Thanks for your replies, everyone.

    Quote Originally Posted by Alex Lubensky View Post
    Bring it to the trusted mobile phone/tablet repair service. It's literally a usual tablet screen inside, if they can change the glass without swapping the LCD on Iphone, I bet it's also doable here.
    It's an interesting idea, but has anyone successfully gone this route?
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