Thread: komodo 6k to 15/70 IMAX?

Reply to Thread
Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 16
  1. #1 komodo 6k to 15/70 IMAX? 
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Posts
    209
    Hi,

    Im looking to get some komodo 6k printed to IMAX 15/70mm... is this possible and if so who does it? Looking to get it projected at IMAX melbourne. I've contacted IMAX and waiting for a reply. No rush but if someone has any information im all ears :)
    Reply With Quote  
     

  2. #2  
    Senior Member Dominik Muench's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    Gold Coast - Australia
    Posts
    2,265
    As far as I know Australia doesn't have any labs anymore that handle motion picture film, let alone one with an Arri Laser. Both Atlab and Deluxe closed down years ago.

    you can try https://nanolab.com.au/ and see if they can help.

    Out of curiosity, why do you want the film negative step in between ? why not create a DCP and screen your footage digitally ?

    Mark Toia did just that recently with his feature Monsters of Man that he shot on RED and screened last week at the Brisbane IMAX.
    Dr. Dominik Münch D.O.C.A
    Filmmaker & Cinematographer
    Epic-W "Lucy"
    http://www.instagram.com/drdominikmuench
    Reply With Quote  
     

  3. #3  
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Posts
    209
    I’m just in love with imax film. Defiantly won’t be able to print in Australia so looking into the us and Canada. Seems like photo Kem can do it. I’m going to project digitally at 4K and project with 15/70mm straight after to compare. Whatever renders the better result will be how I will showcase my work going forward :)
    Reply With Quote  
     

  4. #4  
    Member Nick Vera's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2013
    Location
    Los Angeles, CA
    Posts
    73
    Different Digital projectors are going to yield different results even if they are all 4K. Even printing the digital footage onto IMAX film might yield different results amongst different print copies depending on multiple variables like the batch of film you use, how it's processed in the lab, the way each vendor transitions their own "profile look" (color space and gamma) from digital to celluloid. Arrilaser only goes up to 4K, so if anything you won't gain more detail even if you print on IMAX, in fact you might lose detail. You will gain the grain structure of print film and your "look" (amongst other things) will shift due to the characteristics of print film. Side note, I'm pretty positive ArriLaser only goes up to 35mm film. I think IMAXlaser projectors are your best bet in theatrical IMAX cinema(when it comes to getting as much resolution as possible), but there are a few of those projectors (though their numbers were growing before Covid) and usually you have to go through IMAX post to make sure everything transitions correctly to their projection system.

    If you want the aesthetic of IMAX film, shoot IMAX film. But if you want the next closest thing, shoot with many of the amazing FullFrame imaging systems available now. Shooting at T1.3 on full frame 36mm x 24mm should give you the same shallow DOF of IMAX at T2.8. But of course, the lenses have to work very well at that aperture. Also Full frame and IMAX have different aspect ratios, so you may want to crop the sides slightly on full frame.

    Which cinema camera is up to you, but I wouldn't judge the camera based on the "look the camera gives". That can be changed later in post. Also mimicking the "film look" is very tedious and for some it's taken over a decade to get the look almost indistinguishable to film, but you may want to consult a coloring house for assistance on mimicking print film.

    I can keep going on, but I hope that helps you out in research
    Motion Pictures and Film Professional
    Reply With Quote  
     

  5. #5  
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Posts
    209
    Thanks mate. I’m currently talking to imax. We will see how this goes I’m going to project in both film and 4K digital one after the other. The best looking image in my opinion will be how I will release my stuff in future. Will post here how it all goes! I think the film print will win but only time will tell. At the very least I’ll have a 15/70mm print for my family archives :) only going to be about 5mins of footage :)
    Reply With Quote  
     

  6. #6  
    Quote Originally Posted by Daniel Porto View Post
    Thanks mate. I’m currently talking to imax. We will see how this goes I’m going to project in both film and 4K digital one after the other. The best looking image in my opinion will be how I will release my stuff in future. Will post here how it all goes! I think the film print will win but only time will tell. At the very least I’ll have a 15/70mm print for my family archives :) only going to be about 5mins of footage :)
    My few cents. I owned 2 digital filmprinters back in the days. And sure do the tests, but the money spent going the print way instead of a DCP will improve your imagery more if you poor it into good post and grading. Printing for IMAX does not come cheap. Then on top of that I'm not sure I would print no matter the costs, it's a huge hassle and colors tend to sway quite heavily.

