Click here to go to the first RED TEAM post in this thread.   Thread: NATURAL HISTORY CINEMATOGRAPHY

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  1. #341  
    Junior Member Carlito Herdenberg's Avatar
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    Wildscreen was amazing! Just a great bunch of people coming together :)

    So, as a wildlife camera operator thinking of getting myself a Scarlet-W, I'm doing some research on what evf solutions there are out there. The DSMC2 RED EVF seems really nice. The image is razor sharp and it's nice and small too. However...the mounting options are a bit weird. It's nice to be able to relocate the viewfinder both for handheld and for tripod work. I really love the idea of a cable-free mount.

    Have anyone of you guys come up with a good solution for relocating the viewfinder?
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  2. #342  
    Junior Member Matt Hutchings's Avatar
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    Hi guys,

    Ive just come across this thread for the first time. I've been lurking on RU for about 6 months. It's tuely inspiring!

    I have been looking to get into natural history work for a little while now. I spent a year in Indonesia brushing up on my diving skills/fish ID and have a SW on order which I hope to get allocated in the new year.

    I would very much like to start working in natural history here in the UK. Obviously with my diving expereince I would like to do underwater work but to spread the cost and to gain expereince I am going to purchase a land based set up first. So, I have two(ish) questions:

    What lenses would you start with on the SW I have factored roughly £4,000 but would quite like some varity in there. Baring in mind it has a 1.49 crop 5KFF. I was also looking at the Manfrotto 509 HD legs and head. I get a little lost at bridge plates and rods ect. On a basic set up what would you guys make sure you had? I know it depends on what you are shooting to some degree.... but a general idea would be great.

    Second and probably vastly more important is the behavioural knowledge side of things. I am painfully aware I do not have a biology degree and don't really understand what is meant by 'having knowledge of the animals you're working with'. Would there be anything you would recomend reading... learning about in general... regarding animal behavour ect? Vague quesiton I know, but that probably highlights my lack of understanding.

    Really looking forward to hearing from you! I am working on a show with lots of down time so it's a great chance for me to read until my eyes fall out!

    Cheers,
    Matt
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  3. #343  
    Senior Member Robert Hofmeyr's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Matt Hutchings View Post

    Second and probably vastly more important is the behavioural knowledge side of things. I am painfully aware I do not have a biology degree and don't really understand what is meant by 'having knowledge of the animals you're working with'. Would there be anything you would recomend reading... learning about in general... regarding animal behavour ect? Vague quesiton I know, but that probably highlights my lack of understanding.
    Hi Matt. I'm pretty new to nature cinematography. I have studied zoology, but in my experience, general academic knowledge is not of much practical help when it comes to filming. A broad understanding of things like evolution, ecology and geology is certainly useful, along with specific research on the species and environments you plan to film. But what I have found most helpful, has been to work with local guides (who invariably know more than I could ever hope to learn about a particular area) and to communicate with other filmmakers and photographers in the area. That said, I'd also be interested in any recommended reading for aspiring natural history cinematographers. Perhaps some of the more experienced people on this thread can chime in with some suggestions.
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  4. #344  
    Junior Member Carlito Herdenberg's Avatar
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    So guys,

    Even though this thread is on Reduser and we all love the Red cameras, I thought I'd ask you what you're thoughts are on the Varicam lt in comparisson to Reds? The old Varicam being sort of indusrty standard for quite some time.

    This is what I am thinking.
    Pros:
    800ISO/5000ISO
    Good highlight roll off
    Internal ND

    Cons:
    Highly compressed slow motion
    2k for everything above 60 fps
    Weight and size
    Compression and bit depth of files

    I also have a question about high frame rates. I have yet to work on a film which is to be shown in 4K. But what I have understood (correct me if I'm wrong) that a reason for using Red cameras for wildlife is the ability to shoot 4K slow motion. While the majority of other cameras including Alexa Minis, Sony F5, Varicam lt etc can only do slow motion in HD or 2K. So what I'm wondering is...in what sort of shows is 4K demanded for all footage (slowmo included)? What are your thoughts for the future?
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    Carl Herdenberg

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  5. #345  
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    Just droping in here to say that I've enjoyed following along with this thread, watching beautiful images, and learning a lot.

