Thread: How Do I get rid of "jello" when stabilizing hand held shots?

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  1. #11  
    Senior Member paulherrin's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Uli Plank View Post
    Use the RS fixer in CS6 first, then the stabilizer. I was able to get decent footage that way even from an iPhone.
    cs6 does not have a public beta, unless i'm mistaken...

    phil, if your shot isn't time-critical you could see if you get better results in cs6 when it comes out. might be interesting to compare results.
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  2. #12  
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    Canon IS lens and you would have had beaufitul steady footage.
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  3. #13  
    Senior Member Shane Betts's Avatar
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    Is it me or does the unstabilised footage seem not to exhibit the jello-cam effect? I mean it's wonky as hell but I'm not noticing jello...
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  4. #14  
    Quote Originally Posted by Paul Russell View Post
    Were you shooting that while in the slipstream of the craft?
    No, but the front of the camera protruded out of the window. There was no turbulence, just strong wind pressure to push against. Definitely hard to hold steady.
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  5. #15  
    Quote Originally Posted by paulherrin View Post
    cs6 does not have a public beta, unless i'm mistaken...

    phil, if your shot isn't time-critical you could see if you get better results in cs6 when it comes out. might be interesting to compare results.
    Thanks Paul. I"ll also check out the advanced settings in Warp stabilizer.
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  6. #16  
    Senior Member Stephen Williams's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Shane Betts View Post
    Is it me or does the unstabilised footage seem not to exhibit the jello-cam effect? I mean it's wonky as hell but I'm not noticing jello...
    Thats what I was thinking. Too many stabalisation points I think
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  7. #17  
    Quote Originally Posted by Josh Snyder View Post
    Canon IS lens and you would have had beaufitul steady footage.
    Really? I am interested but am wondering HOW much better it would be. Would it significantly diminish rolling shutter effects as well as stabilize?

    Thanks,
    Phil
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  8. #18  
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    Quote Originally Posted by Phil Bates View Post
    Really? I am interested but am wondering HOW much better it would be. Would it significantly diminish rolling shutter effects as well as stabilize?

    Thanks,
    Phil
    Not rolling shuttle if you pan but it eliminates all those little bumps, jitters and shakes and that eliminates the rolling shutter effect at the same time. It makes big difference.

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  9. #19  
    Senior Member Matt Ryan's Avatar
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    CS6 trial is out now so you can try the new Rolling Shutter plugin and some warp stabilization and see how it performs:
    http://www.reduser.net/forum/showthr...-HAVE-NO-WORDS
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  10. #20  
    Senior Member paulherrin's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Shane Betts View Post
    Is it me or does the unstabilised footage seem not to exhibit the jello-cam effect? I mean it's wonky as hell but I'm not noticing jello...
    It's probably just the fact that it's moving around so much and it blends in with all the jitter. Your eyes (and stomach) are working harder to keep things straight, so it's camouflaging most of the rolling shuter artifacts. However, it is also very possible that the warp stabilizer is responsible. It is known to add some crazy business like this.

    For a shot like this, you really probably don't want to use the subspace warp method. Try perspective and then position/rotation/scale methods and see what's the best.
    I'd probably take your smoothness value up at least to 100%, remember you can go above 100%, and it's very common to do so.

    In advanced settings, go ahead and check detailed analysis. (it will take longer to do analyze/stabilize/render be aware)

    Once you've tried those things, if you still see rolling shutter - especially if you're just doing a p/r/s method - switch to enhanced rolling shutter reduction.

    There's some good information from Adobe. They generally have very good help documentation and tutorial videos - creative cow is a good place for adobe stuff as well... It's usually easier to find an answer by searching the help documentation than it is googling or posting a question somewhere. Not that I mind helping.

    http://help.adobe.com/en_US/aftereff...c78c-7fff.html

    http://blogs.adobe.com/toddkopriva/2...cts-cs5-5.html

    Also, for tracking/stabilization it can be helpful sometimes to pre-process your footage. If you're having problems getting a good result, and depending on the footage... try some of these things: Get your wb/exposure set and use an s-curve to increase contrast - it can be okay to clip things like the sky that you won't have tracking points for anyways... then increase the sharpness/local contrast using up to a few unsharp masks with various pixel values. If there's something throwing off your track, like somebody moving around in the foreground when you really want to stabilize the horizon - use an alpha channel to mask such areas out. Also, you may need to correct for lens distortion - this can make a huge difference. Also, you can just go ahead and crop the image if there are edge problems/distortions. Once you've got a good result, simply copy the results to your original (or graded) footage and voila.

    If you don't have to do any of that and it works right off the bat that's great - but because the way it works in after effects, I would save it for last in the chain of processing (but probably before sharpening and regrain) - after you've done your color adjustments/etc. Otherwise, you lose a lot of valuable image data.
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