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  1. #5911  
    No, never used them. Obviously anything that puts out a narrow beam is a hard light but a bank of them could be considered semi-soft. Remind me a little of ACL (aircraft landing lights) banks, aka "Jumbo" lights, but smaller.
    David Mullen, ASC
    Los Angeles
    http://www.davidmullenasc.com
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  2. #5912 Rain and mist and fog... 
    Hi David,

    I hope you're enjoying the extended time off during the shut down. I had a couple questions:

    1) Besides backlighting rain, are there any other tips for dealing with shooting rain scenes? If the rain is backlit, do you have to even cut off frontal light from the rain at all? When it's exterior daytime, do you still have to backlight the rain if it's an overcast day? Obviously seems much more difficult since you'd need much bigger lights to backlight anything.

    2) When shooting wide landscape shots where there is fog or haze in the mountains, are there any filters or specifics for exposure in capturing that haze. Does a haze filter really work? I know they exist for still cameras, but I haven't really heard of them being used for film.

    Thanks,
    - dan
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  3. #5913  
    Seeing rain is all about creating highlights in the droplets by backlight and then framing that against a darker background for maximum visibility -- but obviously there are times when you can't achieve that. Outdoors in overcast weather, you see rain when it is framed against a darker background like a row of trees or buildings. If it can be backlit by a hotter sky or lights, all the better. But it is very hard to see rain against a bright background or falling in front of a bright foreground object because it's all about seeing the highlights in the rain droplets. So adding frontal light isn't necessarily a bad thing if you are backlighting rain but it will be less visible in front of the lit foreground objects depending on their tonality.

    UV Haze filters cut a little distant atmospheric haze but really work only because film is sensitive to UV, digital cameras tend not to have that problem. Infrared cameras see through atmospheric haze better.
    David Mullen, ASC
    Los Angeles
    http://www.davidmullenasc.com
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  4. #5914 Gaffer or DP 
    REDuser Sponsor Martin Stevens's Avatar
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    Hello David,

    I hope all is well for you and yours during these covid times.

    What do you do if you are working with a director who is very specific in what he wants, as in,
    he says something to you that you might say to your gaffer, such as, I want a 10k Molebeam with
    full CTO on it coming in from that loft window? And then he says that he wants the 14mm lens on the camera
    and wants the camera very close to the floor looking up etc. And wants some smoke in the room.

    The reason I ask is I am wondering if you talk to directors in advance and decline the job if they are
    going to try and direct the photography and in some ways talk with you like you were a gaffer.

    I am also wondering what other DPs do with directors who are very specific.

    I assume that Ridley Scott was very specific back on his earlier films.
    Regards,
    Martin Stevens

    President and Founder of Glidecam Industries, Inc.
    Producer and Director at Metaphoric Pictures Corporation.
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  5. #5915  
    I've never worked with a director who called specific lighting units like that so I'm not sure how I'd respond, I already drive my gaffer nuts by being too specific so I guess it would be karma to get a director like that... if it looks good, I'd just go with it for now but if it never stops, I'd suggest that the director be their own DP since clearly they are already doing it already. You can be polite about it, respectful, and just say "look, you don't need a DP." Now maybe the DP only got hired because of a union requirement, or the producer insisted, etc.

    Most directors are too busy to take over the lighting of sets even if they wanted to.
    David Mullen, ASC
    Los Angeles
    http://www.davidmullenasc.com
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  6. #5916  
    REDuser Sponsor Martin Stevens's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by David Mullen ASC View Post
    I've never worked with a director who called specific lighting units like that so I'm not sure how I'd respond, I already drive my gaffer nuts by being too specific so I guess it would be karma to get a director like that... if it looks good, I'd just go with it for now but if it never stops, I'd suggest that the director be their own DP since clearly they are already doing it already. You can be polite about it, respectful, and just say "look, you don't need a DP." Now maybe the DP only got hired because of a union requirement, or the producer insisted, etc.

    Most directors are too busy to take over the lighting of sets even if they wanted to.
    Thank you, David.

    If a director is less specific and says something like he wants a gold beam of light to come in through a window
    and back light an actor, would that also be stepping too far into the role of the DP?

    I wonder because after being my own director of photography for decades I'm not sure how a
    hired DP would take to my direction while I'm directing a film.

    Do you normally discuss at length during preproduction what a director wants the film to look like,
    or do they rely on you to create the look the way you want?
    Regards,
    Martin Stevens

    President and Founder of Glidecam Industries, Inc.
    Producer and Director at Metaphoric Pictures Corporation.
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  7. #5917  
    Often preproduction isn't long enough to go into detail about how every scene will be shot and lit but you try and establish the visual approach and come up with references that you both agree on. I think the main thing is to learn the director's taste, what they like and don't like photographically.

    Twice I shot something for former DPs and they were remarkably hands-off, they simply were relieved to have someone else thinking about the cinematography so they could concentrate on directing.
    David Mullen, ASC
    Los Angeles
    http://www.davidmullenasc.com
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  8. #5918 Marvelous Maisel 
    Hi David,

    I saw your instagram post about the burning house shot for Mrs. Maisel. I was curious... you said you wrapped the house in Broad Channel. What is that? From the picture it looks like the pars on the roof were enclosed in an entire strucutre... of CTO? Why did you wrap it around the sides as well, and not just the front? Is it to make the light bloom on the sides as well? It looks like on the maxibrutes on the porch, you only put gels in the front...

    Thanks,
    - dan
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  9. #5919  
    Senior Member Curtis boggs's Avatar
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    Hi David,

    I have a feature coming up where the director likes small movement and push ins.

    What I'd like to do is have a small 20" slider on the stix or dolly all the time
    so if he calls for a small push I can do it quickly.

    My question is what slider or brand would be best for a full built red package and cine lenses,..
    around a 18-22lb build??

    Thank you,

    Curtis
    ---------------------------
    Curtis Boggs
    www.cboggs.com

    Cinematographer-DP-Colorist
    Epic-W 8k (Spanky)
    Komodo 6k (baby)
    Sigma Cinema zoom set
    Leica-R Cine mod prime set
    DZOfilm Pictor zoom set 20-55, 50-125
    Various other strange or vintage lenses
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  10. #5920  
    Senior Member Mark A. Jaeger's Avatar
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    Red with Cinema lenses, batteries, monitors, etc. are heavy. Like you say, 20 lbs is not unusual. Buying a slider meant for DSLR is, IMO, trying to put 20 lbs into a 3-5 lb bag. These lightweight systems will hold a RED but not in the rigidity that one expects and needs. So... one answer would be the Dana Dolly. The DD rigs with pipe (aluminum, steel, plastic) and end clamps so it is not real amenable to a single tripod. You can adapt to a large range of lengths but 20 inch of motion would need about 40 inch pipe (end clamps + dolly + travel). I suggest you contact Mike Hall (owner) at Dana Dolly *(623) 561-6490‬. Maybe he has a single tripod option.
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