    My question is: If the canon 150-600mm F5.6L is still the preferred super-tele zoom with the new offerings from Sigma, Tamron, and Nikon? The Sigma sport, contemporary, Tamron G1/G2 are all 5.6-6.3 so there is some light loss compared to the old Canon. The Nikon 200-500mm is F5.6 but uses electronic aperture, and is 100mm shorter. All of these new 150-600's are 2kg lighter or so then the canon, but likely have much shorter focus throws. Tamron makes a matched 1.4x and 2x converter.

    I'll be shooting action sports (surfing, kiteboarding, snowboarding) and some wildlife. Mostly Birds. Thanks.

    Quote Originally Posted by Carlito Herdenberg View Post
    So guys,

    Even though this thread is on Reduser and we all love the Red cameras, I thought I'd ask you what you're thoughts are on the Varicam lt in comparisson to Reds? The old Varicam being sort of indusrty standard for quite some time.

    This is what I am thinking.
    Pros:
    800ISO/5000ISO
    Good highlight roll off
    Internal ND

    Cons:
    Highly compressed slow motion
    2k for everything above 60 fps
    Weight and size
    Compression and bit depth of files

    I also have a question about high frame rates. I have yet to work on a film which is to be shown in 4K. But what I have understood (correct me if I'm wrong) that a reason for using Red cameras for wildlife is the ability to shoot 4K slow motion. While the majority of other cameras including Alexa Minis, Sony F5, Varicam lt etc can only do slow motion in HD or 2K. So what I'm wondering is...in what sort of shows is 4K demanded for all footage (slowmo included)? What are your thoughts for the future?
    The EVA1 seems to offer similar bonuses without raw capability (yet).

    The F55 with the new axs-7 raw recorder has continuous 4k 120p and around 20 seconds of pre-record. It seems like a vary competitive option, if limited to <true 4k. I've seen used kits (without raw recorder) going for Scarlet like prices. I wonder if anyone here has made a comparison with the epic?
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  6. #346  
    Senior Member Sabyasachi Patra's Avatar
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    There is also the Canon 200-400 f4 L IS USM with 1.4x built-in TC. A bit expensive as it is one of the premier lenses, but good.
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  7. #347  
    Senior Member Robert Hofmeyr's Avatar
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    Hi all. Here's some recent footage of mine from Mana Pools, Zimbabwe: https://youtu.be/eFn6uE8btT8. It's a fantastic place to film wildlife: incredible light, beautiful landscapes, and it's one of the few parks with dangerous animals where you are allowed to get out of your vehicle without a guide. Comments/constructive criticism are welcome.

    Rob
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  8. #348  
    Junior Member Carlito Herdenberg's Avatar
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    Hey Brian,

    I used have the Canon 150-600mm f/5.6. It was a nice but heavy lens. But today I think both the Sigma and Tamron lenses makes more sense. The image quality is a bit more modern looking. The only thing I regret not having is working IS and a fixed focus ring rotation. The focus throw is long enough but just not as smooth.

    I decided to go with the Scarlet-W as I think the Reds are great cameras, that are good for other stuff like commercials and drama too. The only thing that I have been missing is the higher ISO capabilities. Shooting high framerates at dusk or in a dark forest really pushes the limits of the sensor.

    Sabyasachi. Is the IS working on the Canon 200-400mm? Definitely the lens that I'll be upgrading to if it does work.
    __________________________________
    Carl Herdenberg

    Wildlife/documentary filmmaker with a past in VFX.
    My website
    Twitter
    Natural History Network
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  9. #349  
    Senior Member Sabyasachi Patra's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Carlito Herdenberg View Post
    Hey Brian,

    I used have the Canon 150-600mm f/5.6. It was a nice but heavy lens. But today I think both the Sigma and Tamron lenses makes more sense. The image quality is a bit more modern looking. The only thing I regret not having is working IS and a fixed focus ring rotation. The focus throw is long enough but just not as smooth.

    I decided to go with the Scarlet-W as I think the Reds are great cameras, that are good for other stuff like commercials and drama too. The only thing that I have been missing is the higher ISO capabilities. Shooting high framerates at dusk or in a dark forest really pushes the limits of the sensor.

    Sabyasachi. Is the IS working on the Canon 200-400mm? Definitely the lens that I'll be upgrading to if it does work.
    Yes the IS in the Canon EF 200-400 works well. It is rated at 4 stops. The good thing about this lens is that you have a built-in 1.4x TC which can be engaged when required.
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  10. #350  
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    Great work Christian...! Thanks for sharing
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