    We did several tests, printing two rolls, same stock same everything right after each other, then handing in one roll to the lab and then the other a few days later, one was green and one was red, and and when it shifts towards green it also looses sharpens. Simply the lab process is not a straight one. And it's really diffcult to get all copies to look the same especially if you don't do them in one big batch.... and when you do you render the risk of having them all look like shit. We worked directly with Kodak and Cinesite and also with the local lab in Stockholm. They all sway like mad in terms of quality.

    But yes, do the test and let us know how it went.

    Regarding DOF and trying to mimic IMAX look etc. I would not shoot wide open sure a Wide open high speed lens of a given FOV looks just like a large format setup wide open with the same FOV. But when having such a large canvas is more about how much you can stop down. Simply super short DOF is not so appealing on a huge screen big sharp vistas is.
    Björn Benckert
    Creative Lead & Founder Syndicate Entertainment AB
    +46855524900 www.syndicate.se/axis
    VFX / Flame / Motion capture / Monstro
    Reply With Quote  
     

  7. #7  
    Senior Member Blair S. Paulsen's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    San Diego, CA
    Posts
    5,339
    FWIW, I'd invest in a more robust post process long before I'd pour cash into creating film prints from DI. I'd investigate the nuances of gamma characteristics, micro-contrast rendition, etc per the actual screen image in an IMAX installation. Make a reel of 10 versions of key scenes and do an "eye test" in the same environment the audience will be in. Adjust as needed.

    IMAX will have plenty of technical setup references for the obvious specs. Where I would focus my input is using a critical eye - and hopefully some taste - in bringing out the best in each unique scene as it will look to the end viewer.

    Cheers - #19
    Reply With Quote  
     

  8. #8  
    Senior Member Karim D. Ghantous's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    Location
    Melbourne AU
    Posts
    2,069
    Quote Originally Posted by Nick Vera View Post
    Shooting at T1.3 on full frame 36mm x 24mm should give you the same shallow DOF of IMAX at T2.8.
    AFAIK, IMAX is always shot stopped down wherever possible.

    Quote Originally Posted by Björn Benckert View Post
    Regarding DOF and trying to mimic IMAX look etc. I would not shoot wide open sure a Wide open high speed lens of a given FOV looks just like a large format setup wide open with the same FOV. But when having such a large canvas is more about how much you can stop down. Simply super short DOF is not so appealing on a huge screen big sharp vistas is.
    I think that's what I've always observed in IMAX productions: deep focus is the default. It makes a lot of sense.
    Good production values may not be noticed. Bad production values will be.
    Unsplash | Pinterest | Flickr | Instagram | 1961 (blog)
    Reply With Quote  
     

  9. #9  
    Member Nick Vera's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2013
    Location
    Los Angeles, CA
    Posts
    73
    Quote Originally Posted by Karim D. Ghantous View Post
    AFAIK, IMAX is always shot stopped down wherever possible.

    I meant in regards to if he's looking for a similar shallow depth of field. Not that he should shoot that. Clearly you should not always shoot wide open. But yeah, if you want to close down to a T4 on IMAX or T5.6, the equivalent DOF on full frame is T1.9 and T2.7

    There are instances where Hoyte shoots wide open on IMAX. I spoke to Dan Sasaki over a year ago about this, and he had told me he was requested to make lenses that open up to T1.8 on IMAX. I believe it was for night exteriors.

    If you want the most resolution and sharpness, closing down will always help at least to an 8, I think at 16,22 some lenses start showing optical issues.
    Motion Pictures and Film Professional
    Reply With Quote  
     

  10. #10  
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Posts
    209
    Got some quotes and it’s going to cost 20,000usd for 5mins of footage. I thought it would be expensive but not that much. 4K dcp is fine with me :)
    Reply With Quote  
     

Posting Permissions
  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts