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  1. #501  
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    I am sorry, I missed two important details in my question.
    1)As I cannot match the color, I want to shoot completely at night and using only work lights
    2)When I mentioned 200/300, I intended Number of lights, not tungsten wattage.
    Hope my question is clear now.
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  2. #502  
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    I am sorry, I missed two important details in my question.
    1)As I cannot match the color, I want to shoot completely at night and using only work lights
    "In other words, a 250w tungsten worklight is not a substitute for an 18K HMI."
    2)When I mentioned 200/300, I intended Number of lights, not tungsten wattage.
    Hope my question is clear now.
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  3. #503  
    Senior Member Dominic Jones's Avatar
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    Hi visakk,

    Sorry if I sound impudent by answering this in place of David Mullen (and I'm sure he'll have much more to say than I do!), but one issue to watch out for is flicker.

    I don't know what wattage work lights you have available to you, but generally, in my experience, they tend to be ~500w units. Due to the relatively small filament size of these flicker can be a problem at high framerates due to the filament "cooling" in the down cycle of the AC power. It probably won't be a problem at 120fps, but you might want to test the specific units in question before a shoot, just to be sure...
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  4. #504  
    Well, certainly hundreds of 500w (if that's what they are, for example) lamps is a lot of light output, but then you have hundreds of extension cords to power them, you have to mount hundreds of lights to something usually. And if running them off of household power, then you can only load each circuit with 20 amps, which may be only three or four worklamps per circuit (not per outlet).

    Worklamps are OK... but they are hard to gel, hard to control spill from, hard to aim/focus. I'd use them for a beginner's lighting package for bouncing and whatnot, but I wouldn't invest in hundreds of them -- if I had that much money, I'd start looking into some used movie lamps.

    You have to ask yourself if you've got the power for hundreds of tungsten worklamps, like from a generator, it may be easier to deal with some 9 or 12-light MaxiBrutes or something if you need a bright backlight for a slow-motion rain sequence.

    Let's say you are happy with the noise of the RED at 1000 ASA. So you need to compensate for running the camera at 120 fps, which is about 2 1/2 stops compared to 24 fps -- that means lighting your night exterior to something like a 160 to 200 ASA level. Possible with worklights in medium shots but probably not wide shots or where the lights are far back, like on a three-story apartment rooftop.
    David Mullen, ASC
    Los Angeles
    http://www.davidmullenasc.com
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  5. #505  
    Regarding hiring AC's, I just worked with a great one in NYC, Frank Rinato. I basically got his resume, liked his credits, saw that he's done a lot of night work (which tends to be near wide-open photography). I interviewed him, liked his quiet professional demeanor, hired him.

    The thing with AC's is that you have to consider things like whether they've done a lot of A-camera 1st AC work or just B or C-camera 1st AC work. Sometimes when all someone has done is day-played here and there, you don't really know how good they are, or how well they can supervise a camera crew and equipment package over a long feature shoot. It's not just about focus-pulling.

    There are unique qualities that an A-camera 1st AC on a narrative feature film has to have compared to someone shooting one or two day commercials, or pulling focus on the occasional B or C-camera. They are really part of the storytelling process -- they have to understand dealing with actors and sensitive scenes, about timing focus to emotion and dialogue. And they have to be in it for the long haul, day after day.

    Good 1st AC's can be a bit temperamental sometimes, it's hard to describe without seeming like an insult, but the good ones are somewhat anal-retentive, it's such a demanding job that requires precision yet speed. They can be a bit like racehorses sometimes, the good ones. The really mellow ones are easier to work with of course, but I always get nervous when the 1st AC is too relaxed...

    As for finding indie feature DP work, it's mainly about meeting directors and producers, the only people that can hire you. If that means doing some freebee short films now & then, working with recent film school graduates, whatever, that's what you have to do to build-up those contacts. It's a snowball effect, one feature credit at a time.

    If "Northfork" had gone through a D.I., it would have looked a little different, not worse or better, just different. However, there is something unique about using the silver retention process on the prints (as we did) because you then can go beyond the D-max of the print stock and get these beautiful blacks with this silver grain in the image, which is wonderful. It conjures up some of the expressive textural qualities of b&w photography, that "sootiness".
    David Mullen, ASC
    Los Angeles
    http://www.davidmullenasc.com
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  6. #506  
    Senior Member Shawn Nelson's Avatar
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    Hey David, after I tracked down some more of your diaries and read them, it seems you often smoke internal scenes. So for medium rooms (living rooms, kitchens, bedrooms, etc), what is your hazer of choice?
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  7. #507  
    I prefer real "hazemakers" over party foggers, etc. They put out a finer mist so there is less work in terms of wafting the smoke around.

    http://www.rosco.com/uk/fog/hazemaker.asp
    http://www.fogfactory.com/haze/haze.html
    http://www.smokemachines.net/buy-hazers.shtml

    Unfortunately, too often I've ended up with a cheap party fogger in a drafty location...
    David Mullen, ASC
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    http://www.davidmullenasc.com
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  8. #508  
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    Do hazers or smoke machines damage mechanics in tape camecorders (DV, HDV)???
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  9. #509  
    Senior Member Mike Prevette's Avatar
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    Well considering it's evaporated Oil I would say in large quantities yes. but for most of my shoots we keep the door on the camera closed ;) i'm sure you could cause some issues if you aimed the fogger right into the camera body.
    _mike

    "One for a meal, One for the reel, or One to learn something"
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  10. #510  
    I'm sure it's no worse on the camera than shooting outside downtown LA for an hour...
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