Thread: Dell UltraSharp 32″ HDR PremierColor Monitor

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  1. #51  
    Senior Member Blair S. Paulsen's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bruce Allen View Post
    (snip) As I was saying, if this new Dell monitor (or the Apple monitor) were a lot cheaper, it may make sense as an upgrade from the LG... but it's in a weird price bracket of "a LOT more expensive than the LG" but "also still not good enough REALLY."
    I'm sure there are people with the projects this makes sense for - I just find it an odd product category for Apple and Dell to both go for.
    Bruce Allen
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    Oh Bruce, Bruce, Bruce... trying to apply logic to marketing... ;-)

    Kidding aside, it is a strange value proposition when a device intended for a specific purpose - HDR/rec2020(100% P3) monitoring/grading - can't actually hit the spec. As others have noted, it seems more like a short term solution to the current issue of the high cost of legit HDR monitors. For a lot of projects, these "close but no cigar" displays will suffice for HDR grading passes good enough to meet deliverables contracts, plus, give DPs/DITs/Gaffers/etc a fair feel for how their images will look in HDR. Could that bar be cleared with displays that sell for under $2K? Where is the "good enough" line drawn?

    It seems likely that within a year or two or three we will see monitors with performance metrics equal to the $30K displays for under $10K. Based on that expectation and my particular business model, I'm going to live with a "decent", under $2K HDR monitor until better options emerge - then invest. Moreover, I really want a device that can handle high bandwidth signals and support 12bits to the panel. Achieving this will be a lot easier with updated SDI/DP/HDMI ports and internal processing chips able to handle 8K/60P 12bit baseband signals.

    Cheers - #19
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  2. #52  
    Senior Member Blair S. Paulsen's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by jake blackstone View Post
    It's not magic, no matter how much we'd all love to be able to buy a monitor, that would meet minimum Dolby Vision requirements for $5k.
    This monitor is not that much different from a number of other monitors, that use local dimming zones. SDR doesn't need 1000 nits light output, so in that case local dimming backlight is not used and it defaults to a native LCD 1300:1 dynamic range, but in HDR local dimming is used resulting in higher dynamic ratio. Even best LCD's by itself are not capable of more than something like 1300:1 native dynamic range. That is why manufacturers now using dual LCD screens technology in order to be able to achieve 1,000,000:1 contrast. It is better tech, than OLED used in X300 and much cheaper to produce than Dolby's own $250k monitors. But, unfortunately, as a result of using this very expensive new dual screen tech, monitors like Sony X310, Eizo CG3146, TV Logic LUM-310 or FSI XM311K and FSI XM310K are all $30k+.
    Agreed. I was just pointing out that the Dell "claims" enough contrast ratio to meet one spec, didn't mean to ignore the collateral damage of local dimming zones. My assumption is that dual screen tech and other approaches still in development will eventually yield options under $10K that have performance metrics as good as - or better than - the current crop of $30K monitors noted above.

    The real question is how long before that happens...

    Cheers - #19
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  3. #53  
    Senior Member jake blackstone's Avatar
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    No one with a gun will be standing by your side, if you want to use one of these "inexpensive" monitors for YouTube delivery.
    That is not what we're talking about when we are talking about meeting Dolby Vision minimum specs.
    This only apples if you're planning to deliver for one of the streamers- HBO, Netflix, Disney, Apple etc.
    All these deliveries must be done in an Dolby Vision approved facilities. That means, that Dolby representative will show up and inspect your monitor and it will be properly calibrated, if needed.
    If you missing a monitor, that meets specs, you will not be given Dolby Vision approval, simple. But that was true before Covid. No more in-person traing and facilities visits, all is done remotely now.
    And a couple of days ago that has changed again. Starting next year Dolby will stop certifying facilities.
    Instead, they will be certifying colorists and engineers. It is all very new and details are still sketchy, but the bottom line, if you delivering for Youtube, you're good using pretty much any monitor you can afford and deem "good enough".
    For proper Dolby Vision deliverables, not so much
    Jake Blackstone
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  4. #54  
    Senior Member Blair S. Paulsen's Avatar
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    Thanx for the info on evolving Dolby Vision protocols in the new normal. I'll endeavor to keep up ;-)

    Cheers - #19
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  5. #55  
    Senior Member rand thompson's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by jake blackstone View Post
    No one with a gun will be standing by your side, if you want to use one of these "inexpensive" monitors for YouTube delivery.
    That is not what we're talking about when we are talking about meeting Dolby Vision minimum specs.
    This only apples if you're planning to deliver for one of the streamers- HBO, Netflix, Disney, Apple etc.
    All these deliveries must be done in an Dolby Vision approved facilities. That means, that Dolby representative will show up and inspect your monitor and it will be properly calibrated, if needed.
    If you missing a monitor, that meets specs, you will not be given Dolby Vision approval, simple. But that was true before Covid. No more in-person traing and facilities visits, all is done remotely now.
    And a couple of days ago that has changed again. Starting next year Dolby will stop certifying facilities.
    Instead, they will be certifying colorists and engineers. It is all very new and details are still sketchy, but the bottom line, if you delivering for Youtube, you're good using pretty much any monitor you can afford and deem "good enough".
    For proper Dolby Vision deliverables, not so much

    Will an already certified facility lose it's Dolby Vision Certification if the certified Colorist/Engineer or both leave that facility? And I guess those certified persons could almost name their price for competing Facilities.
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  6. #56  
    Senior Member jake blackstone's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by rand thompson View Post
    Will an already certified facility lose it's Dolby Vision Certification if the certified Colorist/Engineer or both leave that facility? And I guess those certified persons could almost name their price for competing Facilities.
    I'm not sure if I'm allowed to quote letter from Dolby, so I'm only going to paraphrase.
    Facility that is certified will be able to extend the certification for one year only.
    After that no more facility certifications.
    One more thing, any facility that had been certified after beginning of COVID really means, that they just paid their fees.
    It is up to the facility to use the on-line training provided by Dolby. Needless to say, not many facilities do.
    Luckily, for new personal Dolby Vision certification Dolby will requires a passing of a test.
    So, yeah, it seems, certified personnel may end up in high demand
    Jake Blackstone
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  7. #57  
    Senior Member rand thompson's Avatar
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    Thanks Jake for the detailed explanation!
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  8. #58  
    Quote Originally Posted by Phil Holland View Post
    Hi Jake,

    I've had the production model of the Dell UP3221Q for about 2 weeks now.
    Phil, perhaps you can clarify it!
    Does it have a fan? Is it noisy?
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  9. #59  
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    This is all you need until they make a new one.
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  10. #60  
    Senior Member rand thompson's Avatar
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    Official Dell Webpage for Dell UltraSharp 32 HDR PremierColor Monitor - UP3221Q

    https://www.dell.com/en-us/work/shop...or-accessories


    Up3221q Manual and other PDF files located in the middle of the page.
    https://www.dell.com/support/home/en...q-monitor/docs
    Last edited by rand thompson; 11-05-2020 at 09:09 AM.
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